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Author Batra, T.; Malik, I.; Prabhat, A.; Bhardwaj, S.K.; Kumar, V. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Sleep in unnatural times: illuminated night negatively affects sleep and associated hypothalamic gene expressions in diurnal zebra finches Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Proceedings. Biological Sciences Abbreviated Journal Proc Biol Sci  
  Volume 287 Issue 1928 Pages (down) 20192952  
  Keywords Animals; bird; dim light at night; gene expression; hypothalamus; sleep; zebra finch  
  Abstract We investigated the effects of exposure at ecologically relevant levels of dim light at night (dLAN) on sleep and the 24 h hypothalamic expression pattern of genes involved in the circadian timing (per2, bmal1, reverb-beta, cry1, ror-alpha, clock) and sleep regulatory pathways (cytokines: tlr4, tnf-alpha, il-1beta, nos; Ca(2+)-dependent pathway: camk2, sik3, nr3a; cholinergic receptor, achm3) in diurnal female zebra finches. Birds were exposed to 12 h light (150 lux) coupled with 12 h of absolute darkness or of 5 lux dim light for three weeks. dLAN fragmented the nocturnal sleep in reduced bouts, and caused sleep loss as evidenced by reduced plasma oxalate levels. Under dLAN, the 24 h rhythm of per2, but not bmal1 or reverb-beta, showed a reduced amplitude and altered peak expression time; however, clock, ror-alpha and cry1 expressions showed an abolition of the 24 h rhythm. Decreased tlr4, il-1beta and nos, and the lack of diurnal difference in achm3 messenger RNA levels suggested an attenuated inhibition of the arousal system (hence, awake state promotion) under dLAN. Similarly, changes in camk2, sik3 and nr3a expressions suggested dLAN-effects on Ca(2+)-dependent sleep-inducing pathways. These results demonstrate dLAN-induced negative effects on sleep and associated hypothalamic molecular pathways, and provide insights into health risks of illuminated night exposures to diurnal animals.  
  Address Department of Zoology, University of Delhi, Delhi 110 007, India  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0962-8452 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:32517617 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2995  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Elgert, C.; Hopkins, J.; Kaitala, A.; Candolin, U. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Reproduction under light pollution: maladaptive response to spatial variation in artificial light in a glow-worm Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences Abbreviated Journal Proc. R. Soc. B.  
  Volume 287 Issue 1931 Pages (down) 20200806  
  Keywords Animals; glow-worms; Lampyris noctiluca; insects; maladaptive response; reproduction  
  Abstract The amount of artificial light at night is growing worldwide, impacting the behaviour of nocturnal organisms. Yet, we know little about the consequences of these behavioural responses for individual fitness and population viability. We investigated if females of the common glow-worm Lampyris noctiluca—which glow in the night to attract males—mitigate negative effects of artificial light on mate attraction by adjusting the timing and location of glowing to spatial variation in light conditions. We found females do not move away from light when exposed to a gradient of artificial light, but delay or even refrain from glowing. Further, we demonstrate that this response is maladaptive, as our field study showed that staying still when exposed to artificial light from a simulated streetlight decreases mate attraction success, while moving only a short distance from the light source can markedly improve mate attraction. These results indicate that glow-worms are unable to respond to spatial variation in artificial light, which may be a factor in their global decline. Consequently, our results support the hypothesis that animals often lack adaptive behavioural responses to anthropogenic environmental changes and underlines the importance of considering behavioural responses when investigating the effects of human activities on wildlife.  
  Address Organismal and Evolutionary Biology, University of Helsinki, PO Box 65, 00014 Helsinki, Finland; christina.elgert(at)helsinki.fi  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Royal Society Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0962-8452 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 3049  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Richardson, M.E.S.; Parkins, S.; Kaneza, I.; Dauphin, A.-C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Jet Lag Recovery and Memory Functions Are Correlated with Direct Light Effects on Locomotion Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Journal of Biological Rhythms Abbreviated Journal J Biol Rhythms  
  Volume in press Issue Pages (down) 748730420947589  
  Keywords Animals; activity; behavior; entrainment; jet lag; light therapy; masking; memory  
  Abstract Jet lag is a circadian disruption that affects millions of people, resulting, among other things, in extreme sleepiness and memory loss. The hazardous implications of such effects are evident in situations in which focus and attention are required. Remarkably, there is a limited understanding of how jet lag recovery and associated memory loss vary year round under different photoperiods. Here we show, using different cycles representing winter, summer, and equinox in male mice, that jet lag recovery and memory vary significantly with photoperiod changes. We uncover a positive correlation of acute light effects on circadian-driven locomotion (known as negative masking) with photoentrainment speed and memory enhancement during jet lag. Specifically, we show that enhancing or reducing negative masking is correlated with better or worse memory performance, respectively. This study indicates that in addition to timed-light exposure for phase shifting, the negative masking response could also be biologically relevant when designing effective treatments of jet lag.  
  Address Department of Biological Sciences, Oakwood University, Huntsville, Alabama  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0748-7304 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:32877295 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3130  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Peña-García, A.; Sędziwy, A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Optimizing Lighting of Rural Roads and Protected Areas with White Light: A Compromise among Light Pollution, Energy Savings, and Visibility Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Leukos Abbreviated Journal Leukos  
  Volume in press Issue Pages (down) 15502724.2019.1574138  
  Keywords Lighting; Energy; Skyglow; LED  
  Abstract The broad implementation of light emitting diode (LED) light sources in public lighting has become a revolution in recent years. Their low power consumption and good performance (extremely low onset time, long lifetime, high efficacy) make LEDs an optimal solution in most outdoor applications. In addition, the white light emitted by the vast majority of LEDs used in public lighting and their good color rendering improve well-being, comfort, and safety in cities, especially in commercial zones and urban centers. However, regulations on light pollution that have been developed in some countries in parallel to the introduction of LED lighting impose strong constraints to white light emission, which is present due to the higher Rayleigh scattering of short wavelengths. These regulations request filtering blue wavelengths in some protected areas and thus limit the projects to high- or low-pressure sodium sources or amber LEDs. In this work, the pros and cons of white and amber LED lighting in rural areas are analyzed and compared through simulations made on a typical rural lighting situation and considerations based on efficiency, visual performance, nonvisual effects, and light pollution. The most important conclusion is that Rayleigh scattering seems to prevail in the current considerations on light pollution, whereas other important aspects affecting safety and sustainability are are not considered. Accurate designs can decrease light pollution without constraints against white LEDs. The objective of this work is to provide evidence leading to consider light pollution from a more general perspective in the benefit of humans and the environment.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1550-2724 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2380  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Jiang, Z.; Zhai, W.; Meng, X.; Long, Y. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Identifying Shrinking Cities with NPP-VIIRS Nightlight Data in China Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Journal of Urban Planning and Development Abbreviated Journal J. Urban Plann. Dev.  
  Volume 146 Issue 4 Pages (down) 04020034  
  Keywords Remote Sensing  
  Abstract Although there has been a rapid urbanization in China since the 1980s, the simultaneous urban shrinkage phenomenon has existed for a long time. The study of shrinking cities is particularly important for China as the current urban development has changed from physical expansion to built-up area improvement. After redefining what constitutes a city (what we term a natural city), we compared the adjusted nightlight intensity of National Polar-orbiting Partnership Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (NPP-VIIRS) data between 2013 and 2016 to accurately identify shrinking cities throughout China. The results indicate that there are 2,862 redefined natural cities in China and that the total area reaches 53,275 km2, about 0.5% of the national territory. Based on this, we identified 798 shrinking cities with a total area of 13,839 km2. After analyzing the relative position of shrinking cities and internal shrinking pixels in the geometric space, the morphological characteristics of shrinking cities were systematically classified into six patterns. The majority of shrinking cities belong to scatter shrinkage, central shrinkage, and local shrinkage; only 5% are complete shrinkage; the rest are unilateral shrinkage and peripheral shrinkage. In addition, six shrinkage causes were quantitatively classified and summarized by referring to multiple-source urban data and municipal yearbooks. To enrich the methodological system for urban shrinkage, the research provides a reminder of the need to consider the other side of urbanization (i.e., dissolution of social networks) and proposes appropriate strategies and policies to address shrinkage issues.  
  Address  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0733-9488 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3065  
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