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Author Brundin, T.M.
Title Light reactions of terrestrial amphipods Type Journal Article
Year 1913 Publication Journal of Animal Behavior Abbreviated Journal Journal of Animal Behavior
Volume 3 Issue (down) 5 Pages 334-352
Keywords Animals
Abstract Investigated the responses of amphipods to light. A series of experiments were conducted to determine the mechanism of the phototactic response, and the cause of reversal in the sense of phototaxis. Varying numbers of Ss were tested on reaction time to light and heat. The more terrestrial forms among the amphipoda were more positive. Concluded that the conditions which brought about the positive phototaxis were the same, as prevailed in the environment of the more terrestrial amphipoda. Heat and dryness favored positive reactions, while cold, moisture and silence favored negative reactions. The small specimen of O. traskiana had shorter periods of negative reactions than the more sluggish specimen, which could be made positive to the light by enforced activity, dryness and heat, resulting in metabolic processes through which chemical responses necessary for a response took place. The modification of the response helped in adaptation. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved)
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Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0095-9928 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2419
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Author Sedgwick, W.T.; Schneider JR., F.
Title The Relation Of Illuminating Gas To Public Health Type Journal Article
Year 1911 Publication Journal of the American Public Health Association Abbreviated Journal J Am Public Health Assoc
Volume 1 Issue (down) 5 Pages 385-390
Keywords Human Health; History
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Language Summary Language Original Title
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ISSN 0273-1975 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2422
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Author Milby, T.T.; Thompson, R.B.
Title Sources of Artificial Light for Turkey Breeding Females Type Journal Article
Year 1945 Publication Poultry Science Abbreviated Journal Poultry Science
Volume 24 Issue (down) 5 Pages 438-441
Keywords Animals
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Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0032-5791 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2428
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Author McMahon, T.A.; Rohr, J.R.; Bernal, X.E.
Title Light and noise pollution interact to disrupt interspecific interactions Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Ecology Abbreviated Journal Ecology
Volume 98 Issue (down) 5 Pages 1290-1299
Keywords Animals
Abstract Studies on the consequences of urbanization often examine the effects of light, noise, and heat pollution independently on isolated species providing a limited understanding of how these combined stressors affect species interactions. Here, we investigate how these factors interact to affect parasitic frog-biting midges (Corethrella spp.) and their tungara frog (Engystomops pustulosus) hosts. A survey of tungara frog calling sites revealed that frog abundance was not significantly correlated with urbanization, light, noise, or temperature. In contrast, frog-biting midges were sensitive to light pollution and noise pollution. Increased light intensity significantly reduced midge abundance at low noise levels. At high noise intensity, there were no midges regardless of light level. Two field experiments controlling light and noise levels to examine attraction of the midges to their host and their feeding behavior confirmed the causality of these field patterns. These findings demonstrate that both light and noise pollution disrupt this host-parasite interaction and highlight the importance of considering interactions among species and types of pollutants to accurately assess the impacts of urbanization on ecological communities.
Address Department of Biological Sciences, Purdue University, 915 West State Street, West Lafayette, Indiana, 47907, USA
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Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0012-9658 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:28170099 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2443
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Author Zhang, Z.; Wang, H.-J.; Wang, D.-R.; Qu, W.-M.; Huang, Z.-L.
Title Red light at intensities above 10 lx alters sleep-wake behavior in mice Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Light, Science & Applications Abbreviated Journal Light Sci Appl
Volume 6 Issue (down) 5 Pages e16231
Keywords Animals
Abstract Sleep is regulated by two mechanisms: the homeostatic process and the circadian clock. Light affects sleep and alertness by entraining the circadian clock, and acutely inducing sleep/alertness, in a manner mediated by intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells. Because intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells are believed to be minimally sensitive to red light, which is widely used for illumination to reduce the photic disturbance to nocturnal animals during the dark phase. However, the appropriate intensity of the red light is unknown. In the present study, we recorded electroencephalograms and electromyograms of freely moving mice to investigate the effects of red light emitted by light-emitting diodes at different intensities and for different durations on the sleep-wake behavior of mice. White light was used as a control. Unexpectedly, red light exerted potent sleep-inducing effects and changed the sleep architecture in terms of the duration and number of sleep episodes, the stage transition, and the EEG power density when the intensity was >20 lx. Subsequently, we lowered the light intensity and demonstrated that red light at or below 10 lx did not affect sleep-wake behavior. White light markedly induced sleep and disrupted sleep architecture even at an intensity as low as 10 lx. Our findings highlight the importance of limiting the intensity of red light (10 lx) to avoid optical influence in nocturnal behavioral experiments, particularly in the field of sleep and circadian research.
Address Institutes of Brain Science and Collaborative Innovation Center for Brain Science, Department of Pharmacology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, State Key Laboratory of Medical Neurobiology and Shanghai Key Laboratory of Clinical Geriatric Medicine, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032, China
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Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2047-7538 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:30167247; PMCID:PMC6062196 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2463
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