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Author Nickla, D.L. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Ocular diurnal rhythms and eye growth regulation: where we are 50 years after Lauber Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Experimental eye Research Abbreviated Journal Exp Eye Res  
  Volume 114 Issue (up) Pages 25-34  
  Keywords Vision; Human Health; Review  
  Abstract Many ocular processes show diurnal oscillations that optimize retinal function under the different conditions of ambient illumination encountered over the course of the 24 h light/dark cycle. Abolishing the diurnal cues by the use of constant darkness or constant light results in excessive ocular elongation, corneal flattening, and attendant refractive errors. A prevailing hypothesis is that the absence of the Zeitgeber of light and dark alters ocular circadian rhythms in some manner, and results in an inability of the eye to regulate its growth in order to achieve emmetropia, the matching of the front optics to eye length. Another visual manipulation that results in the eye growth system going into a “default” mode of excessive growth is form deprivation, in which a translucent diffuser deprives the eye of visual transients (spatial or temporal) while not significantly reducing light levels; these eyes rapidly elongate and become myopic. It has been hypothesized that form deprivation might constitute a type of “constant condition” whereby the absence of visual transients drives the eye into a similar default mode as that in response to constant light or dark. Interest in the potential influence of light cycles and ambient lighting in human myopia development has been spurred by a recent study showing a positive association between the amount of time that children spent outdoors and a reduced prevalence of myopia. The growing eyes of chickens and monkeys show a diurnal rhythm in axial length: Eyes elongate more during the day than during the night. There is also a rhythm in choroidal thickness that is in approximate anti-phase to the rhythm in eye length. The phases are altered in eyes growing too fast, in response to form deprivation or negative lenses, or too slowly, in response to myopic defocus, suggesting an influence of phase on the emmetropization system. Other potential rhythmic influences include dopamine and melatonin, which form a reciprocal feedback loop, and signal “day” and “night” respectively. Retinal dopamine is reduced during the day in form deprived myopic eyes, and dopamine D2 agonists inhibit ocular growth in animal models. Rhythms in intraocular pressure as well, may influence eye growth, perhaps as a mechanical stimulus triggering changes in scleral extracellular matrix synthesis. Finally, evidence shows varying influences of environmental lighting parameters on the emmetropization system, such as high intensity light being protective against myopia in chickens. This review will cover the evidence for the possible influence of these various factors on ocular growth. The recognition that ocular rhythms may play a role in emmetropization is a first step toward understanding how they may be manipulated in treatment therapies to prevent myopia in humans.  
  Address New England College of Optometry, Department of Biosciences, 424 Beacon Street, Boston, MA 02115, USA. nicklad@neco.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0014-4835 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:23298452; PMCID:PMC3742730 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1987  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Wilson IV, J.; Reid, K.J.; Braun, R.I.; Abbott, S.M.; Zee, P.C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Habitual Light Exposure Relative to Circadian Timing in Delayed Sleep-Wake Phase Disorder Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Sleep Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume in press Issue (up) Pages  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract Study Objectives

To compare melatonin timing, a well validated marker for endogenous circadian phase, and habitual light exposure patterns in adults with delayed sleep-wake phase disorder (DSWPD) and intermediate chronotype controls.

Methods

12 individuals with DSWPD (5 females, mean age 31.1) and 12 age matched controls (6 females, mean age 33.6) underwent a minimum of seven days of light and activity monitoring followed by an inpatient hospital stay, where blood was taken to assess melatonin timing (calculated as dim light melatonin onset – DLMO). Habitual light exposure patterns were then compared to a human phase response curve (PRC) to light.

Results

Relative to clock time, individuals with DSWPD had a later light exposure pattern compared to controls, but their light exposure pattern was earlier relative to DLMO. According to the human phase response curve (PRC) to light, individuals with DSWPD had less daily advancing light exposure compared to controls. The primary difference was seen in the late portion of the advancing window, in which individuals with DSWPD were exposed to fewer pulses of light of equivalent duration and intensity compared to controls.

Conclusions

Diminished advancing light exposure may play a role in the development and perpetuation of delayed sleep-wake timing in individuals with DSWPD. Enhancing light exposure during the later portion of the advancing window represents an innovative and complementary strategy that has the potential to improve the effectiveness of bright light therapy in DSWPD.
 
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0161-8105 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1990  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Wren, W.; Locke, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Upgraded Rig Lighting Improves Night Time Visibility While Reducing Stray Light and the Threat to Dark Skies in West Texas Type Conference Article
  Year 2015 Publication Society of Petroleum Engineers Abbreviated Journal Soc. Petrol. Engr.  
  Volume Issue (up) Pages  
  Keywords Lighting; outdoor lighting; petroleum; oil and gas; lighting engineering  
  Abstract McDonald Observatory, part of the University of Texas at Austin, is a world-class astronomical-research facility representing hundreds of millions of dollars of public and private investment that is increasingly threatened by nighttime lighting from oil-and-gas-related activities in and around the Permian Basin. Established in the remote Davis Mountains of West Texas in 1932, the observatory is home to some of the world's largest telescopes and it has continued as a world-renowned research center. Dark night skies are crucial to its mission. Since 2010, however, the sky along the observatory's northern horizon, in the direction of the Permian Basin, has been steadily and rapidly brightening, due to new exploration for oil and gas. The pace has been accelerating: More than 2,000 applications were filed over the past year to drill in the region. In 2011, the State of Texas enacted a law that instructs the seven counties surrounding McDonald Observatory, an area covering some 28,000 square miles, to adopt outdoor lighting ordinances designed to preserve the dark night skies for ongoing astronomical research at the observatory. Most had already done so voluntarily, but additional effort is needed throughout the area to address fast-moving energy-exploration activities.

A joint project between McDonald Observatory and Pioneer Energy Services (PES) has demonstrated that many of the adverse effects of oilfield lighting can be mitigated, without jeopardizing safety, through proper shielding and aiming of light fixtures. Beginning July, 2013, PES granted the observatory access to a working rig, Pioneer Rig #29. Every time the rig moved to a new location, there was an opportunity to install shields, re-aim floodlights, and evaluate effectiveness.

This joint project demonstrated that, in many cases, nighttime visibility on the rig can be significantly improved. Many light fixtures, which had been sources of blinding glare due to of lack of shielding, poor placement, or poor aiming, were made better and safer, using optional glare shields that are offered by manufacturers for a variety of fixture models. Proper shielding and aiming of existing fixtures improves visibility and reduces wasted uplight. New lighting systems that take advantage of light-emitting-diode technology also promise better directionality, reduced fuel consumption, and darker skies overhead.

The oil-and-gas industry has been lighting its exploration and production activities in much same way for more than 100 years, with little to no consideration of environmental impacts. The opportunity exists to adopt new lighting practices and technologies that improve safety, reduce costs, and help preserve our vanishing night skies so that important ongoing scientific exploration can continue.
 
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Society of Petroleum Engineers Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes SPE E&P Health, Safety, Security and Environmental Conference-Americas held in Denver, Colorado, USA, 16–18 March 2015 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1993  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Zhao, N.; Cao, G.; Zhang, W.; Samson, E.L. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Tweets or nighttime lights: Comparison for preeminence in estimating socioeconomic factors Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication ISPRS Journal of Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing Abbreviated Journal ISPRS Journal of Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing  
  Volume 146 Issue (up) Pages 1-10  
  Keywords Remote Sensing  
  Abstract Nighttime lights (NTL) imagery is one of the most commonly used tools to quantitatively study socioeconomic systems over large areas. In this study we aim to use location-based social media big data to challenge the primacy of NTL imagery on estimating socioeconomic factors. Geo-tagged tweets posted in the contiguous United States in 2013 were retrieved to produce a tweet image with the same spatial resolution of the NTL imagery (i.e., 0.00833° × 0.00833°). Sum tweet (the total number of tweets) and sum light (summed DN value of the NTL image) of each state or county were obtained from the tweets and the NTL images, respectively, to estimate three important socioeconomic factors: personal income, electric power consumption, and fossil fuel carbon dioxide emissions. Results show that sum tweet is a better measure of personal income and electric power consumption while carbon dioxide emissions can be more accurately estimated by sum light. We further exploited that African-Americans adults are more likely than White seniors to post geotagged tweets in the US, yet did not find any significant correlations between proportions of the subpopulations and the estimation accuracy of the socioeconomic factors. Existence of saturated pixels and blooming effects and failure to remove gas flaring reduce quality of NTL imagery in estimating socioeconomic factors, however, such problems are nonexistent in the tweet images. This study reveals that the number of geo-tagged tweets has great potential to be deemed as a substitute of brightness of NTL to assess socioeconomic factors over large geographic areas.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0924-2716 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1994  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Xu, Y.; Knudby, A.; Côté-Lussier, C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Mapping ambient light at night using field observations and high-resolution remote sensing imagery for studies of urban environments Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Building and Environment Abbreviated Journal Building and Environment  
  Volume 145 Issue (up) Pages 104-114  
  Keywords Remote Sensing  
  Abstract Artificial lighting allows for a variety of activities to take place in the absence of sunlight, but also has an increasingly recognized range of negative social and health-related effects. For studies of urban ambient light at night (ALN), objective and standardized data on the amount of ALN experienced by people is often unavailable at the necessary intra-urban spatial scale. In this paper, we outline options for producing such data through (1) field observations acquired with a luminance meter mounted on a vehicle, (2) a 1-m resolution image mosaic produced from a dedicated aerial survey, and (3) a 50-m resolution image taken from the International Space Station. We produce two remote sensing-derived maps of ALN for a large urban area in Canada, and compare their spatial detail to the World Atlas of Artificial Night Sky Brightness, a publicly available alternative data source. Convergent validity with field observations suggests that both mapping approaches can be used to quantify the amount of light humans are exposed to at night, at different locations across a large urban area, and may thus aid in further studying the varied effects of artificial nighttime lighting.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0360-1323 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1998  
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