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Author Kernbach, M.E.; Newhouse, D.J.; Miller, J.M.; Hall, R.J.; Gibbons, J.; Oberstaller, J.; Selechnik, D.; Jiang, R.H.Y.; Unnasch, T.R.; Balakrishnan, C.N.; Martin, L.B.
Title Light pollution increases West Nile virus competence of a ubiquitous passerine reservoir species Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Proceedings. Biological Sciences Abbreviated Journal Proc Biol Sci
Volume 286 Issue 1907 Pages (down) 20191051
Keywords Animals; Human Health; anthropogenic; ecoimmunology; host competence; light pollution; reservoir host
Abstract Among the many anthropogenic changes that impact humans and wildlife, one of the most pervasive but least understood is light pollution. Although detrimental physiological and behavioural effects resulting from exposure to light at night are widely appreciated, the impacts of light pollution on infectious disease risk have not been studied. Here, we demonstrate that artificial light at night (ALAN) extends the infectious-to-vector period of the house sparrow (Passer domesticus), an urban-dwelling avian reservoir host of West Nile virus (WNV). Sparrows exposed to ALAN maintained transmissible viral titres for 2 days longer than controls but did not experience greater WNV-induced mortality during this window. Transcriptionally, ALAN altered the expression of gene regulatory networks including key hubs (OASL, PLBD1 and TRAP1) and effector genes known to affect WNV dissemination (SOCS). Despite mounting anti-viral immune responses earlier, transcriptomic signatures indicated that ALAN-exposed individuals probably experienced pathogen-induced damage and immunopathology, potentially due to evasion of immune effectors. A simple mathematical modelling exercise indicated that ALAN-induced increases of host infectious-to-vector period could increase WNV outbreak potential by approximately 41%. ALAN probably affects other host and vector traits relevant to transmission, and additional research is needed to advise the management of zoonotic diseases in light-polluted areas.
Address Center for Global Health Infectious Disease Research, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL 33620, USA
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0962-8452 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:31337318; PMCID:PMC6661335 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2611
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Author Wahl, S.; Engelhardt, M.; Schaupp, P.; Lappe, C.; Ivanov, I.V.
Title The inner clock – blue light sets the human rhythm Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Journal of Biophotonics Abbreviated Journal J Biophotonics
Volume 12 Issue 12 Pages (down) e201900102
Keywords Human Health; blue light; circadian rhythm; melanopsin; melatonin; visible light
Abstract Visible light synchronizes the human biological clock in the suprachiasmatic nuclei of the hypothalamus to the solar 24-hour cycle. Short wavelengths, perceived as blue color, are the strongest synchronizing agent for the circadian system that keeps most biological and psychological rhythms internally synchronized. Circadian rhythm is important for optimum function of organisms and circadian sleep-wake disruptions or chronic misalignment often may lead to psychiatric and neurodegenerative illness. The beneficial effect on circadian synchronization, sleep quality, mood, and cognitive performance depends not only on the light spectral composition but also on the timing of exposure and its intensity. Exposure to blue light during the day is important to suppress melatonin secretion, the hormone that is produced by the pineal gland and plays crucial role in circadian rhythm entrainment. While the exposure to blue is important for keeping organism's wellbeing, alertness, and cognitive performance during the day, chronic exposure to low-intensity blue light directly before bed-time, may have serious implications on sleep quality, circadian phase and cycle durations. This rises inevitably the need for solutions to improve wellbeing, alertness and cognitive performance in today's modern society where exposure to blue light emitting devices is ever increasing. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
Address Carl Zeiss Vision International GmbH, Aalen, Germany
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1864-063X ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:31433569 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2655
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Author Ebbensgaard, C.L.
Title Standardised difference: Challenging uniform lighting through standards and regulation Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Urban Studies Abbreviated Journal Urban Studies
Volume in press Issue Pages (down) 0042098019866568
Keywords Regulation; Lighting; Conservation; Darkness; Planning; Society
Abstract Artificial lighting has received increased attention from urban scholars and geographers in recent years. It is celebrated for its experimental aesthetics and experiential qualities and critiqued for its adverse effects on biological life and the environment. Yet scholars and practitioners unite in their disapproval of uniform and homogenous lighting that follows from standardised lighting technologies and design principles. Absent from debates in urban scholarship and geography, however, is any serious consideration of how lighting designers respond to such standardised measures and regulations. In this article, I address this lack of academic attention by exploring how designers overturn the restrictive challenges posed by the standards and regulations of the design and planning process. Drawing on interviews with designers involved in the lighting design of a mixed-use redevelopment project in Canning Town, East London, I demonstrate how the interpretation and translation of lighting standards and regulations resist the tendency to predetermine design aesthetics and functions. By drawing attention away from the technical specifications and numerical values that are prescribed in standards and regulations, and towards lighting’s experiential and performative effects, the article argues that lighting designers can play an important role in challenging how standards and regulations are measured, defined and maintained. Calling on urban scholars to play a more prominent role in foregrounding this process of translation, I suggest that standards and regulations can provide frameworks within which luminous differentiation and preservation of darkness can be achieved, playing a potentially crucial role in ensuring a socially and environmentally sustainable transition to energy efficient lighting.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0042-0980 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2678
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Author Liang, H.; Guo, Z.; Wu, J.; Chen, Z.
Title GDP spatialization in Ningbo City based on NPP/VIIRS night-time light and auxiliary data using random forest regression Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Advances in Space Research Abbreviated Journal Advances in Space Research
Volume in press Issue Pages (down) S0273117719307136
Keywords Remote Sensing; GDP; gross domestic product; spatialization; VIIRS-DNB; Nighttime light; numerical methods
Abstract Accurate spatial distribution information on gross domestic product (GDP) is of great importance for the analysis of economic development, industrial distribution and urbanization processes. Traditional administrative unit-based GDP statistics cannot depict the detailed spatial differences in GDP within each administrative unit. This paper presents a study of GDP spatialization in Ningbo City, China based on National Polar-orbiting Partnership (NPP)/Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) night-time light (NTL) data and town-level GDP statistical data. The Landsat image, land cover, road network and topographic data were also employed as auxiliary data to derive independent variables for GDP modelling. Multivariate linear regression (MLR) and random forest (RF) regression were used to estimate GDP at the town scale and were assessed by cross-validation. The results show that the RF model achieved significantly higher accuracy, with a mean absolute error (MAE) of 109.46 million China Yuan (CNY)·km-2 and a determinate coefficient (R2=0.77) than the MLR model (MAE=161.8 million CNY·km-2, R2=0.59). Meanwhile, by comparing with the estimated GDP data at the county level, the town-level estimated data showed a better performance in mapping GDP distribution (MAE decreased from 115.1 million CNY·km-2 to 74.8 million CNY·km-2). Among all of the independent variables, NTL, land surface temperature (Ts) and plot ratio (PR) showed higher impacts on the GDP estimation accuracy than the other variables. The GDP density map generated by the RF model depicted the detailed spatial distribution of the economy in Ningbo City. By interpreting the spatial distribution of the GDP, we found that the GDP of Ningbo was high in the northeast and low in the southwest and formed continuous clusters in the north. In addition, the GDP of Ningbo also gradually decreased from the urban centre to its surrounding areas. The produced GDP map provides a good reference for the future urban planning and socio-economic development strategies.
Address
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Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0273-1177 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2680
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Author Ludtke, L.E.
Title Sleep, disruption and the ‘nightmare of total illumination’ in late nineteenth and early twentieth-century dystopian fiction Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Interface Focus Abbreviated Journal Interface Focus.
Volume 10 Issue 3 Pages (down) 20190130
Keywords Literature; Society; History
Abstract This article addresses the charge that the introduction of the electric light in the late nineteenth century increased disruptions to the human body's biological processes and interfered with the oscillating sleeping–waking cycle. By considering the nineteenth century research into the factors that motivate and disrupt sleep in concert with contemporary discussions of the physiology of street lighting, this article exposes how social and political forces shaped the impact of artificial light on sleep and, more perniciously, on bodily autonomy. As a close reading of artificial light in three influential dystopian novels building on these historical contexts demonstrates, dystopian fiction challenges the commonplace assumption that the advent of the electric light, or of widespread street lighting in public urban spaces, posed an immediate or inherent threat to sleep. Beginning with H. G. Wells's The Sleeper Awakes (1899), in which the eponymous sleeper emerges from a cataleptic trance into a future in which electric light and power are used to control the populace, representations of artificial light in early dystopian fiction of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries depict a nightmare of total illumination in which the state exerted its control over the individual. In Aldous Huxley's Brave New World (1932), constant artificial illumination plays a vital role in the chemical and behavioural conditioning undergone by individuals in a post-Fordian world. George Orwell intensifies this relationship between light and individual autonomy in Nineteen Eighty-Four (1949), where access to electric current (and thus light) is limited at certain times of the day, brownouts and electrical rationing occur intermittently, and total illumination is used to torture and reprogram individuals believed to have betrayed Big Brother.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2042-8898 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2888
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