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Author Suk, J.Y.; Walter, R.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title New nighttime roadway lighting documentation applied to public safety at night: A case study in San Antonio, Texas Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Sustainable Cities and Society Abbreviated Journal Sustainable Cities and Society  
  Volume 46 Issue Pages (down) 101459  
  Keywords Lighting; Public Safety; Security; Planning  
  Abstract Built environment and public safety professionals view street lighting as an important factor in improving the well-being of the community at night. Extant research that has examined the relationship between street lighting and public safety has found inconclusive or mixed results and has called for more extensive lighting metrics. Using new lighting measurement technologies and geographic information science, this study builds on previous work to demonstrate new metrics to consider when evaluating public safety, specifically crime and traffic accidents. Downtown San Antonio, Texas is used as a case study to explore illuminance levels on roadways and the driver’s eye, and how these metrics can be used to understand the lighting characteristics of where crime and traffic accidents occur. The findings indicate that the central downtown district in San Antonio has higher illuminance levels than the existing roadway lighting guidelines while the residential downtown neighborhoods have insufficient light levels. Statistical analysis reveals that roadway illuminance levels are higher in areas where no crime occurred and driver’s eye illuminance levels are lower in areas with no traffic accidents. The findings prove the usefulness of new lighting documentation techniques and support the importance of considering illuminance metrics when assessing crime and traffic accidents at night.  
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  ISSN 2210-6707 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2191  
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Author Benito, B.; Guillamón, M.-D.; Martínez-Córdoba, P.-J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Determinants of efficiency improvement in the Spanish public lighting sector Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Utilities Policy Abbreviated Journal Utilities Policy  
  Volume 64 Issue Pages (down) 101026  
  Keywords Lighting; Economics  
  Abstract This research analyzes the factors that can improve the efficiency of public lighting. First, the annual and inter-annual efficiency levels are calculated. Second, the effects of a set of environmental variables on these efficiency levels are checked with a truncated regression model. The results show that public management is more efficient than private or mixed management. Higher tourism, stronger local governments, and more hours of sunlight appear to improve efficiency. Local governments with the highest budgetary revenues and the most urbanized area experience the greatest improvement in efficiency year after year.  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0957-1787 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2840  
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Author Shen, J.; Tower, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of light on aging and longevity Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Ageing Research Reviews Abbreviated Journal Ageing Res Rev  
  Volume 53 Issue Pages (down) 100913  
  Keywords Human Health; Review; Aging; longevity  
  Abstract Increasing evidence suggests an important role for light in regulation of aging and longevity. UV radiation is a mutagen that can promote aging and decrease longevity. In contrast, NIR light has shown protective effects in animal disease models. In invertebrates, visible light can shorten or extend lifespan, depending on the intensity and wavelength composition. Visible light also impacts human health, including retina function, sleep, cancer and psychiatric disorders. Possible mechanisms of visible light include: controlling circadian rhythms, inducing oxidative stress, and acting through the retina to affect neuronal circuits and systems. Changes in artificial lighting (e.g., LEDs) may have implications for human health. It will be important to further explore the mechanisms of how light affects aging and longevity, and how light affects human health.  
  Address Molecular and Computational Biology Program, Department of Biological Sciences, University of Southern California, Los Angeles CA 90089-2910, United States  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1568-1637 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:31154014 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2514  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Kosicki, J.Z. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Anthropogenic activity expressed as ‘artificial light at night’ improves predictive density distribution in bird populations Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Ecological Complexity Abbreviated Journal Ecological Complexity  
  Volume 41 Issue Pages (down) 100809  
  Keywords Remote Sensing; Animals; Ecology  
  Abstract Artificial Light At Night (ALAN) is one of the most important anthropogenic environmental components that affects biodiversity worldwide. Despite extensive knowledge on ALAN, being a measure of human activity that directly impacts numerous aspects of animal behaviour, such as orientation and distribution, little is known about its effects on density distribution on a large spatial scale. That is why we decided to explore by means of the Species Distribution Modelling approach (SDM) how ALAN as one of 33 predictors determines farmland and forest bird species densities. In order to safeguard study results from any inconsistency caused by the chosen method, we used two approaches, i.e. the Generalised Additive Model (GAM) and the Random Forest (RF). Within each approach, we developed two models for two bird species, the Black woodpecker and the European stonechat: the first with ALAN, and the second without ALAN as an additional predictor. Having used out-of-bag procedures in the RF approach, information-theoretic criteria for the GAM, and evaluation models based on an independent dataset, we demonstrated that models with ALAN had higher predictive density power than models without it. The Black woodpecker definitely and linearly avoids anthropogenic activity, defined by the level of artificial light, while the European stonechat tolerates human activity to some degree, especially in farmland habitats. What is more, a heuristic analysis of predictive maps based on models without ALAN shows that both species reach high densities in regions where they are deemed rare. Hence, the study proves that urbanisation processes, which can be reflected by ALAN, are among key predictors necessary for developing Species Density Distribution Models for both farmland and forest bird species.  
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  ISSN 1476945X ISBN Medium  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2776  
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Author Verra, D.M.; Sajdak, B.S.; Merriman, D.K.; Hicks, D. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Diurnal rodents as pertinent animal models of human retinal physiology and pathology Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Progress in Retinal and eye Research Abbreviated Journal Prog Retin Eye Res  
  Volume in press Issue Pages (down) 100776  
  Keywords Animals; Vision  
  Abstract This presentation will survey the retinal architecture, advantages, and limitations of several lesser-known rodent species that provide a useful diurnal complement to rats and mice. These diurnal rodents also possess unusually cone-rich photoreceptor mosaics that facilitate the study of cone cells and pathways. Species to be presented include principally the Sudanian Unstriped Grass Rat and Nile Rat (Arvicanthis spp.), the Fat Sand Rat (Psammomys obesus), the degu (Octodon degus) and the 13-lined ground squirrel (Ictidomys tridecemlineatus). The retina and optic nerve in several of these species demonstrate unusual resilience in the face of neuronal injury, itself an interesting phenomenon with potential translational value.  
  Address Department of Neurobiology of Rhythms, Institut des Neurosciences Cellulaires et Integratives (INCI), CNRS UPR 3212, Strasbourg, France. Electronic address: photoreceptor67@hotmail.com  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1350-9462 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:31499165 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2676  
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