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Author Chen, Z., Yu, B., Ta, N., Shi, K., Yang, C., Wang, C., Zhao, X., Deng, S., & Wu, J.
Title Delineating Seasonal Relationships Between Suomi NPP-VIIRS Nighttime Light and Human Activity Across Shanghai, China Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication IEEE Journal of Selected Topics in Applied Earth Observations and Remote Sensing Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages 1-9
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract The nighttime light (NTL) remote-sensing data have been widely applied in several applications for analyzing the urbanization process. The relationship between NTL intensity and human activity becomes a solid foundation for the applications using NTL data. However, there is no research, so far, revealing how the human activity seasonality could impact the seasonal change of NTL intensity. In this paper, a comparative analysis, box plot, and random forest algorithm were applied to NTL remote-sensing data and points of interest (POIs) data within Shanghai, China. The results show that in spring and autumn, the NTL is much brighter than that in summer and winter, especially within high human activity density area. The NTL intensity can be partly (approximately 40%) explained as the joint effects of the five POI categories. By analyzing the contributions of each POI category to NTL intensity, we found that the National Polar-Orbiting Partnership-Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (NPP-VIIRS) could be used to dig more information about gross domestic product (GDP) and traffic-based applications with consideration of NTL seasonality.
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Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2542
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Author Sankhla, M., S., Sharma, K., & Kumar, R.
Title Impacts on Human & Environment of Night Time Light Pollution Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Galore International Journal of Applied Sciences and Humanities Abbreviated Journal
Volume 3 Issue 2 Pages
Keywords Human Health; Ecology; Review
Abstract Light is chief source of human life. Humans are too much depended on light. High amount of use light are causing pollution to be a growing problem, however few research studies have addressed probable effects of light pollution on wildlife& humans. Astrophysicists consider light pollution to be a growing problem on worldwide. The night-sky illumination is originated to be effected by human factors such as land utilization and population density of the observation sites, together with meteorological and/or environmental factors. The interest in light pollution has been growing in many fields of science, extending from the traditional field of astronomy to atmospheric physics, environmental sciences, natural sciences and human sciences.
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Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2543
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Author Garstang, R.H.
Title Light Pollution at Mount Wilson: The Effects of Population Growth and Air Pollution Type Journal Article
Year 2000 Publication Memorie della Società Astronomia Italiana Abbreviated Journal
Volume 71 Issue 1 Pages
Keywords Skyglow
Abstract This is the first part of a study of the historical growth of light pollution at Mount Wilson Observatory. The night sky brightness at Mount Wilson due to light pollution from Los Angeles basin was calculated for the years 1910 to 1990, neglecting changes in lighting technology, and without any air pollution ('smog'). The very large effect of population growth is shown. We made a simple extension of our night sky brightness program to include a layer of smog. Two possibilities of constant density and finite thickness. The ground level density is determined by the visibility. We assume a smog layer whose density increases from zero in 1920 to appropriate values for the years from 1950. We added this layer to out model and repeated the Mount Wilson calculations. An average smog layer reduces the visual brightness at the present time by about 6 percent.
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Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2544
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Author Garstang, R. H.
Title Predictions of Future Light Pollution for Ground-Based Observatory Sites Type Journal Article
Year 1989 Publication Bulletin of the American Astronomical Society Abbreviated Journal
Volume 21 Issue Pages 759
Keywords Skyglow
Abstract In a paper now in press (P.A.S.P. March 1989) we have given details of an improved model for calculating the light pollution caused by one or more cities at an observatory or prospective observatory site. The principal difference in the new model from our earlier one is the inclusion of the effects of the curvature of the Earth, which are significant for the large cities at large distances from mountain observatories.
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Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2545
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Author Marín-Gómez, O.H, & MacGregor-Fors, I.
Title How Early Do Birds Start Chirping? Dawn Chorus Onset and Peak Times in a Neotropical City Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Ardeola Abbreviated Journal
Volume 66 Issue 2 Pages 327-341
Keywords Animals
Abstract Urbanisation poses important challenges for animal communication. Avian dawn choruses are a prominent component of urban soundscapes and have received attention in recent urban ecology studies. Current evidence based on comparisons of urban and non-urban sites suggest that urbanisation is associated with earlier dawn chorus singing activity. However, this phenomenon remains mainly unexplored in tropical cities. We here assessed dawn chorus onset and peak times in two contrasting conditions of the urbanisation intensity gradient (i.e., intra-urban and peri-urban forested areas) of a Neotropical city, Xalapa in Mexico, assessing relationships with noise at sunrise and artificial light at night. We found no differences in dawn chorus onset or singing peak times when contrasting intra- and peri-urban areas. However, we found non-significant trends for earlier chorus onsets and peak times with increasing noise levels. Our results show no relationship between artificial light at night and dawn chorus timing, adding evidence to recent studies showing that light pollution does not seem to be determinant in the dawn choruses of tropical birds. Further research is needed to include a wider array of urbanisation conditions and drivers of the singing routines of urban tropical birds. —Marín-Gómez, O.H. & MacGregor-Fors, I. (2019). How early do birds start chirping? Dawn chorus onset and peak times in a Neotropical city.
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Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2553
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