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Author Zangeneh, P.; Hamledari, H.; McCabe, B. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Quantifying Remoteness for Risk and Resilience Assessment Using Nighttime Satellite Imagery Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Journal of Computing in Civil Engineering Abbreviated Journal J. Comput. Civ. Eng.  
  Volume 34 Issue (down) 5 Pages 04020026  
  Keywords Remote Sensing  
  Abstract Remoteness has a crucial role in risk assessments of megaprojects, resilience assessments of communities and infrastructure, and a wide range of public policymaking. The existing measures of remoteness require an extensive amount of population census and of road and infrastructure network data, and often are limited to narrow scopes. This paper presents a methodology to quantify remoteness using nighttime satellite imagery. The light clusters of nighttime satellite imagery are direct yet unintended consequences of human settled populations and urbanization; therefore, the absence of illuminated clusters is considered as evidence of remoteness. The proposed nighttime remoteness index (NIRI) conceptualizes the remoteness based on the distribution of nighttime lights within radii of up to 1,000 km. A predictive model was created using machine learning techniques such as multivariate adaptive regression splines and support vector machines regressions to establish a reliable and accurate link between nighttime lights and the Accessibility/Remoteness Index of Australia (ARIA). The model was used to establish NIRI for the United States and Canada, and in different years. The index was compared with the Canadian remoteness indexes published by Statistics Canada.  
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  ISSN 0887-3801 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2937  
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Author Khanduri, M., & Saxena, A. url  openurl
  Title Ecological light pollution: Consequences for the aquatic ecosystem Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication International Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Studies Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 8 Issue (down) 5 Pages 1-5  
  Keywords Ecology; Animals  
  Abstract Light Pollution is a growing concern for man and the environment. As awareness of the issue grows, various studies reveal its hitherto unnoticed effects on various organisms and ecological processes. The aquatic ecosystem has not been untouched by its influence either, and although much research is still required in the field, an attempt has been made to compile studies and reviews on the effects of Ecological Light Pollution on the world under water. Light has both direct and indirect influences on aquatic systems, and some possible consequences on various aspects of aquatic ecology have been extrapolated from existing studies. It has been attempted to bring attention to some implications that Ecological Light Pollution may have for the aquatic communities, and the aspects that require further investigation for a better understanding of the consequences of increased artificial illumination for entire aquatic ecosystems.  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2954  
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Author Fabian, M.; Lessmann, C.; Sofke, T. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Natural disasters and regional development – the case of earthquakes Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Environment and Development Economics Abbreviated Journal Envir. Dev. Econ.  
  Volume 24 Issue (down) 5 Pages 479-505  
  Keywords Remote Sensing  
  Abstract We analyze the impact of earthquakes on nighttime lights at a sub-national level, i.e., on grids of different size. We argue that existing studies on the impact of natural disasters on economic development have several important limitations, both at the level of the outcome variable as well as at the level of the independent variable, e.g., the timing of an event and the measuring of its intensity. We aim to overcome these limitations by using geophysical event data on earthquakes together with satellite nighttime lights. Using panel fixed effects regressions covering the entire world for the period 1992–2013, we find that earthquakes reduce both light growth rates and light levels significantly. The effects persist for approximately 5 years, but we find no long-run effects. Effects are stronger the smaller the area of a unit of observation. National institutions and economic conditions are relevant moderating factors.  
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  ISSN 1355-770X ISBN Medium  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3000  
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Author Bijveld, M.M.C.; van Genderen, M.M.; Hoeben, F.P.; Katzin, A.A.; van Nispen, R.M.A.; Riemslag, F.C.C.; Kappers, A.M.L. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Assessment of night vision problems in patients with congenital stationary night blindness Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One  
  Volume 8 Issue (down) 5 Pages e62927  
  Keywords Vision; Adolescent; Adult; Case-Control Studies; Child; *Dark Adaptation; Electroretinography; Eye Diseases, Hereditary/*physiopathology; Female; Genetic Diseases, X-Linked/*physiopathology; Humans; Light; Male; Middle Aged; Myopia/*physiopathology; Night Blindness/*physiopathology; *Night Vision; *Pattern Recognition, Visual; Surveys and Questionnaires; *Visual Acuity; Visual Fields  
  Abstract Congenital Stationary Night Blindness (CSNB) is a retinal disorder caused by a signal transmission defect between photoreceptors and bipolar cells. CSNB can be subdivided in CSNB2 (rod signal transmission reduced) and CSNB1 (rod signal transmission absent). The present study is the first in which night vision problems are assessed in CSNB patients in a systematic way, with the purpose of improving rehabilitation for these patients. We assessed the night vision problems of 13 CSNB2 patients and 9 CSNB1 patients by means of a questionnaire on low luminance situations. We furthermore investigated their dark adapted visual functions by the Goldmann Weekers dark adaptation curve, a dark adapted static visual field, and a two-dimensional version of the “Light Lab”. In the latter test, a digital image of a living room with objects was projected on a screen. While increasing the luminance of the image, we asked the patients to report on detection and recognition of objects. The questionnaire showed that the CSNB2 patients hardly experienced any night vision problems, while all CSNB1 patients experienced some problems although they generally did not describe them as severe. The three scotopic tests showed minimally to moderately decreased dark adapted visual functions in the CSNB2 patients, with differences between patients. In contrast, the dark adapted visual functions of the CSNB1 patients were more severely affected, but showed almost no differences between patients. The results from the “2D Light Lab” showed that all CSNB1 patients were blind at low intensities (equal to starlight), but quickly regained vision at higher intensities (full moonlight). Just above their dark adapted thresholds both CSNB1 and CSNB2 patients had normal visual fields. From the results we conclude that night vision problems in CSNB, in contrast to what the name suggests, are not conspicuous and generally not disabling.  
  Address Bartimeus Institute for the Visually Impaired, Zeist, The Netherlands. mbijveld@bartimeus.nl  
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  ISSN 1932-6203 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes PMID:23658786; PMCID:PMC3643903 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3051  
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Author Lekus H. Y. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Public Space Humanization in a Night City Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Light & Engineering Abbreviated Journal L&E  
  Volume 27 Issue (down) 5 Pages 28-36  
  Keywords Society; Planning  
  Abstract Humanisation of public spaces is an important part of development strategies for a modern city. Design of a luminous environment plays a significant part in this process. We can see a correlation between the existing examples of humanoriented lighting of spaces and the scientific understanding of humanism. This helps us set a goal of space humanisation, select specific tasks that are solved by humanised public spaces, and define factors influencing humanistic quality of the environment at the phase of lighting design.  
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  ISSN 0236-2945 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number UP @ altintas1 @ Serial 3160  
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