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Author Cammaerts, M. C., & Cammaerts, R.
Title Effect of nocturnal lighting on an ant’s ethological and physiological traits Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication MOJ Ecology & Environmental Sciences Abbreviated Journal
Volume 4 Issue (down) 5 Pages 211-218
Keywords Animals
Abstract Artificial nocturnal lighting affects the nature, an impact best studied on vertebrates that are directly depending on the presence or absence of light. Here, we examined on an ant species taken as a model the effects of artificial nocturnal lighting on eleven physiological and ethological traits. Ant workers maintained under nocturnal lighting showed a decrease or a change in their level of activity, food consumption, locomotion, orientation ability, audacity, tactile perception, social relationship, learning and memory. This was largely observed during the night but the effects persisted, at a lower extend, during the day
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Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2735
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Author Doleac, J.L.; Sanders, N.J.
Title Under the Cover of Darkness: How Ambient Light Influences Criminal Activity Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication Review of Economics and Statistics Abbreviated Journal Review of Economics and Statistics
Volume 97 Issue (down) 5 Pages 1093-1103
Keywords Public Safety; Crime
Abstract We exploit daylight saving time (DST) as an exogenous shock to daylight, using both the discontinuous nature of the policy and the 2007 extension of DST, to consider the impact of light on criminal activity.Regression discontinuity estimates show a 7% decrease in robberies following the shift to DST. As expected, effects are largest during the hours directly affected by the shift in daylight. We discuss our findings within the context of criminal decision making and labor supply, and estimate that the2007 DST extension resulted in $59 million in annual social cost savings from avoided robberies.
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ISSN 0034-6535 ISBN Medium
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Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2836
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Author Zheng, H.; Gui, Z.; Wu, H.; Song, A.
Title Developing Non-Negative Spatial Autoregressive Models for Better Exploring Relation Between Nighttime Light Images and Land Use Types Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Remote Sensing Abbreviated Journal Remote Sensing
Volume 12 Issue (down) 5 Pages 798
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract Exploring the relationship between nighttime light and land use is of great significance to understanding human nighttime activities and studying socioeconomic phenomena. Models have been studied to explain the relationships, but the existing studies seldom consider the spatial autocorrelation of night light data, which leads to large regression residuals and an inaccurate regression correlation between night light and land use. In this paper, two non-negative spatial autoregressive models are proposed for the spatial lag model and spatial error model, respectively, which use a spatial adjacency matrix to calculate the spatial autocorrelation effect of light in adjacent pixels on the central pixel. The application scenarios of the two models were analyzed, and the contribution of various land use types to nighttime light in different study areas are further discussed. Experiments in Berlin, Massachusetts and Shenzhen showed that the proposed methods have better correlations with the reference data compared with the non-negative least-squares method, better reflecting the luminous situation of different land use types at night. Furthermore, the proposed model and the obtained relationship between nighttime light and land use types can be utilized for other applications of nighttime light images in the population, GDP and carbon emissions for better exploring the relationship between nighttime remote sensing brightness and socioeconomic activities.
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ISSN 2072-4292 ISBN Medium
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Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2848
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Author Finch, D.; Smith, B.R.; Marshall, C.; Coomber, F.G.; Kubasiewicz, L.M.; Anderson, M.; Wright, P.G.R.; Mathews, F.
Title Effects of Artificial Light at Night (ALAN) on European Hedgehog Activity at Supplementary Feeding Stations Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Animals : an Open Access Journal From MDPI Abbreviated Journal Animals (Basel)
Volume 10 Issue (down) 5 Pages in press
Keywords Animals; Erinaceus europaeus; activity pattern; camera trap; citizen science; fragmentation; hedgehogs; light pollution; lightscape; urbanisation
Abstract : Artificial light at night (ALAN) can have negative consequences for a wide range of taxa. However, the effects on nocturnal mammals other than bats are poorly understood. A citizen science camera trapping experiment was therefore used to assess the effect of ALAN on the activity of European hedgehogs (Erinaceus europaeus) at supplementary feeding stations in UK gardens. A crossover design was implemented at 33 gardens with two treatments-artificial light and darkness-each of which lasted for one week. The order of treatment depended on the existing lighting regime at the feeding station: dark treatments were applied first at dark feeding stations, whereas light treatments were used first where the station was already illuminated. Although temporal changes in activity patterns in response to the treatments were noted in some individuals, the direction of the effects was not consistent. Similarly, there was no overall impact of ALAN on the presence or feeding activities of hedgehogs in gardens where supplementary feeding stations were present. These findings are somewhat reassuring insofar as they demonstrate no net negative effect on a species thought to be in decline, in scenarios where the animals are already habituated to supplementary feeding. However, further research is needed to examine long-term effects and the effects of lighting on hedgehog prey, reproductive success and predation risk.
Address Mammal Society, London E9 6EJ, UK
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Language English Summary Language Original Title
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ISSN 2076-2615 ISBN Medium
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Notes PMID:32354129 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2904
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Author Riedel, C.S.; Georg, B.; Fahrenkrug, J.; Hannibal, J.
Title Altered light induced EGR1 expression in the SCN of PACAP deficient mice Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One
Volume 15 Issue (down) 5 Pages e0232748
Keywords Animals
Abstract The brain's biological clock is located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus and generates circadian rhythms in physiology and behavior. The circadian clock needs daily adjustment by light to stay synchronized (entrained) with the astronomical 24 h light/dark cycle. Light entrainment occurs via melanopsin expressing retinal ganglion cells (mRGCs) and two neurotransmitters of the retinohypothalamic tract (RHT), PACAP and glutamate, which transmit light information to the SCN neurons. In SCN neurons, light signaling involves the immediate-early genes Fos, Egr1 and the clock genes Per1 and Per2. In this study, we used PACAP deficient mice to evaluate PACAP's role in light induced gene expression of EGR1 in SCN neurons during early (ZT17) and late (ZT23) subjective night at high (300 lux) and low (10 lux) white light exposure. We found significantly lower levels of both EGR1 mRNA and protein in the SCN in PACAP deficient mice compared to wild type mice at early subjective night (ZT17) exposed to low but not high light intensity. No difference was found between the two genotypes at late night (ZT23) at neither light intensities. In conclusion, light mediated EGR1 induction in SCN neurons at early night at low light intensities is dependent of PACAP signaling. A role of PACAP in shaping synaptic plasticity during light stimulation at night is discussed.
Address Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Faculty of Health Sciences, Bispebjerg Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen NV, Denmark
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ISSN 1932-6203 ISBN Medium
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Notes PMID:32379800; PMCID:PMC7205239 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2915
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