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Author Li, X.; Zhao, L.; Li, D.; Xu, H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Mapping Urban Extent Using Luojia 1-01 Nighttime Light Imagery Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Sensors (Basel, Switzerland) Abbreviated Journal Sensors (Basel)  
  Volume 18 Issue 11 Pages  
  Keywords Instrumentation; Remote Sensing  
  Abstract Luojia 1-01 satellite, launched on 2 June 2018, provides a new data source of nighttime light at 130 m resolution and shows potential for mapping urban extent. In this paper, using Luojia 1-01 and VIIRS nighttime light imagery, we compared several methods for extracting urban areas, including Human Settlement Index (HSI), Simple Thresholding Segmentation (STS) and SVM supervised classification. According to the accuracy assessment, the HSI method using LJ1-01 data had the best performance in urban extent extraction, which presented the largest Kappa Coefficient value, 0.834, among all the results. For the urban areas extracted by VIIRS based HSI method, the largest Kappa Coefficient value was 0.772. In contrast, the largest Kappa Coefficient values obtained by STS method were 0.79 and 0.7512 respectively when using LJ1-01 and VIIRS data, while for SVM method the values were 0.7829 and 0.7486 when using Landsat-LJ and Landsat-VIIRS composite data respectively. The experimented results demonstrated that the utilization of nighttime light imagery can largely improve the accuracy of urban extent extraction and LJ1-01 data, with a higher resolution and more abundant spatial information, can lead to better identification results than its predecessors.  
  Address Key Laboratory of the Ministry of Land and Resources for Law Evaluation Engineering, Wuhan 430074, China. xuhuimin1985_2008@163.com  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1424-8220 ISBN (down) Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:30380616 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2056  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Vetter, C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Circadian disruption: What do we actually mean? Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication The European Journal of Neuroscience Abbreviated Journal Eur J Neurosci  
  Volume in press Issue Pages in press  
  Keywords Human Health; Review  
  Abstract The circadian system regulates physiology and behavior. Acute challenges to the system, such as those experienced during travel across time zones, will eventually result in re-synchronization to the local environmental time cues, but this re-synchronization is oftentimes accompanied by adverse short-term consequences. When such challenges are experienced chronically, adaptation may not be achieved, as for example in the case of rotating night shift workers. The transient and chronic disturbance of the circadian system is most frequently referred to as “circadian disruption”, but many other terms have been proposed and used to refer to similar situations. It is now beyond doubt that the circadian system contributes to health and disease, emphasizing the need for clear terminology when describing challenges to the circadian system and their consequences. The goal of this review is to provide an overview of the terms used to describe disruption of the circadian system, discuss proposed quantifications of disruption in experimental and observational settings with a focus on human research, and highlight limitations and challenges of currently available tools. For circadian research to advance as a translational science, clear, operationalizable, and scalable quantifications of circadian disruption are key, as they will enable improved assessment and reproducibility of results, ideally ranging from mechanistic settings, including animal research, to large-scale randomized clinical trials. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.  
  Address Department of Integrative Physiology, University of Colorado Boulder, Boulder, CO, USA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0953-816X ISBN (down) Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:30402904 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2057  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Gaston, K.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Lighting up the nighttime Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Science (New York, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal Science  
  Volume 362 Issue 6416 Pages 744-746  
  Keywords Commentary  
  Abstract Among the most visually compelling images of the whole Earth have been those created using data obtained at night by astronauts or from satellites. The proliferation in use of electric lighting—including from industrial, commercial, municipal, and domestic sources—is striking. It sketches the spatial distribution of much of the human population, outlining a substantial proportion of the world's coastline, highlighting a multitude of towns and cities, and drawing the major highways that connect them. The data embodied in these nighttime images have been used to estimate and map levels of energy use, urbanization, and economic activity. They have also been key in focusing attention on the environmental impacts of the artificial light at night itself. Explicit steps need to be taken to limit these impacts, which vary according to the intensity, spectrum, spatial extent, and temporal dynamics of this lighting.  
  Address Environment and Sustainability Institute, University of Exeter, Penryn, Cornwall TR10 9FE, UK. k.j.gaston@exeter.ac.uk  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0036-8075 ISBN (down) Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:30442788 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2058  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Shima, J.S.; Swearer, S.E. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Moonlight enhances growth in larval fish Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Ecology Abbreviated Journal Ecology  
  Volume in press Issue Pages  
  Keywords Animals; Moonlight  
  Abstract Moonlight mediates trophic interactions and shapes the evolution of life-history strategies for nocturnal organisms. Reproductive cycles and important life-history transitions for many marine organisms coincide with moon phases, but few studies consider the effects of moonlight on pelagic larvae at sea. We evaluated effects of moonlight on growth of pelagic larvae of a temperate reef fish using 'master chronologies' of larval growth constructed from age-independent daily increment widths recorded in otoliths of 321 individuals. We found that daily growth rates of fish larvae were enhanced by lunar illumination after controlling for the positive influence of temperature and the negative influence of cloud cover. Collectively, these results indicate that moonlight enhances growth rates of larval fish. This pattern is likely the result of moonlight's combined effects on foraging efficiency and suppression of diel migrations of mesopelagic predators, and has the potential to drive evolution of marine life histories. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.  
  Address School of BioSciences, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, 3010, Australia  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0012-9658 ISBN (down) Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:30422325 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2059  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Min, J.-young; Min, K.-bok url  doi
openurl 
  Title Outdoor Artificial Nighttime Light and Use of Hypnotic Medications in Older Adults: A Population-Based Cohort Study Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine Abbreviated Journal Jcsm  
  Volume 14 Issue 11 Pages 1903-1910  
  Keywords Human Health; Remote Sensing  
  Abstract Study Objectives

Outdoor artificial nighttime light is increasingly recognized as a form of environmental pollution. Excessive nighttime light exposure, whether from indoor or outdoor sources, has been associated with a number of deleterious effects on human health. We performed a population-based cohort study in South Korea to assess the possible association between outdoor nocturnal lighting and insomnia in older adults, as measured by prescriptions for hypnotic drugs.

Methods

This study used data from the 2002–2013 National Health Insurance Service-National Sample Cohort (NHIS-NSC), and a total of 52,027 adults who were age 60 years or older were included in the study. Light data were based on satellite mapping of artificial light. The usage data of two hypnotic drugs, zolpidem (N05CF02) and triazolam (N05CD05), were extracted from the NHIS-NSC records.

Results

Of the 52,027 patients in this cohort, 11,738 (22%) had prescriptions for hypnotic drugs. Increasing outdoor artificial nighttime light exposure (stratified by quartile) was associated with an increased prevalence of hypnotic prescriptions and daily dose intake. Compared with individuals in the lowest quartile 1, the regression coefficients for prescription days and daily defined doses of all hypnotic drugs and certain hypotonic drugs were significantly higher among those living in areas with higher outdoor artificial nighttime light (quartiles 2 through 4).

Conclusions

Outdoor artificial nighttime light exposure was significantly associated with prescription of hypnotic drugs in older adults. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that outdoor artificial nighttime light may cause sleep disturbances.
 
  Address  
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  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1550-9389 ISBN (down) Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2060  
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