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Author Yonezawa, T.; Uchida, M.; Tomioka, M.; Matsuki, N. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Lunar Cycle Influences Spontaneous Delivery in Cows Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One  
  Volume 11 Issue (down) 8 Pages e0161735  
  Keywords Moonlight; Animals  
  Abstract There is a popular belief that the lunar cycle influences spontaneous delivery in both humans and cattle. To assess this relationship, we investigated the synodic distribution of spontaneous deliveries in domestic Holstein cows. We used retrospective data from 428 spontaneous, full-term deliveries within a three-year period derived from the calving records of a private farm in Hokkaido, Japan. Spontaneous birth frequency increased uniformly from the new moon to the full moon phase and decreased until the waning crescent phase. There was a statistically significant peak between the waxing gibbous and full moon phases compared with those between the last quarter and the waning crescent. These changes were clearly observed in deliveries among multiparous cows, whereas they were not evident in deliveries among nulliparous cows. These data suggest the utility of dairy cows as models for bio-meteorological studies, and indicate that monitoring lunar phases may facilitate comprehensive understanding of parturition.  
  Address Department of Veterinary Medical Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1932-6203 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27580019; PMCID:PMC5006988 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2082  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Underhill, V.A.; Höbel, G. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Mate choice behavior of female Eastern Gray Treefrogs (Hyla versicolor) is robust to anthropogenic light pollution Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Ethology Abbreviated Journal Ethology  
  Volume 124 Issue (down) 8 Pages 537-548  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract Human activities are drastically changing the amount of artificial light entering natural habitats. Because light pollution alters the sensory environment, it may interfere with behaviors ranging from prey detection and vigilance to mate choice. Here, we test the hypothesis that anthropogenic light pollution affects the mate choice behavior of female Eastern Gray Treefrogs (Hyla versicolor). We tested this hypothesis under two experimental light treatments that simulate the light pollution created by streetlights (expansion of lit areas and increased light intensity), and the light pollution created by headlights of passing vehicles (rapid fluctuations between bright and dark conditions). The hypothesis predicts that females tested under conditions simulating light pollution will show behavioral changes geared toward mitigating detection by predators, such as relaxed preferences, decreased choosiness for the normally preferred call, and differences in approach behavior (either more directional, faster, or stealthier movements, or no approach at all). Contrary to our prediction, we found that light pollution did not affect mate choice behavior in Gray Treefrogs, and should therefore neither interfere with population persistence nor affect the sexual selection regimes on male call traits of this species. However, we caution that this result does not imply that anthropogenic light pollution is of no concern for amphibian conservation, because behavioral responses to variation in nocturnal light levels (both in the natural as well as anthropogenically enhanced range) seem to be highly species‐specific in anurans. We encourage additional studies to help gage the vulnerability of anurans to anthropogenic light pollution.  
  Address  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0179-1613 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number NC @ ehyde3 @ Serial 2090  
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Author Kuffer, M.; Pfeffer, K.; Sliuzas, R.; Taubenbock, H.; Baud, I.; van Maarseveen, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Capturing the Urban Divide in Nighttime Light Images From the International Space Station Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication IEEE Journal of Selected Topics in Applied Earth Observations and Remote Sensing Abbreviated Journal IEEE J. Sel. Top. Appl. Earth Observations Remote Sensing  
  Volume 11 Issue (down) 8 Pages 2578-2586  
  Keywords Remote Sensing  
  Abstract Earlier studies utilizing coarse resolution DMSP-OLS nighttime light (NTL) imagery suggest a negative correlation between the amount of NTL and urban deprivation. The International Space Station (ISS) NTL images offer higher resolution images compared to DMSP-OLS or VIIRS images, allowing an analysis of intraurban NTL variations. The aim of this study is to examine the capacity of ISS images for analyzing the intraurban divide. NTL images of four cities (one African, two Asian, and one South American) have been processed and analyzed. The results show that deprived areas are generally the darker spots of built-up areas within cities, illustrating the urban divide in terms of access to street lighting. However, differences exist between cities: Deprived areas in the African city (Dar es Salaam) generally feature lower NTL emissions compared to the examined cities in South America (Belo Horizonte) and Asia (Mumbai and Ahmedabad). Beyond, variations exist in NTL emissions across deprived areas within cities. Deprived areas at the periphery show less NTL compared to central areas. Edges of deprived areas have higher NTL emissions compared to internal areas. NTL emission differences between types of deprived areas were detected. The correlation between ISS NTL images and population densities is weak; this can be explained by densely built-up deprived areas having less NTL compared to lower density formal areas. Our findings show ISS data complement other data to capture the urban divide between deprived and better-off areas and the need to consider socioeconomic conditions in estimating populations.  
  Address  
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  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1939-1404 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2178  
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Author Youngstedt, S.D.; Elliott, J.A.; Kripke, D.F. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Human Circadian Phase-Response Curves for Exercise Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication The Journal of Physiology Abbreviated Journal J Physiol  
  Volume 597 Issue (down) 8 Pages 2253-2268  
  Keywords Human Health; Circadian Rhythm; Exercise  
  Abstract KEY POINTS: Exercise elicits circadian phase-shifting effects, but additional information is needed. The phase-response curve describing the magnitude and direction of circadian rhythm phase shifts depending on the time of the zeigeber (time cue) stimulus is the most fundamental chronobiological tool for alleviating circadian misalignment and related morbidity. 51 older and 48 young adults followed a circadian rhythms measurement protocol for up to 5.5 days, and performed 1 h of moderate treadmill exercise for 3 consecutive days at one of 8 times of day/night. Temporal changes in the phase of 6-sulphatoxymelatonin (aMT6s) were measured from evening onset, cosine acrophase, morning offset, and duration of excretion, establishing significant PRCs for aMT6 onset and acrophase with large phase delays from 7-10 PM and large phase advances at both 7 AM and 1-4 PM. Along with known synergism with bright light, the above PRCs with a second phase advance region (afternoon) could support both practical and clinical applications. ABSTRACT: Although bright light is regarded as the primary circadian zeitgeber, its limitations support exploring alternative zeitgebers. Exercise elicits significant circadian phase-shifting effects, but fundamental information regarding these effects is needed. The primary aim of this study was to establish phase-response curves (PRC) documenting the size and direction of phase shifts in relation to the circadian time of exercise. Aerobically fit older (n = 51, 59-75 y) and young adults (n = 48, 18-30 y) followed a 90-min laboratory ultra-short sleep wake cycle (60 min wake/30 min sleep) for up to 5 (1/2) days. At the same clock time on three consecutive days, each participant performed 60 min of moderate treadmill exercise (65-75% of heart rate reserve) at one of 8 times of day/night. To describe PRCs, phase shifts were measured for the cosine-fitted acrophase of urinary 6-sulphatoxymelatonin (aMT6s), as well as for the evening rise, morning decline, and change in duration of aMT6s excretion. Significant PRCs were found for aMT6s acrophase, onset and duration, with peak phase advances corresponding to clock times of 7 AM and 1PM-4PM, delays from 7 PM-10 PM, and minimal shifts around 4 PM and 2 AM. There were no significant age or sex differences. The amplitudes of the aMT6s onset and acrophase PRCs are comparable to expectations for bright light of equal duration. The phase advance to afternoon exercise and the exercise-induced PRC for change in aMT6s duration are novel findings. The results support further research exploring additive phase shifting effects of bright light and exercise and health benefits. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.  
  Address Department of Psychiatry, University of California, San Diego, CA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0022-3751 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:30784068 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2230  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Yang, M.; Chen, Q.; Zhu, Y.; Zhou, Q.; Geng, Y.; Lu, C.; Wang, G.; Yang, C.-M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The effects of intermittent light during the evening on sleepiness, sleep electroencephalographic spectral power and performance the next morning Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Lighting Research & Technology Abbreviated Journal Lighting Research & Technology  
  Volume 51 Issue (down) 8 Pages 1159-1177  
  Keywords Human Health; Sleep  
  Abstract Most studies on the effects of light exposure have been conducted with continuous light. The present study investigated the effects of intermittent light exposure on sleepiness, mood, electroencephalographic activity during sleep and performance the next morning. Fifteen volunteers were scheduled to come to the sleep laboratory to experience different lighting conditions: intermittent bright light, continuous bright light and continuous dim light. Subjective sleepiness and mood were assessed during light exposure, with electroencephalographic recording during sleep. After waking the next morning, participants filled out questionnaires and went through two cognitive tasks. The results revealed significantly lower ratings of sleepiness after intermittent light exposure, which is not different from the ratings in the continuous bright light condition, and an increase in vitality during later part of the evening and more beta activity during the first 90 minutes of sleep in the intermittent light condition, in comparison with the continuous dim light condition. However, both intermittent and continuous bright light exposure showed no difference from the continuous dim light condition in subjects' mood and cognitive functioning the next morning. The data indicated intermittent light during evening decreased sleepiness, had only minimal impact on mood in the evening, increased beta electroencephalographic activity during sleep, but had no significant influence on cognitive functioning the next morning.  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1477-1535 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2267  
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