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Author Mayoral, O.; Solbes, J.; Cantó, J.; Pina, T.
Title What Has Been Thought and Taught on the Lunar Influence on Plants in Agriculture? Perspective from Physics and Biology Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Agronomy Abbreviated Journal Agronomy
Volume 10 Issue (down) 7 Pages 955
Keywords Moonlight; Plants
Abstract This paper reviews the beliefs which drive some agricultural sectors to consider the lunar influence as either a stress or a beneficial factor when it comes to organizing their tasks. To address the link between lunar phases and agriculture from a scientific perspective, we conducted a review of textbooks and monographs used to teach agronomy, botany, horticulture and plant physiology; we also consider the physics that address the effects of the Moon on our planet. Finally, we review the scientific literature on plant development, specifically searching for any direct or indirect reference to the influence of the Moon on plant physiology. We found that there is no reliable, science-based evidence for any relationship between lunar phases and plant physiology in any plant–science related textbooks or peer-reviewed journal articles justifying agricultural practices conditioned by the Moon. Nor does evidence from the field of physics support a causal relationship between lunar forces and plant responses. Therefore, popular agricultural practices that are tied to lunar phases have no scientific backing. We strongly encourage teachers involved in plant sciences education to objectively address pseudo-scientific ideas and promote critical thinking.
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ISSN 2073-4395 ISBN Medium
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Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3036
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Author Kii, M., Kronprasert, N., & Satayopas, B.
Title ESTIMATION OF TRANSPORT DEMAND USING SATELLITE IMAGE: CASE STUDY OF CHIANG MAI, THAILAND Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication International Journal of GEOMATE Abbreviated Journal
Volume 18 Issue (down) 69 Pages 111-117
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract Transport demand is one of the essential datasets for urban / transport planning and policy development. However, the full size of travel demand survey requires large amount of cost, therefore the survey is merely conducted in developing countries. Their policy decision might be based on the old and limited datasets. In this study we propose a new approach to estimate transport demand using the night-time light satellite image based on the correlation of these two factors. Taking the case of Chiang Mai Metropolitan area, we found a soft relationship between the night-time light intensity and trip generation/trip attraction. Transport survey data is provided by Chiang Mai University for the year 2016. NOAA provides cloud free monthly composite of night-time light satellite image (VIIRS-DNB) by Suomi-NPP satellite of which resolution is 15 arc-second (about 500m by 500m at equator). It is spatially more precise than zones of travel demand survey and monthly frequency. Applying the relationship between transport demand and night-time light intensity, we propose a method to update the transport demand with higher spatial resolution.
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Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2963
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Author Quinn, G.E.; Shin, C.H.; Maguire, M.G.; Stone, R.A.
Title Myopia and ambient lighting at night Type Journal Article
Year 1999 Publication Nature Abbreviated Journal Nature
Volume 399 Issue (down) 6732 Pages 113-114
Keywords Human Health
Abstract Myopia, or short-sightedness, occurs when the image of distant objects, focused by the cornea and lens, falls in front of the retina. It commonly arises from excessive postnatal eye growth, particularly in the vitreous cavity. Its prevalence is increasing and now reaches 70-90% in some Asian populations1,2. As well as requiring optical correction, myopia is a leading risk factor for acquired blindness in adults because it predisposes individuals to retinal detachment, retinal degeneration and glaucoma. It typically develops in the early school years but can manifest into early adulthood2. Its aetiology is poorly understood but may involve genetic and environmental factors1,2, such as viewing close objects, although how this stimulates eye growth is not known3. We have looked at the effects of light exposure on vision, and find a strong association between myopia and night-time ambient light exposure during sleep in children before they reach two years of age.
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Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0028-0836 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:10335839 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2550
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Author Shlesinger, T.; Loya, Y.
Title Breakdown in spawning synchrony: A silent threat to coral persistence Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Science (New York, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal Science
Volume 365 Issue (down) 6457 Pages 1002-1007
Keywords Animals; Coral
Abstract The impacts of human and natural disturbances on coral reefs are typically quantified through visible damage (e.g., reduced coral coverage as a result of bleaching events), but changes in environmental conditions may also cause damage in less visible ways. Despite the current paradigm, which suggests consistent, highly synchronized spawning events, corals that reproduce by broadcast spawning are particularly vulnerable because their reproductive phenology is governed by environmental cues. Here, we quantify coral spawning intensity during four annual reproductive seasons, alongside laboratory analyses at the polyp, colony, and population levels, and we demonstrate that, compared with historical data, several species from the Red Sea have lost their reproductive synchrony. Ultimately, such a synchrony breakdown reduces the probability of successful fertilization, leading to a dearth of new recruits, which may drive aging populations to extinction.
Address School of Zoology, George S. Wise Faculty of Life Sciences, Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Aviv 69978, Israel
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Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0036-8075 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:31488683 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2673
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Author Gaston, K.J.
Title Lighting up the nighttime Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Science (New York, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal Science
Volume 362 Issue (down) 6416 Pages 744-746
Keywords Commentary
Abstract Among the most visually compelling images of the whole Earth have been those created using data obtained at night by astronauts or from satellites. The proliferation in use of electric lighting—including from industrial, commercial, municipal, and domestic sources—is striking. It sketches the spatial distribution of much of the human population, outlining a substantial proportion of the world's coastline, highlighting a multitude of towns and cities, and drawing the major highways that connect them. The data embodied in these nighttime images have been used to estimate and map levels of energy use, urbanization, and economic activity. They have also been key in focusing attention on the environmental impacts of the artificial light at night itself. Explicit steps need to be taken to limit these impacts, which vary according to the intensity, spectrum, spatial extent, and temporal dynamics of this lighting.
Address Environment and Sustainability Institute, University of Exeter, Penryn, Cornwall TR10 9FE, UK. k.j.gaston@exeter.ac.uk
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Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0036-8075 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:30442788 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2058
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