toggle visibility Search & Display Options

Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print
  Records Links
Author Grubisic, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Waters under Artificial Lights: Does Light Pollution Matter for Aquatic Primary Producers? Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Limnology and Oceanography Bulletin Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 27 Issue 3 Pages 76-81  
  Keywords Ecology  
  Abstract Bright night lights have become a symbol of development and prosperity in the modern world. But have you ever wondered how artificial light at night (ALAN) may be affecting living beings in our cities, and how it may be affecting us? As artificial illumination is transforming nocturnal environments around the world, light pollution associated with its use is becoming a topic of increasing interest in the scientific and public communities. Light pollution disrupts natural light regimes in many regions of the world, raising concerns about ecological and health impacts of this novel anthropogenic pressure. Most obviously, ALAN can influence night‐active animals in urban and suburban areas, and most research in this growing field focuses on terrestrial organisms such as bats, birds, and insects. Effects on aquatic ecosystems are much less known. In particular, aquatic primary producers, such as microalgae, cyanobacteria, and plants, have rarely been studied despite their critical positioning in the base of aquatic food webs and the fundamental role that light plays in their ecology. For primary producers, light is a key source of both energy and environmental information; it influences their growth, production, and community structure. ALAN has therefore a large potential to influence their communities and induce bottom‐up changes to aquatic ecosystems and ecosystem functions.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN (up) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1966  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Shirkey, R. C. url  openurl
  Title A Model for Nighttime Urban Illumination Type Journal Article
  Year 2006 Publication Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords Skyglow  
  Abstract The Army increasingly relies on night operations to accomplish its objectives. These night operations frequently require using Night Vision Goggles and other light-sensitive devices which are strongly affected by ambient lighting, a large component of which is urban. An urban illumination model is proposed for use in tactical decision aids and wargames which would allow for more accurate prediction of target acquisition ranges and increased realism in simulations. This model will build on previous research that predicts broadband brightness as a function of population and distance from the city center. Since city population and aerosols affect light distributions, the model is being extended and generalized for multiple city types and natural and man-made aerosols. An overview of the model along with future improvements will be presented.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author ARMY RESEARCH LAB WHITE SANDS MISSILE RANGE NM COMPUTATIONAL AND INFORMATION SCIENCE DIRECTORATE Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN (up) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes ADA497505 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1977  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Point, S. doi  openurl
  Title Blue Light Hazard: are exposure limit values protective enough for newborn infants? Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Radioprotection Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 53 Issue 3 Pages 219-224  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract Blue Light Hazard is an emerging concern for health of population. Nevertheless, acute exposure to blue rays from artificial light is well taken into account by normative requirements applicable to lamps engineering and risk for general population is low. There is also no evidence for a chronic effect of artificial lighting on retina for general population at radiance below exposure limit values. That said, children in the very first years of life constitute a specific population to consider. On one side, eye anatomy of very young infants is different from elder young people or adults. On the other side, infants can be in close contact with some luminous toys or night lights. This paper presents a first approach for taking into account the specific anatomy of newborn infants’ eyes in blue light hazard evaluation. Results show that differences of crystalline lens transparency, focal length and pupil diameter could induce a significantly higher retinal exposure than for adult.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN (up) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1982  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Wren, W.; Locke, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Upgraded Rig Lighting Improves Night Time Visibility While Reducing Stray Light and the Threat to Dark Skies in West Texas Type Conference Article
  Year 2015 Publication Society of Petroleum Engineers Abbreviated Journal Soc. Petrol. Engr.  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords Lighting; outdoor lighting; petroleum; oil and gas; lighting engineering  
  Abstract McDonald Observatory, part of the University of Texas at Austin, is a world-class astronomical-research facility representing hundreds of millions of dollars of public and private investment that is increasingly threatened by nighttime lighting from oil-and-gas-related activities in and around the Permian Basin. Established in the remote Davis Mountains of West Texas in 1932, the observatory is home to some of the world's largest telescopes and it has continued as a world-renowned research center. Dark night skies are crucial to its mission. Since 2010, however, the sky along the observatory's northern horizon, in the direction of the Permian Basin, has been steadily and rapidly brightening, due to new exploration for oil and gas. The pace has been accelerating: More than 2,000 applications were filed over the past year to drill in the region. In 2011, the State of Texas enacted a law that instructs the seven counties surrounding McDonald Observatory, an area covering some 28,000 square miles, to adopt outdoor lighting ordinances designed to preserve the dark night skies for ongoing astronomical research at the observatory. Most had already done so voluntarily, but additional effort is needed throughout the area to address fast-moving energy-exploration activities.

A joint project between McDonald Observatory and Pioneer Energy Services (PES) has demonstrated that many of the adverse effects of oilfield lighting can be mitigated, without jeopardizing safety, through proper shielding and aiming of light fixtures. Beginning July, 2013, PES granted the observatory access to a working rig, Pioneer Rig #29. Every time the rig moved to a new location, there was an opportunity to install shields, re-aim floodlights, and evaluate effectiveness.

This joint project demonstrated that, in many cases, nighttime visibility on the rig can be significantly improved. Many light fixtures, which had been sources of blinding glare due to of lack of shielding, poor placement, or poor aiming, were made better and safer, using optional glare shields that are offered by manufacturers for a variety of fixture models. Proper shielding and aiming of existing fixtures improves visibility and reduces wasted uplight. New lighting systems that take advantage of light-emitting-diode technology also promise better directionality, reduced fuel consumption, and darker skies overhead.

The oil-and-gas industry has been lighting its exploration and production activities in much same way for more than 100 years, with little to no consideration of environmental impacts. The opportunity exists to adopt new lighting practices and technologies that improve safety, reduce costs, and help preserve our vanishing night skies so that important ongoing scientific exploration can continue.
 
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Society of Petroleum Engineers Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN (up) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes SPE E&P Health, Safety, Security and Environmental Conference-Americas held in Denver, Colorado, USA, 16–18 March 2015 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1993  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Lystrup, D.E. url  openurl
  Title The Dark Side of the Light: Rachel Carson, Light Pollution, and a Case for Federal Regulation Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Jurimetrics Abbreviated Journal Jurimetrics  
  Volume 57 Issue 4 Pages 505-528  
  Keywords Society; law; light pollution; regulation; environmentalism  
  Abstract This comment explores the negative effects of light pollution and considers whether current levels of artificial light at night (LAN) warrant federal control by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). This study first identifies the negative effects of light pollution on human health and the environment, treatment of which aligns with the mission statement of the EPA. Light pollution comprises both a private and a public nuisance. Next, this comment assesses the effectiveness of the common law approach, local government, state government, and federal control over light pollution in this context to determine which form of governance is most effective. Then, EPA involvement through federal and state implemented plans, as well as federal regulation of manufacturing is investigated. Last, this comment considers the necessity of private action through an emerging legal reform called new governance, which emphasizes public-private approaches. The negative effects of light pollution on human health and the environment could eventually lead the EPA to assert control over the regulation of light pollution, but under the current presidential administration this is highly unlikely. The predicted lack of government action leads me to call for nongovernment organizations (NGOs) to step in and take action to privately regulate light pollution and mitigate its negative effects through certification regimes, insurance premium incentives, and corporate social responsibility until government exerts regulatory control.  
  Address Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law, Arizona State University, MC 9520 Arizona State University 111 E. Taylor Street Phoenix, AZ 85004-4467 USA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher American Bar Association Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN (up) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1995  
Permanent link to this record
Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print

Save Citations:
Export Records: