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Author Zhao, M.; Zhou, Y.; Li, X.; Cheng, W.; Zhou, C.; Ma, T.; Li, M.; Huang, K.
Title Mapping urban dynamics (1992–2018) in Southeast Asia using consistent nighttime light data from DMSP and VIIRS Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Remote Sensing of Environment Abbreviated Journal Remote Sensing of Environment
Volume 248 Issue Pages (down) 111980
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract The long-term urban dynamics at regional and global scales is essential to understanding the urbanization processes and environmental consequences for providing better scientific insights and effective decision-making. The time series of consistent nighttime light (NTL) data generated by integrating the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program-Operational Linescane System (DMSP-OLS) and the Suomi National Polar-Orbiting Partnership Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (NPP-VIIRS) provide a longer consistent record of the nightscape beyond a single dataset for monitoring urban dynamics. In this study, we developed a new framework based on the spatial variation of NTL gradient (SVNG) to map urban dynamics in Southeast Asia using the consistent NTL data (1992–2018). First, we identified the potential urban clusters in the region using the cluster-based segmentation approach in 2018. Second, we applied the SVNG framework in each potential urban cluster to extract the initial annual urban extent from corresponding time-series NTL images (1992–2018). Finally, we performed a temporal consistency check on the initial urban extent to obtain the final urban sequence in Southeast Asia. The evaluation on the spatiotemporal patterns and consistency of urban dynamics using other urban products indicates that the SVNG framework can effectively capture the urban dynamics in areas with different development levels and patterns. Moreover, we investigated urban dynamics in Southeast Asia at the local, national, and regional scales. This study opens new research avenues for monitoring and understanding the long-term urban dynamics and the pathways of urban growth from local to global scales.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0034-4257 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3114
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Author Xie, C.; Zhu, H.; Chen, S.; Wen, Y.; Jin, L.; Zhang, L.; Tong, J.; Shen, Y.
Title Chronic retinal injury induced by white LED light with different correlated color temperatures as determined by microarray analyses of genome-wide expression patterns in mice Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Journal of Photochemistry and Photobiology. B, Biology Abbreviated Journal J Photochem Photobiol B
Volume 210 Issue Pages (down) 111977
Keywords Animals; Vision; Autophagy; Cct; Expression profile microarray; Genome-wide; Led; Retinal photoreceptor degeneration; Ubiquitin
Abstract Widely used white light-emitting diodes (LEDs) currently deliver higher levels of blue light than conventional domestic light sources. The high intensity of the blue component is the main source of concern regarding possible health risks of LED to chronic light toxicity to the retina. Therefore, we analyzed retinal injury and genome-wide changes in gene expression induced by white LED light with different correlated color temperatures (CCTs) in a mouse model. Balb/c mice (10 weeks old) were exposed to LED light with CCTs of 2954, 5624, and 7378 K, at different illuminance levels (250, 500, 1000, and 3000 lx) and for different exposure times (7, 14, and 28 days). Hematoxylin and eosin staining revealed that exposure to 7378 K light at 250 lx for 28 days resulted in a significant reduction of outer nuclear layer (ONL) nuclei, whereas 2954 K light at <3000 lx led to only a mild reduction in the number of ONL nuclei. In addition, 5624 and 7378 K light at 3000 lx resulted in a significant increase in TUNEL-positive apoptotic nuclei, which was not found at an illuminance of 1000 lx. Genome-wide expression analyses showed that, compared to a control group, there were 121 upregulated differentially expressed genes (DEGs) and 458 downregulated DEGs found in the 7378 K group, and 59 upregulated and only 4 downregulated DEGs in the 2954 K group. Gene ontology (GO) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) enrichment analyses showed that the DEGs were involved in 341 GO terms and 16 related pathways for the 7378 K group and in 12 GO terms and 7 related pathways for the 2954 K group. Signal pathways related to ubiquitin potentially played an important role in light-induced retinal degeneration. Furthermore, retinal immunohistochemistry (IHC) indicated downregulation of ubiquitin and autophagy function caused by 7378 K light. Taken together, these results indicate that retinal injury in the mice induced by white LED light occurred in a CCT-dependent manner, and that light with a higher CCT was more likely to reduce ONL nuclei; however, the apoptosis pathway may not be the only mechanism involved. Based on genome-wide expression analyses and retinal IHC, the ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis signal pathway may have participated in the induction retinal degeneration.
Address Department of Ophthalmology, First Affiliated Hospital, College of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang, China. Electronic address: idrshen@zju.edu.com
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1011-1344 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:32738749 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3086
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Author Lynn, K.D.; Tummon Flynn, P.; Manriquez, K.; Manriquez, P.H.; Pulgar, J.; Duarte, C.; Quijon, P.A.
Title Artificial light at night alters the settlement of acorn barnacles on a man-made habitat in Atlantic Canada Type Journal Article
Year 2021 Publication Marine Pollution Bulletin Abbreviated Journal Mar Pollut Bull
Volume 163 Issue Pages (down) 111928
Keywords Animals; ALAN plates; Atlantic Canada; Semibalanus balanoides; Settlement
Abstract Human growth has caused an unprecedented increase in artificial light at night (ALAN). In coastal habitats, many species rely on day/night cycles to regulate various aspects of their life history and these cycles can be altered by this stressor. This study assessed the influence of ALAN on the early (cyprid) and late (spat) settlement stages of the acorn barnacle Semibalanus balanoides, a species widely distributed in natural and man-made coastal habitats of the North Atlantic. A newly designed settlement plate, originally for studies in rocky intertidal habitats in the southeast Pacific, was adapted to measure settlement rates on man-made habitats -wharf seawalls- located in Atlantic Canada. Plates equipped with a small LED diode powered by an internal battery (ALAN plates) were used to quantify settlement rates in comparison to plates lacking a light source (controls). These plates were deployed for 6 d in the mid-intertidal levels, where adult barnacles were readily visible. ALAN and control plates collected large number of settlers and showed to be suitable for this type of man-made habitats. The number of early settlers (cyprids) did not differ between plates but the number of late settlers (spat) was significantly lower in ALAN plates than in controls. These results suggest that light pollution has little influence on the early stages of the acorn barnacle settlement but is clearly detrimental to its late stages. As barnacles dominate in many natural and man-made hard substrates, it is likely that ALAN also has indirect effects on community structure.
Address Department of Biology, University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, PE, Canada. Electronic address: pquijon@upei.ca
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0025-326X ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:33418341 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3238
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Author Li, M.; Koks, E.; Taubenböck, H.; van Vliet, J.
Title Continental-scale mapping and analysis of 3D building structure Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Remote Sensing of Environment Abbreviated Journal Remote Sensing of Environment
Volume 245 Issue Pages (down) 111859
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract Urban land use is often characterized based on the presence of built-up land, while the land use intensity of different locations is ignored. This narrow focus is at least partially due to a lack of data on the vertical dimension of urban land. The potential of Earth observation data to fill this gap has already been shown, but this has not yet been applied at large spatial scales. This study aims to map urban 3D building structure, i.e. building footprint, height, and volume, for Europe, the US, and China using random forest models. Our models perform well, as indicated by R2 values of 0.90 for building footprint, 0.81 for building height, and 0.88 for building volume, for all three case regions combined. In our multidimensional input variables, we find that built-up density derived from the Global Urban Footprint (GUF) is the most important variable for estimating building footprint, while backscatter intensity of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) is the most important variable for estimating building height. A combination of the two is essential to estimate building volume. Our analysis further highlights the heterogeneity of 3D building structure across space. Specifically, buildings in China tend to be taller on average (10.35 m) compared to Europe (7.37 m) and the US (6.69 m). At the same time, the building volume per capita in China is lowest, with 302.3 m3 per capita, while Europe and the US show estimates of 404.6 m3 and 565.4 m3, respectively. The results of this study (3D building structure data for Europe, the US, and China) are publicly available, and can be used for further analysis of urban environment, spatial planning, and land use projections.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0034-4257 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2918
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Author Wang, J.; Zhou, M.; Xu, X.; Roudini, S.; Sander, S.P.; Pongetti, T.J.; Miller, S.D.; Reid, J.S.; Hyer, E.; Spurr, R.
Title Development of a nighttime shortwave radiative transfer model for remote sensing of nocturnal aerosols and fires from VIIRS Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Remote Sensing of Environment Abbreviated Journal Remote Sensing of Environment
Volume 241 Issue Pages (down) 111727
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract The launch of the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) on board the Sumo-NPP satellite in 2011 ushered in a new era of using visible light and shortwave radiation at night to characterize aerosol and fire distributions from space. In order to exploit the full range of unprecedented observational capabilities of VIIRS, we have developed a nighttime shortwave radiative transfer model capability in the UNified and Linearized Radiative Transfer Model (UNL-VRTM). This capability is based on the use of additional source functions to treat illumination from the Moon, from fires, and from artificial lights. We have applied this model to address fundamental questions associated with the VIIRS sensing of aerosol and fire at night. Detailed description of model developments and validation (either directly with surface measurements of lunar spectra or indirectly through cross validation) are presented. Our analysis reveals that: (a) when convolution with the broad-range (500–900 nm) relative spectral response (RSR) function of the VIIRS Day-Night Band (DNB) is omitted, AOD retrieval from the DNB have uncertainties up to a factor of two in conditions with low or moderate AOD (<0.5 in mid-visible); (b) using a wavelength independent spectrum for the surface illumination source can lead to an AOD bias of −10% over surfaces illuminated by light-emitting diodes and fluorescent lamps, and −30% illuminated by high-pressure sodium lamps; and (c) a DNB-equivalent narrow band for AOD retrieval over the surfaces illuminated by the three types of bulbs studied in this paper is found to be centered at 585 nm at which the look-up table can be generated for AOD retrieval from DNB. Furthermore, while uncertainty in AOD retrievals from the DNB decreases as AOD increases, fire characterization can be affected by AOD; for a smoke-scenario AOD of 2.0, the DNB and SWIR (1.6 μm) radiances can be reduced by 50% depending on the fire area fraction and temperature within VIIRS pixel. DNB is overall more sensitive to smaller and cooler fires than SWIR and can be used to retrieve AOD over bright surfaces. Finally, three-dimensional (3D) radiative transfer effects and the non-collimated nature of most artificial light sources are neglected in this 1D radiative transfer (plane-parallel) model, resulting in possibly large uncertainties (e.g., the inability to reproduce side-illumination of clouds by city lights) that should be studied in future.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0034-4257 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2863
Permanent link to this record