toggle visibility Search & Display Options

Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print
  Records Links
Author Ayalon, I.; de Barros Marangoni, L.F.; Benichou, J.I.C.; Avisar, D.; Levy, O. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Red Sea corals under Artificial Light Pollution at Night (ALAN) undergo oxidative stress and photosynthetic impairment Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Global Change Biology Abbreviated Journal Glob Chang Biol  
  Volume 25 Issue 12 Pages (down) 4194-4207  
  Keywords Animals; *Anthozoa; Coral Reefs; Ecosystem; Indian Ocean; Oxidative Stress; Photosynthesis; Alan; Ros; corals; light pollution; photosynthesis; physiology  
  Abstract Coral reefs represent the most diverse marine ecosystem on the planet, yet they are undergoing an unprecedented decline due to a combination of increasing global and local stressors. Despite the wealth of research investigating these stressors, Artificial Light Pollution at Night (ALAN) or “ecological light pollution” represents an emerging threat that has received little attention in the context of coral reefs, despite the potential of disrupting the chronobiology, physiology, behavior, and other biological processes of coral reef organisms. Scleractinian corals, the framework builders of coral reefs, depend on lunar illumination cues to synchronize their biological rhythms such as behavior, reproduction and physiology. While, light pollution (POL) may mask and lead de-synchronization of these biological rhythms process. To reveal if ALAN impacts coral physiology, we have studied two coral species, Acropora eurystoma and Pocillopora damicornis, from the Gulf of Eilat/Aqaba, Red Sea, which is undergoing urban development that has led to severe POL at night. Our two experimental design data revealed that corals exposed to ALAN face an oxidative stress condition, show lower photosynthesis performances measured by electron transport rate (ETR), as well as changes in chlorophyll and algae density parameters. Testing different lights such as Blue LED and White LED spectrum showed more extreme impact in comparison to Yellow LEDs on coral physiology. The finding of this work sheds light on the emerging threat of POL and the impacts on the biology and ecology of Scleractinian corals, and will help to formulate specific management implementations to mitigate its potentially harmful impacts.  
  Address Mina and Everard Goodman Faculty of Life Sciences, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat Gan, Israel  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1354-1013 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:31512309; PMCID:PMC6900201 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2809  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Bará, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Characterizing the zenithal night sky brightness in large territories: how many samples per square kilometre are needed? Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 473 Issue 3 Pages (down) 4164-4173  
  Keywords Instrumentation; atmospheric effects; light pollution; numerical methods; photometry  
  Abstract A recurring question arises when trying to characterize, by means of measurements or theoretical calculations, the zenithal night sky brightness throughout a large territory: how many samples per square kilometre are needed? The optimum sampling distance should allow reconstructing, with sufficient accuracy, the continuous zenithal brightness map across the whole region, whilst at the same time avoiding unnecessary and redundant oversampling. This paper attempts to provide some tentative answers to this issue, using two complementary tools: the luminance structure function and the Nyquist–Shannon spatial sampling theorem. The analysis of several regions of the world, based on the data from the New world atlas of artificial night sky brightness, suggests that, as a rule of thumb, about one measurement per square kilometre could be sufficient for determining the zenithal night sky brightness of artificial origin at any point in a region to within ±0.1 magV arcsec–2 (in the root-mean-square sense) of its true value in the Johnson–Cousins V band. The exact reconstruction of the zenithal night sky brightness maps from samples taken at the Nyquist rate seems to be considerably more demanding.  
  Address 1Departamento de Física Aplicada, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, E-15782 Santiago de Compostela, Galicia, Spain; salva.bara(at)usc.es  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Oxford Academic Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0035-8711 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 2164  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Eather, R.H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title DMSP calibration Type Journal Article
  Year 1979 Publication Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics Abbreviated Journal J. Geophys. Res.  
  Volume 84 Issue A8 Pages (down) 4134-4144  
  Keywords Remote Sensing  
  Abstract Although DMSP satellite data are widely used, there has been no reliable absolute calibration. Coordinated data with ground‐based photometers allow a calibration curve of film density versus 4728 N2+ intensity to be derived. The DMSP satellites (5C series) record airglow and can detect auroral forms of intensities ≥50 R of 4278 N2+. It is estimated that the 5D series satellites are capable of detecting auroras with ∼25 R of 4278 N2+.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0148-0227 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2385  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Guanglei, W.; Ngarambe, J.; Kim, G. url  doi
openurl 
  Title A Comparative Study on Current Outdoor Lighting Policies in China and Korea: A Step toward a Sustainable Nighttime Environment Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Sustainability Abbreviated Journal Sustainability  
  Volume 11 Issue 14 Pages (down) 3989  
  Keywords Lighting; Policy  
  Abstract Light pollution is a serious environmental issue with many adverse effects on human health and the ecosystem as a whole. Accordingly, many countries have issued laws and regulations to limit the effects of artificial lighting at night (ALAN). The Republic of Korea and China are among the few countries that have drafted laws to curb light pollution. In the present study, we gathered data related to light pollution regulations and ordinances in both China and Korea. We then carried out a comparative analysis of the light pollution laws of both countries. We found that, although the two countries share a similar socio-economic background, they have different approaches to the issue of light pollution. The information provided in this study serves as a guideline to countries that wish to develop their own light pollution policies. In addition, the conclusions provided in our study offer potential improvements to local and national light pollution policies in both the Republic of Korea and China.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2071-1050 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2602  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Sȩdziwy, A.; Basiura, A.; Wojnicki, I. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Roadway Lighting Retrofit: Environmental and Economic Impact of Greenhouse Gases Footprint Reduction Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Sustainability Abbreviated Journal Sustainability  
  Volume 10 Issue 11 Pages (down) 3925  
  Keywords Economics; Lighting  
  Abstract Roadway lighting retrofit is a process continuously developed in urban environments due to both installation aging and technical upgrades. The spectacular example is replacing the high intensity discharge (HID) lamps, usually high pressure sodium (HPS) ones, with the sources based on light-emitting diodes (LED). The main focus in the related research was put on energy efficiency of installations and corresponding financial benefits. In this work, we extend those considerations analyzing how lighting optimization impacts greenhouse gas (GHG) emission reduction and what are the resultant financial benefits expressed in terms of emission allowances prices. Our goal is twofold: (i) obtaining a quantitative assessment of how a GHG footprint depends on a technological scope of modernization of a city HPS-based lighting system; and (ii) showing that the costs of such a modernization can be decreased by up to 10% thanks to a lowered CO 2 emission volume. Moreover, we identify retrofit patterns yielding the most substantial environmental impact.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2071-1050 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2772  
Permanent link to this record
Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print

Save Citations:
Export Records: