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Author Admiranto, A.G.; Priyatikanto, R.; Maryam, S.; Ellyyani,; Suryana, N.
Title Preliminary Report of Light Pollution in Indonesia Based on Sky Quality Observation Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Journal of Physics: Conference Series Abbreviated Journal J. Phys.: Conf. Ser.
Volume 1231 Issue Pages (down) 012017
Keywords Skyglow
Abstract We observed night sky quality in several LAPAN stations (Agam, Bandung, Pontianak, Sumedang, Garut, Pasuruan, and Biak) which were conducted from April until July 2018 using Unihedron Sky Quality Meter LU-DL type. Observational data from all of the observational points were then sent regularly to a centralized database for further use. Although most of the measurements were done in overcast conditions, we were able to determine the representative clear sky brightness statistically. The results showed that the light pollution level of the most of the stations are moderate (the values at Biak, Agam, Sumedang, and Pontianak are 20.0, 19.5, 19.6, and 17.7 mpsas respectively) and the stations which are located near or in cities are high (Bandung and Pasuruan with 17.1 and 18.0 mpsas, respectively). In a particular station (Garut) the light pollution is low (20.6 mpsas), so it is good to make this spot to be a location of astrotourism.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
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Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1742-6588 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2570
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Author Prastyo, H.A.; Herdiwijaya, D.
Title Spatial Analysis of Light Pollution Dynamics Around Bosscha Observatory and Timau National Observatory Based on VIIRS-DNB Satellite Images Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Journal of Physics: Conference Series Abbreviated Journal J. Phys.: Conf. Ser.
Volume 1231 Issue Pages (down) 012002
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract Bosscha Observatory is the largest and oldest observatory in Indonesia that has been actively doing astronomical research since 1928. Bosscha Observatory was originally very suitable for observing astronomical objects because of its ideal night sky conditions and covered most of the northern and southern sky areas. However, starting at the end of 1980, the quality of the night sky at Bosscha Observatory has decreased along with the development of cities around the observatory. Therefore, the construction of a new observatory in Indonesia is currently underway, i.e. the Timau National Observatory. One of the main causes of the decreasing quality of the night sky at Bosscha Observatory is light pollution. Light pollution is one form of pollution caused by excessive light outside the room released into the sky, causing an increase in brightness of the night sky. The brightness increasing of the night sky causes relatively faint astronomical object, e.g. Milky Way Galaxy that is difficult to observe. Based on the analysis of the dynamics of light pollution in a radius of 20 km from Bosscha Observatory and at a radius of 90 km from the Timau National Observatory in 2013-2017 using VIIRS-DNB satellite imagery, it is known that there is a wide change in light pollution for the very low, low, medium, high, and very high. The average area of light pollution at a radius of 20 km from Bosscha Observatory for the category of very low, low, medium, high, and very high categories experienced a rate of -41.3 ± 135.2 km2 / year, 5.9 ± 97.2 km2 / year, 15.1 ± 14.6 km2 / year, 18.0 ± 42.6 km2 / year, and 2.1 ± 10.2 km2 / year. The rate of increase in the extent of light pollution for the medium, high, and very high categories occurs south of the Bosscha Observatory, which is towards the city of Bandung. The average area of light pollution in a 90 km radius from the Timau National Observatory for the very low, low, medium, and high categories experienced a rate of 20.8 ± 43.4 km2 / year, -22.1 ± 40.9 km2 / year, 3.0 ± 7.3 km2 / year, and -1.7 ± 7.3 km2 / year. Therefore, the night sky in the 128-268 degrees azimuth direction at Bosscha Observatory is relatively not ideal as a location for observing astronomical objects, and the Timau National Observatory is still relatively ideal as a location for observing astronomical objects, but it is necessary to monitor the dynamics of light pollution in the direction of 207-215 degrees azimuth which leads to Kupang City.
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Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1742-6588 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2568
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Author Rezky, M.; Priyatikanto, R.; Admiranto, A.G.; Soegiartini, E.
Title Pattern recognition as tools for understanding night sky brightness variabilities Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Journal of Physics: Conference Series Abbreviated Journal J. Phys.: Conf. Ser.
Volume 1231 Issue Pages (down) 012001
Keywords Skyglow
Abstract
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1742-6588 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2565
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Author Giavi, S.; Blosch, S.; Schuster, G.; Knop, E.
Title Artificial light at night can modify ecosystem functioning beyond the lit area Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Scientific Reports Abbreviated Journal Sci Rep
Volume 10 Issue 1 Pages (down) 11870
Keywords plants; ecology
Abstract Artificial light at night (ALAN) is a relatively new and rapidly increasing global change driver. While evidence on adverse effects of ALAN for biodiversity and ecosystem functioning is increasing, little is known on the spatial extent of its effects. We therefore tested whether ALAN can affect ecosystem functioning in areas adjacent to directly illuminated areas. We exposed two phytometer species to three different treatments of ALAN (sites directly illuminated, sites adjacent to directly illuminated sites, control sites without illumination), and we measured its effect on the reproductive output of both plant species. Furthermore, in one of the two plant species, we quantified pre-dispersal seed predation and the resulting relative reproductive output. Finally, under controlled condition in the laboratory, we assessed flower visitation and oviposition of the main seed predator in relation to light intensity. There was a trend for reduced reproductive output of one of the two plant species on directly illuminated sites, but not of the other. Compared to dark control sites, seed predation was significantly increased on dark sites adjacent to illuminated sites, which resulted in a significantly reduced relative reproductive output. Finally, in the laboratory, the main seed predator flew away from the light source to interact with its host plant in the darkest area available, which might explain the results found in the field. We conclude that ALAN can also affect ecosystem functioning in areas not directly illuminated, thereby having ecological consequences at a much larger scale than previously thought.
Address Department of Evolutionary Biology and Environmental Studies, University of Zurich, Winterthurerstr. 190, 8057, Zurich, Switzerland. eva.knop@ieu.uzh.ch
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Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2045-2322 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:32681056; PMCID:PMC7368033 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3076
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Author Pilz, L.K.; Levandovski, R.; Oliveira, M.A.B.; Hidalgo, M.P.; Roenneberg, T.
Title Sleep and light exposure across different levels of urbanisation in Brazilian communities Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Scientific Reports Abbreviated Journal Sci Rep
Volume 8 Issue 1 Pages (down) 11389
Keywords Human Health; Sleep
Abstract Quilombos are settlements originally founded by Africans and African descendants (Quilombolas) in remote parts of Brazil to escape slavery. Due to individual histories, Quilombos nowadays exhibit different states of industrialisation, making them ideal for studying the influence of electrification on daily behaviour. In a comparative approach, we aimed to understand whether and how human sleep changes with the introduction of artificial light. We investigated daily rest-activity-rhythms and sleep-patterns in the Quilombolas' by both wrist actimetry and the Munich ChronoType Questionnaire (MCTQ; the results of these two instruments correlated highly). Seven communities (MCTQ: N = 213/actimetry: N = 125) were compared in this study. Light exposure, phase of activity, sleep timing and duration differ across communities with various levels of urbanisation and histories of access to electricity. People living without electricity and those, who acquired it only very recently on average sleep earlier than those in more urbanised communities (mid-sleep about 1 hour earlier); sleep duration tends to be longer. Our results and those of others show that use of electricity and modern lifestyles have changed sleep behaviour. To understand the consequences of these changes for health, further studies are warranted.
Address Visiting Professor at UFRGS/CAPES, Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil. roenneberg@lmu.de
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2045-2322 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:30061685 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1968
Permanent link to this record