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Author Molcan, L.; Sutovska, H.; Okuliarova, M.; Senko, T.; Krskova, L.; Zeman, M.
Title Dim light at night attenuates circadian rhythms in the cardiovascular system and suppresses melatonin in rats Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Life Sciences Abbreviated Journal Life Sci
Volume 231 Issue Pages (down) 116568
Keywords Animals
Abstract AIMS: Cardiovascular parameters exhibit significant 24-h variability, which is coordinated by the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), and light/dark cycles control SCN activity. We aimed to study the effects of light at night (ALAN; 1-2lx) on cardiovascular system control in normotensive rats. MAIN METHODS: Heart rate (HR) and blood pressure (BP) were measured by telemetry during five weeks of ALAN exposure. From beat-to-beat telemetry data, we evaluated spontaneous baroreflex sensitivity (sBRS). After 2 (A2) and 5 (A5) weeks of ALAN, plasma melatonin concentrations and the response of BP and HR to norepinephrine administration were measured. The expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and endothelin-1 was determined in the aorta. Spontaneous exploratory behaviour was evaluated in an open-field test. KEY FINDINGS: ALAN significantly suppressed the 24-h variability in the HR, BP, and sBRS after A2, although the parameters were partially restored after A5. The daily variability in the BP response to norepinephrine was reduced after A2 and restored after A5. ALAN increased the BP response to norepinephrine compared to the control after A5. Increased eNOS expression was found in arteries after A2 but not A5. Endothelin-1 expression was not affected by ALAN. Plasma melatonin levels were suppressed after A2 and A5. Spontaneous exploratory behaviour was reduced. SIGNIFICANCE: ALAN decreased plasma melatonin and the 24-h variability in the haemodynamic parameters and increased the BP response to norepinephrine. A low intensity ALAN can suppress circadian control of the cardiovascular system with negative consequences on the anticipation of a load.
Address Department of Animal Physiology and Ethology, Faculty of Natural Sciences, Comenius University, Bratislava, Slovakia
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0024-3205 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:31202842 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2548
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Author van Hasselt, S.J.; Hut, R.A.; Allocca, G.; Vyssotski, A.L.; Piersma, T.; Rattenborg, N.C.; Meerlo, P.
Title Cloud cover amplifies the sleep-suppressing effect of artificial light at night in geese Type Journal Article
Year 2021 Publication Environmental Pollution Abbreviated Journal Environmental Pollution
Volume in press Issue Pages (down) 116444
Keywords Animals; Skyglow
Abstract In modern society the night sky is lit up not only by the moon but also by artificial light devices. Both of these light sources can have a major impact on wildlife physiology and behaviour. For example, a number of bird species were found to sleep several hours less under full moon compared to new moon and a similar sleep-suppressing effect has been reported for artificial light at night (ALAN). Cloud cover at night can modulate the light levels perceived by wildlife, yet, in opposite directions for ALAN and moon. While clouds will block moon light, it may reflect and amplify ALAN levels and increases the night glow in urbanized areas. As a consequence, cloud cover may also modulate the sleep-suppressing effects of moon and ALAN in different directions. In this study we therefore measured sleep in barnacle geese (Branta leucopsis) under semi-natural conditions in relation to moon phase, ALAN and cloud cover. Our analysis shows that, during new moon nights stronger cloud cover was indeed associated with increased ALAN levels at our study site. In contrast, light levels during full moon nights were fairly constant, presumably because of moonlight on clear nights or because of reflected artificial light on cloudy nights. Importantly, cloud cover caused an estimated 24.8% reduction in the amount of night-time NREM sleep from nights with medium to full cloud cover, particularly during new moon when sleep was unaffected by moon light. In conclusion, our findings suggest that cloud cover can, in a rather dramatic way, amplify the immediate effects of ALAN on wildlife. Sleep appears to be highly sensitive to ALAN and may therefore be a good indicator of its biological effects.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0269-7491 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3239
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Author Lu, L.; Weng, Q.; Xie, Y.; Guo, H.; Li, Q.
Title An assessment of global electric power consumption using the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program-Operational Linescan System nighttime light imagery Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Energy Abbreviated Journal Energy
Volume 189 Issue Pages (down) 116351
Keywords Remote Sensing; Energy; electric power consumption; Night lights
Abstract Industrialization and urbanization have led to a remarkable increase of electric power consumption (EPC) during the past decades. To assess the changing patterns of EPC at the global scale, this study utilized nighttime lights in conjunction with population and built-up datasets to map EPC at 1 km resolution. Firstly, the inter-calibrated nighttime light data were enhanced using the V4.0 Gridded Population Density data and the Global Human Settlement Layer. Secondly, linear models were calibrated to relate EPC to the enhanced nighttime light data; these models were then employed to estimate per-pixel EPC in 2000 and 2013. Finally, the spatiotemporal patterns of EPC between the periods were analyzed at the country, continental, and global scales. The evaluation of the EPC estimation shows a reasonable accuracy at the provincial scale with R2 of 0.8429. Over 30% of the human settlements in Asia, Europe, and North America showed apparent EPC growth. At the national scale, moderate and high EPC growth was observed in 45% of the built-up areas in East Asia. The spatial clustering patterns revealed that EPC decreased in Russia and the Western Europe. This study provides fresh insight into the spatial pattern and variations of global electric power consumption.
Address Key Laboratory of Digital Earth Science, Institute of Remote Sensing and Digital Earth, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100094, PR China; qweng(at)indstate.edu
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Elsevier Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0360-5442 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2701
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Author Li, S.; Cheng, L.; Liu, X.; Mao, J.; Wu, J.; Li, M.
Title City type-oriented modeling electric power consumption in China using NPP-VIIRS nighttime stable light data Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Energy Abbreviated Journal Energy
Volume 189 Issue Pages (down) 116040
Keywords Energy; Remote Sensing; China; electric power consumption; Night lights; Nighttime light; VIIRS-DNB
Abstract Accelerating urbanization has created tremendous pressure on the global environment and energy supply, making accurate estimates of energy use of great importance. Most current models for estimating electric power consumption (EPC) from nighttime light (NTL) imagery are oversimplified, ignoring influential social and economic factors. Here we propose first classifying cities by economic focus and then separately estimating each category’s EPC using NTL data. We tested this approach using statistical employment data for 198 Chinese cities, 2015 NTL data from the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS), and annual electricity consumption statistics. We used cluster analysis of employment by sector to divide the cities into three types (industrial, service, and technology and education), then established a linear regression model for each city's NTL and EPC. Compared with the estimation results before city classification (R2: 0.785), the R2 of the separately modeled service cities and technology and education cities increased to 0.866 and 0.830, respectively. However, the results for industrial cities were less consistent due to their more complex energy consumption structure. In general, using classification before modeling helps reflect factors affecting the relationship between EPC and NTL, making the estimation process more reasonable and improving the accuracy of the results.
Address School of Geography and Ocean Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing, 210023, China
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0360-5442 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2672
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Author Zhang, H.; Yan, K.; Sui, L.; Nie, J.; Cui, K.; Liu, J.; Zhang, H.; Yang, X.; Lu, K.; Liang, X.
Title Constant light exposure causes oocyte meiotic defects and quality deterioration in mice Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Environmental Pollution Abbreviated Journal Environmental Pollution
Volume in press Issue Pages (down) 115467
Keywords Animals
Abstract Artificial light at night (ALAN) exposes us to prolonged illumination, that adversely affects female reproduction. However, it remains to be clarified how prolonged light exposure affects oocyte meiotic maturation and quality. To this end, we exposed female mice to a constant light (CL) of 250 lux for different durations. Our findings showed that CL exposure for 7 weeks reduced the oocyte maturation rate. Meanwhile, CL exposure caused greater abnormalities in spindle assembly and chromosome alignment and a higher rate of oocyte aneuploidy than the regular light dark cycle. CL exposure also induced oxidative stress and caused mitochondrial dysfunction, which resulted in oocyte apoptosis and autophagy. Notably, our results showed that CL exposure reduced the levels of α-tubulin acetylation, DNA methylation at 5mC, RNA methylation at m6A and histone methylation at H3K4me2 but increased the levels of histone methylation at H3K27me2 in oocytes. In summary, our findings demonstrate that constant bright light exposure causes oocyte meiotic defects and reduces cytoplasmic quality. These results extend the current understanding of ALAN-mediated defects in female reproduction.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0269-7491 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3101
Permanent link to this record