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Author Hong, F.; Pan, S.; Xu, P.; Xue, T.; Wang, J.; Guo, Y.; Jia, L.; Qiao, X.; Li, L.; Zhai, Y.
Title Melatonin Orchestrates Lipid Homeostasis through the Hepatointestinal Circadian Clock and Microbiota during Constant Light Exposure Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Cells Abbreviated Journal Cells
Volume 9 Issue 2 Pages (up) in press
Keywords Animals; Cells; Lan; hepatointestinal; lipid homeostasis; melatonin; microbiota
Abstract Misalignment between natural light rhythm and modern life activities induces disruption of the circadian rhythm. It is mainly evident that light at night (LAN) interferes with the human endocrine system and contributes to the increasing rates of obesity and lipid metabolic disease. Maintaining hepatointestinal circadian homeostasis is vital for improving lipid homeostasis. Melatonin is a chronobiotic substance that plays a main role in stabilizing bodily rhythm and has shown beneficial effects in protecting against obesity. Based on the dual effect of circadian rhythm regulation and antiobesity, we tested the effect of melatonin in mice under constant light exposure. Exposure to 24-h constant light (LL) increased weight and insulin resistance compared with those of the control group (12-h light-12-h dark cycle, LD), and simultaneous supplementation in the melatonin group (LLM) ameliorated this phenotype. Constant light exposure disturbed the expression pattern of a series of transcripts, including lipid metabolism, circadian regulation and nuclear receptors in the liver. Melatonin also showed beneficial effects in improving lipid metabolism and circadian rhythm homeostasis. Furthermore, the LL group had increased absorption and digestion of lipids in the intestine as evidenced by the elevated influx of lipids in the duodenum and decrease in the efflux of lipids in the jejunum. More interestingly, melatonin ameliorated the gut microbiota dysbiosis and improved lipid efflux from the intestine. Thus, these findings offer a novel clue regarding the obesity-promoting effect attributed to LAN and suggest a possibility for obesity therapy by melatonin in which melatonin could ameliorate rhythm disorder and intestinal dysbiosis.
Address Key Laboratory for Cell Proliferation and Regulation Biology of State Education Ministry, College of Life Sciences, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875, China
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2073-4409 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:32093272 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2854
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Author Kim, D.E.; Yoon, J.Y.
Title Factors that Influence Sleep among Residents in Long-Term Care Facilities Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health Abbreviated Journal Int J Environ Res Public Health
Volume 17 Issue 6 Pages (up)
Keywords Human Health; aged; environment; long-term care; sleep
Abstract Long-term care residents often experience sleep disturbances as they are vulnerable to a variety of physical, psychosocial, and environmental factors that contribute to sleep disturbances. However, few studies have examined the combined impact of multiple factors on sleep among long-term care residents. This study aimed to identify the factors that influence sleep efficiency and sleep quality based on a modified senescent sleep model. A total of 125 residents were recruited from seven long-term care facilities in South Korea. Sleep patterns and sleep quality were collected using 3-day sleep logs and the Minimal Insomnia Screening Scale for Korean adults (KMISS), respectively. The mean sleep efficiency was 84.6% and the mean score on sleep quality was 15.25. A multiple linear regression analysis showed that greater dependence in activities of daily living (ADL), higher pain, and light at night were related to lower sleep efficiency. Higher pain and fatigue, less activity time, noise and light at night, and lower nighttime staffing levels were related to poorer sleep quality. This study highlights that psychosocial and environmental factors as well as physical factors could influence sleep for long-term care residents. Our findings could be foundational evidence for multi-faceted sleep intervention program development in long-term care settings.
Address Research Institute of Nursing Science and College of Nursing, Seoul National University, Seoul 03080, Korea
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1660-4601 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:32183274 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2861
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Author Bumgarner, J.R.; Walker, W.H. 2nd; Liu, J.A.; Walton, J.C.; Nelson, R.J.
Title Dim light at night exposure induces cold hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia in male mice Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Neuroscience Abbreviated Journal Neuroscience
Volume in press Issue Pages (up)
Keywords Animals; Allodynia; Hyperalgesia; Light at Night; Neuroinflammation; Opioid; Pain
Abstract The growing presence of artificial lighting across the globe presents a number of challenges to human and ecological health despite its societal benefits. Exposure to artificial light at night, a seemingly innocuous aspect of modern life, disrupts behavior and physiological functions. Specifically, light at night induces neuroinflammation, which is implicated in neuropathic and nociceptive pain states, including hyperalgesia and allodynia. Because of its influence on neuroinflammation, we investigated the effects of dim light at night exposure on pain responsiveness in male mice. In this study, mice exposed to four days of dim (5 lux) light at night exhibited cold hyperalgesia. Further, after 28 days of exposure, mice exhibited both cold hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia. No heat/hot hyperalgesia was observed in this experiment. Altered nociception in mice exposed to dim light at night was concurrent with upregulated interleukin-6 and nerve growth factor mRNA expression in the medulla and elevated mu-opioid receptor mRNA expression in the periaqueductal gray region of the brain. The current results support the relationship between disrupted circadian rhythms and altered pain sensitivity. In summary, we observed that dim light at night induces cold hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia, potentially through elevated central neuroinflammation and dysregulation of the endogenous opioid system.
Address Department of Neuroscience, Rockefeller Neuroscience Institute, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV, 26506 United States
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0306-4522 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:32201267 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2864
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Author Andreatta, G.; Tessmar-Raible, K.
Title The still dark side of the moon: molecular mechanisms of lunar-controlled rhythms and clocks Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Journal of Molecular Biology Abbreviated Journal J Mol Biol
Volume in press Issue Pages (up)
Keywords Review; Animals; Hormones; Lunar rhythms; Physiology; Proteome; Transcriptome
Abstract Starting with the beginning of the last century, a multitude of scientific studies has documented that the lunar cycle times behaviors and physiology in many organisms. It is plausible that even the first life forms adapted to the different rhythms controlled by the moon. Consistently, many marine species exhibit lunar rhythms, and also the number of documented “lunar-rhythmic” terrestrial species is increasing. Organisms follow diverse lunar geophysical/astronomical rhythms, which differ significantly in terms of period length: from hours (circalunidian and circatidal rhythms) to days (circasemilunar and circalunar cycles). Evidence for internal circatital and circalunar oscillators exists for a range of species based on past behavioral studies, but those species with well-documented behaviorally free-running lunar rhythms are not typically used for molecular studies. Thus, the underlying molecular mechanisms are largely obscure: the dark side of the moon. Here we review findings which start to connect molecular pathways with moon-controlled physiology and behaviors. The present data indicate connections between metabolic/endocrine pathways and moon-controlled rhythms, as well as interactions between circadian and circatidal/circalunar rhythms. Moreover, recent high-throughput analyses provide useful leads towards pathways, as well as molecular markers. However, for each interpretation it is important to carefully consider the – partly substantially differing – conditions used in each experimental paradigm. In the future, it will be important to use lab experiments to delineate the specific mechanisms of the different solar- and lunar-controlled rhythms, but to also start integrating them together, as life has evolved equally long under rhythms of both sun and moon.
Address Max Perutz Labs, University of Vienna, Vienna BioCenter, Dr. Bohr-Gasse 9/4, A-1030 Vienna; Research Platform “Rhythms of Life”, University of Vienna, Vienna BioCenter, Dr. Bohr-Gasse 9/4, A-1030 Vienna. Electronic address: kristin.tessmar@mfpl.ac.at
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0022-2836 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:32198116 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2865
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Author Crespo Cuaresma, J.; Danylo, O.; Fritz, S.; Hofer, M.; Kharas, H.; Laso Bayas, J.C.
Title What do we know about poverty in North Korea? Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Palgrave Communications Abbreviated Journal Palgrave Commun
Volume 6 Issue 1 Pages (up) in press
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract Reliable quantitative information on the North Korean economy is extremely scarce. In particular, reliable income per capita and poverty figures for the country are not available. In this contribution, we provide for the first time estimates of absolute poverty rates in North Korean subnational regions based on the combination of innovative remote-sensed night-time light intensity data (monthly information for built areas) with estimated income distributions. Our results, which are robust to the use of different methods to approximate the income distribution in the country, indicate that the share of persons living in extreme poverty in North Korea may be larger than previously thought. We estimate a poverty rate for the country of around 60% in 2018 and a high volatility in the dynamics of income at the national level in North Korea for the period 2012–2018. Income per capita estimates tend to decline significantly from 2012 to 2015 and present a recovery since 2016. The subnational estimates of income and poverty reveal a change in relative dynamics since the second half of the 2012–2018 period. The first part of the period is dominated by divergent dynamics in income across regions, while the second half reveals convergence in regional income.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2055-1045 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2866
Permanent link to this record