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Author Wilson, P.; Thums, M.; Pattiaratchi, C.; Meekan, M.; Pendoley, K.; Fisher, R.; Whiting, S.
Title Artificial light disrupts the nearshore dispersal of neonate flatback turtles Natator depressus Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Marine Ecology Progress Series Abbreviated Journal Mar. Ecol. Prog. Ser.
Volume 600 Issue Pages 179-192
Keywords Animals
Abstract After emerging from nests, neonate sea turtles entering the water are thought to orientate away from shore using wave cues to guide them out to sea. Artificial light may interfere with this process, but the relative importance of natural and anthropogenic cues to the dispersal of hatchlings is unknown. Here, we used acoustic telemetry to track the movement of flatback turtle (Natator depressus) hatchlings dispersing through nearshore waters. Turtles dispersed in the presence and absence of artificial light through a receiver array where a range of oceanographic variables were measured. Turtle tracks were analysed using a full subsets Generalised Additive Mixed Model approach to identify the most important cues influencing the bearing, variance in bearing (a measure of the ability to orientate directly), rate of travel and time spent in the array. Artificial light reduced their swim speed by up to 30%, increased the amount of time spent in nearshore waters (by 50–150%) and increased the variance in bearing (100–180% more variable), regardless of oceanographic conditions. Under ambient conditions, ocean currents affected the bearing of hatchlings as they left the shore, but when light was present, this effect was diminished, showing turtles actively swam against currents in their attempts to move towards light. After accounting for the effects of currents on hatchlings dispersing under ambient conditions, turtles swam offshore by moving perpendicular to the coastline and did not appear to orient into incident wave direction. Overall, light disrupted the dispersal of hatchlings causing them to linger, become disoriented in the near shore and expend energy swimming against ocean currents.
Address
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Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0171-8630 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number (up) GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1967
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Author Pilz, L.K.; Levandovski, R.; Oliveira, M.A.B.; Hidalgo, M.P.; Roenneberg, T.
Title Sleep and light exposure across different levels of urbanisation in Brazilian communities Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Scientific Reports Abbreviated Journal Sci Rep
Volume 8 Issue 1 Pages 11389
Keywords Human Health; Sleep
Abstract Quilombos are settlements originally founded by Africans and African descendants (Quilombolas) in remote parts of Brazil to escape slavery. Due to individual histories, Quilombos nowadays exhibit different states of industrialisation, making them ideal for studying the influence of electrification on daily behaviour. In a comparative approach, we aimed to understand whether and how human sleep changes with the introduction of artificial light. We investigated daily rest-activity-rhythms and sleep-patterns in the Quilombolas' by both wrist actimetry and the Munich ChronoType Questionnaire (MCTQ; the results of these two instruments correlated highly). Seven communities (MCTQ: N = 213/actimetry: N = 125) were compared in this study. Light exposure, phase of activity, sleep timing and duration differ across communities with various levels of urbanisation and histories of access to electricity. People living without electricity and those, who acquired it only very recently on average sleep earlier than those in more urbanised communities (mid-sleep about 1 hour earlier); sleep duration tends to be longer. Our results and those of others show that use of electricity and modern lifestyles have changed sleep behaviour. To understand the consequences of these changes for health, further studies are warranted.
Address Visiting Professor at UFRGS/CAPES, Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil. roenneberg@lmu.de
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2045-2322 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:30061685 Approved no
Call Number (up) GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1968
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Author Ngarambe, J.; Lim, H.S.; Kim, G.
Title Light Pollution: Is there an Environmental Kuznets Curve? Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Sustainable Cities and Society Abbreviated Journal Sustainable Cities and Society
Volume 42 Issue Pages 337-343
Keywords Remote Sensing; Economics; Lighting
Abstract Light pollution is ranked high among recent forms of environmental degradation. While there have been many studies focusing on the diverse effects of artificial lighting on human health, wild life, etc., studies related to the social-economic impact of light pollution have been neglected. In the current paper, we assessed the relationship between economic development and light pollution. Using collected field data of illuminance levels as a measure of light pollution and land prices as an indicator of economic development, we drew conclusions about the effects of economic development on light pollution. The results did not show an inverted-U relationship between the two variables, hence denouncing the Environmental Kuznets Curve (EKC) theory. A regression analysis test showed an R-squared value of 0.322 at p > 0.215. Looking at the obtained results, which show no statistical significance between the two variables, we advise that local light pollution regulation laws and policies be equally stringent throughout districts/cities, regardless of economic status.
Address
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Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2210-6707 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number (up) GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1969
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Author Duan, H.; Cao, Z.; Shen, M.; Liu, D.; Xiao, Q.
Title Detection of illicit sand mining and the associated environmental effects in China's fourth largest freshwater lake using daytime and nighttime satellite images Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Science of The Total Environment Abbreviated Journal Science of The Total Environment
Volume 647 Issue Pages 606-618
Keywords Remote Sensing; Regulation
Abstract Illegal sand mining activities are rampant in coastal and inland water around the world and result in increased water turbidity, reduced water transparency, damage to fish spawning sites and adverse effects on the health of aquatic ecosystems. However, many sand dredging vessels hide during the day and work at night, rendering conventional monitoring measures ineffective. In this study, illegal sand dredging activities and the associated aquatic environmental effects were investigated in Lake Hongze (the fourth largest freshwater lake in China) using both conventional daytime satellite data, including MODIS/Aqua and Landsat TM/ETM data as well as VIIRS Day/Night Band (DNB) nighttime light (NTL) data, the following results were obtained. (1) The Landsat data revealed that sand dredging vessels first appeared in February 2012 and their number (monthly average: 658) peaked in 2016, and sand dredging stopped after March 2017. (2) The VIIRS NTL data were satisfactory for monitoring nighttime illegal dredging activities, and they more accurately reflected the temporal and spatial distribution characteristics of dredging vessels due to their high frequency. (3) Observations from the MODIS data acquired since 2002 showed three distinct stages of changes in the suspended particulate matter (SPM) concentrations of Lake Hongze that were consistent with the temporal distributions of sand dredging vessels. (4) The contribution of dredging vessels to the increases in SPM concentration was quantitatively determined, and nighttime sand dredging activities were found to have disturbed the waters more significantly. (5) The effectiveness of government measures implemented at various stages to control illegal sand dredging activities were scientifically evaluated. This study provides technological support for government monitoring and the control of illegal sand dredging activities and can serve as a valuable reference for water bodies similar to Lake Hongze worldwide. The evaluation method developed in this study could potentially be applied at a global scale.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0048-9697 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number (up) GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1970
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Author Kumar, J.; Malik, S.; Bhardwaj, S.K.; Rani, S.
Title Bright light at night alters the perception of daylength in Indian weaver bird (Ploceus philippinus) Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Journal of Experimental Zoology. Part A, Ecological and Integrative Physiology Abbreviated Journal J Exp Zool A Ecol Integr Physiol
Volume 329 Issue 8-9 Pages 488-496
Keywords Animals
Abstract The brighter nights have posed new challenges to the wild species by affecting their temporal physiology. The present study on Indian weaver bird (Ploceus philippinus) investigated if exposure to bright light at different phases of night affects their clock-mediated daily functions. Birds were placed individually in specially designed activity cages under short days and long nights (8L:16D; L = 100 lux, D < 0.1 lux) for approximately 3 weeks (19 days). Thereafter, they were divided into four groups (n = 6-9), and given approximately 2 lux light either for the entire night (ZT 08-24; zeitgeber time 0 = time of light on; pattern A) or for 4 hr (pattern B), placed in 16 hr night such that its onset coincides with the onset of night (early night group, ZT 08-12), its end with the end of night (late night group, ZT 20-24), or the night was interrupted in the middle (midnight group, ZT 14-18). The results showed that bright light in entire night induced early onset of day activity and fragmented rest at night, however, if given at different phases of night, it made the days longer by delaying end (early night group) or advancing onset of daily activity (late night group). It also suppressed the melatonin levels and increased body temperature. These results suggest that bright light at night alters the perception of daylength and affects the underlying physiology. The findings may be useful in adopting a strategy for use of night light without disturbing species fitness in their environment.
Address Department of Zoology, University of Lucknow, Lucknow, India
Corporate Author Thesis
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Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2471-5638 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:30043408 Approved no
Call Number (up) GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1971
Permanent link to this record