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Author Price, L.L.A.; Udovicic, L.; Behrens, T.; van Drongelen, A.; Garde, A.H.; Hogenelst, K.; Jensen, M.A.; Khazova, M.; Nowak, K.; Rabstein, S.; Romanus, E.; Wolska, A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Linking the non-visual effects of light exposure with occupational health Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication International Journal of Epidemiology Abbreviated Journal Int J Epidemiol  
  Volume 48 Issue (down) 5 Pages 1393–1397  
  Keywords Commentary; Review; Human Health; non-visual effects  
  Abstract In May 2018, the Federal Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (BAuA, Germany) hosted ‘Light and Health at Work’, a workshop concerning occupational health issues relating to non-visual effects of light of both indoor and shift workers. The agenda reflected a common interest in translational research linking laboratory findings with occupational and public health outcomes, and resulted in the founding of the European scientific network NoVEL (standing for Non-Visual Effects of Light). This article sets out the network participants’ shared goals to improve the scientific evidence about light’s non-visual effects, circadian disruption and well-being, using light exposure interventions with high quality assessment of light.

The main work conditions that impair exposure profiles that support healthy circadian regulation are daytime indoor work that reduces light exposures and night-shift work that increases light-at-night (LAN).
 
  Address Central Institute for Labour Protection – National Research Institute (CIOP-PIB), Warszawa, Poland  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0300-5771 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:31257447 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2566  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Kronauer, R.E.; St Hilaire, M.A.; Rahman, S.A.; Czeisler, C.A.; Klerman, E.B. url  doi
openurl 
  Title An Exploration of the Temporal Dynamics of Circadian Resetting Responses to Short- and Long-Duration Light Exposures: Cross-Species Consistencies and Differences Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Journal of Biological Rhythms Abbreviated Journal J Biol Rhythms  
  Volume 34 Issue (down) 5 Pages 497-514  
  Keywords Animals; Human Health  
  Abstract Light is the most effective environmental stimulus for shifting the mammalian circadian pacemaker. Numerous studies have been conducted across multiple species to delineate wavelength, intensity, duration, and timing contributions to the response of the circadian pacemaker to light. Recent studies have revealed a surprising sensitivity of the human circadian pacemaker to short pulses of light. Such responses have challenged photon counting-based theories of the temporal dynamics of the mammalian circadian system to both short- and long-duration light stimuli. Here, we collate published light exposure data from multiple species, including gerbil, hamster, mouse, and human, to investigate these temporal dynamics and explore how the circadian system integrates light information at both short- and long-duration time scales to produce phase shifts. Based on our investigation of these data sets, we propose 3 new interpretations: (1) intensity and duration are independent factors of total phase shift magnitude, (2) the possibility of a linear/log temporal function of light duration that is universal for all intensities for durations less than approximately 12 min, and (3) a potential universal minimum light duration of ~0.7 sec that describes a “dead zone” of light stimulus. We show that these properties appear to be consistent across mammalian species. These interpretations, if confirmed by further experiments, have important practical implications in terms of understanding the underlying physiology and for the design of lighting regimens to reset the mammalian circadian pacemaker.  
  Address Division of Sleep and Circadian Disorders, Departments of Medicine and Neurology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Sage Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0748-7304 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:31368391 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2600  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Bauhr, M. & Carlitz, R. url  openurl
  Title Transparency and the quality of local public service provision Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication The Quality of Government Institute Abbreviated Journal QOG  
  Volume Issue (down) 5 Pages 1-43  
  Keywords Economics; Remote Sensing; public service delivery; Vietnam; Asia  
  Abstract Transparency has been widely promoted as a tool for improving public service

delivery; however, empirical evidence is inconclusive. We suggest that the effects of transparency on service provision are contingent on the nature of the service. Specifically, transparency is more likely to improve the quality of service provision when street-level discretion is high, since discretion increases information asymmetries, and, in the absence of transparency, allows officials to target public services in suboptimal ways. Using finely grained data from the Vietnam Provincial Governance and Public Administration Performance Index between 2011–2017, we show that communes that experience increases in transparency also experience improved quality of education and health (services characterized by greater discretion), while the quality of infrastructure

provision (characterized by less discretion) bears no relation to increased transparency. The findings help us understand when transparency can improve service provision, as well the effects of transparency reforms in non-democratic settings.
 
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2637  
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Author Marchant, P. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Do brighter, whiter street lights improve road safety? Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Significance Abbreviated Journal Significance  
  Volume 16 Issue (down) 5 Pages 8-9  
  Keywords Public Safety; Lighting; Statistics  
  Abstract Would a billion‐dollar investment in improved street lighting make Australian roads safer at night? Paul Marchant finds the evidence wanting  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1740-9705 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2686  
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Author Shith, S. & Ramli, N. A. url  openurl
  Title Night-time ground-level ozone trends and variability over the urban sites Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Journal of Sustainability Science and Management Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 14 Issue (down) 5 Pages 195-201  
  Keywords Atmospheric chemistry; air pollution  
  Abstract This study evaluates the variation of night-time ground-level ozone (O3), nitrogen dioxide (NO2 ) and nitric oxide (NO) from year 2015 to 2016. During this period, the recorded maximum night-time ground-level O3 was 55 ppb at Putrajaya (PT), which have more areas with higher brightness level compared to another urban site, Alor Setar (AS) at 21 ppb. Lower NO concentrations restricted the sinking agents, thus, reducing the depletion rates and resulted in O3 to remain in the atmosphere. The contributor toward night-time ground-level O3 concentration in the urban site was not only NO2 concentration, as light pollution might enhance the O3 formations. The photochemistry rate was commonly accounted to be zero due to the absence of photochemical reactions at night. However, the minimum photochemistry rate in both urban was recorded at the ranged from 1.50-2.70 ppb, indicating that O3 was also titrated at night even though the value is not as high as during the day.  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2734  
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