|   | 
Details
   web
Records
Author Xiao, Q.; Gee, G.; Jones, R.R.; Jia, P.; James, P.; Hale, L.
Title Cross-sectional association between outdoor artificial light at night and sleep duration in middle-to-older aged adults: The NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Environmental Research Abbreviated Journal Environ Res
Volume 180 Issue Pages (down) 108823
Keywords Remote Sensing; Human Health; Artificial light at night; Circadian disruption; Neighborhood; Sleep; Socioeconomic disadvantage
Abstract INTRODUCTION: Artificial light at night (ALAN) can disrupt circadian rhythms and cause sleep disturbances. Several previous epidemiological studies have reported an association between higher levels of outdoor ALAN and shorter sleep duration. However, it remains unclear how this association may differ by individual- and neighborhood-level socioeconomic status, and whether ALAN may also be associated with longer sleep duration. METHODS: We assessed the cross-sectional relationship between outdoor ALAN and self-reported sleep duration in 333,365 middle- to older-aged men and women in the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study. Study participants reported baseline addresses, which were geocoded and linked with outdoor ALAN exposure measured by satellite imagery data obtained from the U.S. Defense Meteorological Satellite Program's Operational Linescan System. We used multinomial logistic regression to estimate the multinomial odds ratio (MOR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the likelihood of reporting very short (<5h), short (<7h) and long (>/=9h) sleep relative to reporting 7-8h of sleep across quintiles of LAN. We also conducted subgroup analyses by individual-level education and census tract-level poverty levels. RESULTS: We found that higher levels of ALAN were associated with both very short and short sleep. When compared to the lowest quintile, the highest quintile of ALAN was associated with 16% and 25% increases in the likelihood of reporting short sleep in women (MORQ1 vs Q5, (95% CI), 1.16 (1.10, 1.22)) and men (1.25 (1.19, 1.31)), respectively. Moreover, we found that higher ALAN was associated with a decrease in the likelihood of reporting long sleep in men (0.79 (0.71, 0.89)). We also found that the associations between ALAN and short sleep were larger in neighborhoods with higher levels of poverty. CONCLUSIONS: The burden of short sleep may be higher among residents in areas with higher levels of outdoor LAN, and this association is likely stronger in poorer neighborhoods. Future studies should investigate the potential benefits of reducing light intensity in high ALAN areas in improve sleep health.
Address Program in Public Health, Department of Family, Population, and Preventive Medicine, Stony Brook Medicine, Stony Brook, NY, USA
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0013-9351 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:31627155 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2702
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Kocifaj, M.
Title Ground albedo impacts on higher-order scattering spectral radiances of night sky Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy and Radiative Transfer Abbreviated Journal Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy and Radiative Transfer
Volume 239 Issue Pages (down) 106670
Keywords skyglow
Abstract The contribution from ground reflected light to the night sky radiance is of increased interest because of constant modernization of street lighting systems that now efficiently eliminate light emissions above the horizontal plane, so the appreciable fraction of artificial light directed upwards is from ground reflection. Diffuse light of a night sky shows a positive correlation with ground albedo (α), but it seems there is no linear trend between α and the night sky brightness (NSB), at least not for all sky elements, and, the mechanism of this relationship becomes even more complicated due to multiple scattering effects. The extent to which the ground reflectance influences the higher-order scattering radiance of night sky, and, the factors that initiate the crossover from single- to multiple-scattering dominance of the sky glow has been virtually unexplored until now.

We demonstrate here that albedo-induced effects in NSB exhibit an angular dependence, with amplitudes enhanced towards shorter wavelengths. For low values of ground reflectance and at short distances from a light source, the second-scattering radiance is found to be only a few percent of the first-order scattering radiance. However, the ratio of a higher- to the first-order scattering radiance gradually increases near horizon, specifically at the side opposite to the azimuthal position of the light source. Also the NSB in blue band has decreasing gradation tendency when increasing the altitude above sea level. The findings in this paper are significant in a proper incorporation of higher-order scattering in modeling the NSB under elevated reflectance conditions, and may be critical for saving computational time.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0022-4073 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2679
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Beresford, A.E.; Donald, P.F.; Buchanan, G.M.
Title Repeatable and standardised monitoring of threats to Key Biodiversity Areas in Africa using Google Earth Engine Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Ecological Indicators Abbreviated Journal Ecological Indicators
Volume 109 Issue Pages (down) 105763
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract Key Biodiversity Areas (KBAs) are sites that make significant contributions to the global persistence of biodiversity, but identification of sites alone is not sufficient to ensure their conservation. Monitoring is essential if pressures on these sites are to be identified, priorities set and appropriate responses developed. Here, we describe how analysis of freely available data on a cloud-processing platform (Google Earth Engine) can be used to assess changes in three example remotely sensed threat indicators (fire frequency, tree loss and night-time lights) over time on KBAs in Africa. We develop easily repeatable methods with shared code that could be applied across any geographic area and could be adapted and applied to other datasets as they become available. Fire frequency was found to have increased significantly on 12.4% of KBAs and 15.9% of ecoregions, whilst rates of forest loss increased significantly on 24.3% of KBAs and 22.6% of ecoregions. There was also evidence of significant increases in night-time lights on over half (53.3%) of KBAs and 39.6% of ecoregions between 1992 and 2013, and on 11.6% of KBAs and 53.0% of ecoregions between 2014 and 2018.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1470160X ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2707
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Xu, P.; Wang, Q.; Jin, J.; Jin, P.
Title An increase in nighttime light detected for protected areas in mainland China based on VIIRS DNB data Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Ecological Indicators Abbreviated Journal Ecological Indicators
Volume 107 Issue Pages (down) 105615
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract Protected areas, a globally accepted conservation strategy, play a fundamental role in biodiversity and species conservation. There are increasing concerns about the ecological influence of nighttime light within protected areas due to the emergence of more light-related ecological issues. Previous approaches for detecting nighttime light mainly used the traditional data source released by the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program Operational Linescan System (DMSP/OLS), but its coarse spatial resolution and limited radiometric resolution dramatically hamper prompt detection. In this study, we used data from a new source, the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite Day-Night Band (VIIRS DNB) to detect nighttime light disturbance within protected areas of mainland China. Protected areas extracted from Landsat 8 Operational Land Imager and the Thermal Infrared Sensor (OLI-TIRS) images served as ground truths to assess detection accuracy. We found that the VIIRS DNB data provided more and better details compared with the traditional DMSP/OLS data. Pixel-based trend analysis clearly indicated that within the protected areas lighted pixels existed extensively and increased significantly from 2012 to 2017. This study provides a new solution to better understand human activities within protected areas.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1470160X ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2612
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Obayashi, K.; Yamagami, Y.; Tatsumi, S.; Kurumatani, N.; Saeki, K.
Title Indoor light pollution and progression of carotid atherosclerosis: A longitudinal study of the HEIJO-KYO cohort Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Environment International Abbreviated Journal Environment International
Volume 133 Issue Pages (down) 105184
Keywords Human Health
Abstract Exposure to light at inappropriate times in relation to the solar cycle can disturb circadian endocrine and metabolic rhythms. Previous studies have suggested an association between light exposure at night (LAN) and obesity, an important risk factor of atherosclerosis, although it remains unclear whether LAN associates with progression of atherosclerosis. To evaluate the longitudinal association between bedroom LAN intensity and progression of carotid atherosclerosis, light intensity in the bedroom at baseline and carotid artery intima-media thickness (IMT) at baseline and follow-up were measured in 989 elderly participants (945 at baseline and 780 at a median follow-up time of 34 months). The mean age of the participants was 71.4 ± 6.9 years. The average mean and maximal carotid IMT at baseline were 0.88 ± 0.15 and 1.10 ± 0.32 mm, respectively. The median intensity of bedroom LAN was 0.68 lx (IQR, 0.07–3.29). In multivariable analysis adjusted for potential confounders, the highest LAN group exhibited a significant increase in mean carotid IMT (adjusted β, 0.028; 95% CI, 0.005–0.052; P = 0.019) compared with the lowest LAN quartile group. A similar relationship was found between LAN and maximal carotid IMT (adjusted β, 0.083; 95% CI, 0.037–0.129; P < 0.001).

In conclusion, we found a clear and significant association between bedroom LAN intensity and progression of subclinical carotid atherosclerosis, which was independent of known risk factors for atherosclerosis, including age, obesity, smoking, economic status, hypertension, and diabetes. Indoor light pollution may be a potential risk factor for atherosclerosis in the general population.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0160-4120 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2706
Permanent link to this record