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Author Welbers, A.A.M.H.; van Dis, N.E.; Kolvoort, A.M.; Ouyang, J.; Visser, M.E.; Spoelstra, K.; Dominoni, D.M.
Title Artificial Light at Night Reduces Daily Energy Expenditure in Breeding Great Tits (Parus major) Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution Abbreviated Journal Front. Ecol. Evol.
Volume 5 Issue (up) Pages
Keywords Animals
Abstract The ecological impact of artificial light at night (ALAN) is an increasingly recognized process that accompanies expanding urbanization. Yet, we have limited knowledge on the impact of ALAN on wild species, and on the potential to mitigate any negative effects by using different light sources and colors. In birds, effects of ALAN on activity levels are reported for several species and, hence, their daily energy expenditure (DEE) may be affected. DEE is a potent mediator of life-history trade-offs and fitness and thus an important aspect to consider when examining the potential long-term ecological effects of ALAN. Previous work has suggested that birds exposed to ALAN show higher levels of provisioning and nocturnal activity, suggesting that white ALAN increases DEE. Other factors regulating DEE, such as provisioning behavior and food availability, might also respond to ALAN and thus indirectly affect DEE. We tested the hypothesis that ALAN increases DEE using an experimental setup where four previously unlit transects were illuminated with either white, green, or red LED light, or left dark as a control treatment. This setup was replicated in eight locations across the Netherlands. We measured DEE of our focal species, the great tit (Parus major), using a novel doubly labeled water technique that uses breath rather than blood samples. Contrary to our expectations, birds feeding their offspring under white and green ALAN showed lower DEE compared to birds in the control dark treatment. Differences in chick provisioning activity did not explain this result, as neither visit rates nor daily activity timing was affected by light treatment. However, food availability under white and green light was much higher compared to red light and the dark control. This difference strongly suggests that the lower DEE under white and green ALAN sites is a consequence of higher food availability in these treatments. This result shows that there can be positive, indirect effects of ALAN for breeding song birds which may balance against the negative direct effects shown in previous studies.
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Language Summary Language Original Title
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Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2296-701X ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2460
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Author Hatori, M.; Gronfier, C.; Van Gelder, R.N.; Bernstein, P.S.; Carreras, J.; Panda, S.; Marks, F.; Sliney, D.; Hunt, C.E.; Hirota, T.; Furukawa, T.; Tsubota, K.
Title Global rise of potential health hazards caused by blue light-induced circadian disruption in modern aging societies Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication NPJ Aging and Mechanisms of Disease Abbreviated Journal NPJ Aging Mech Dis
Volume 3 Issue (up) Pages 9
Keywords Commentary; Human Health
Abstract Mammals receive light information through the eyes, which perform two major functions: image forming vision to see objects and non-image forming adaptation of physiology and behavior to light. Cone and rod photoreceptors form images and send the information via retinal ganglion cells to the brain for image reconstruction. In contrast, nonimage-forming photoresponses vary widely from adjustment of pupil diameter to adaptation of the circadian clock. nonimage-forming responses are mediated by retinal ganglion cells expressing the photopigment melanopsin. Melanopsin-expressing cells constitute 1-2% of retinal ganglion cells in the adult mammalian retina, are intrinsically photosensitive, and integrate photic information from rods and cones to control nonimage-forming adaptation. Action spectra of ipRGCs and of melanopsin photopigment peak around 480 nm blue light. Understanding melanopsin function lets us recognize considerable physiological effects of blue light, which is increasingly important in our modern society that uses light-emitting diode. Misalignment of circadian rhythmicity is observed in numerous conditions, including aging, and is thought to be involved in the development of age-related disorders, such as depression, diabetes, hypertension, obesity, and cancer. The appropriate regulation of circadian rhythmicity by proper lighting is therefore essential. This perspective introduces the potential risks of excessive blue light for human health through circadian rhythm disruption and sleep deprivation. Knowing the positive and negative aspects, this study claims the importance of being exposed to light at optimal times and intensities during the day, based on the concept of the circadian clock, ultimately to improve quality of life to have a healthy and longer life.
Address Department of Ophthalmology, Keio University School of Medicine, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo Japan.0000 0004 1936 9959grid.26091.3c
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Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2056-3973 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:28649427; PMCID:PMC5473809 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2462
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Author Lammerts, W.E.
Title The effect of continuous light, high nutrient level and temperature on flowering of camellia hybrids Type Journal Article
Year 1949 Publication American Camellia Yearbook Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue (up) Pages 53-56
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Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2466
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Author Jasiński, T.
Title Modeling electricity consumption using nighttime light images and artificial neural networks Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Energy Abbreviated Journal Energy
Volume 179 Issue (up) Pages 831-842
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract The purpose of this paper is to model electricity consumption using Artificial Neural Networks (ANN). Total electricity consumption and consumption generated by households (HH) were modeled. The input variables of the ANN were based on nighttime light images from VIIRS DNB. Studies conducted thus far have covered mainly linear models. Most of case studies focused on single countries or groups of countries with only few focusing on the sub-national scale. This paper is pioneering in covering an area of Poland (Central Europe) at NUTS-2 level. The use of ANN enabled the modeling of the non-linear relations associated with the complex structure of electricity demand. Satellite data were collected for the period 2013–2016, and included images with improved quality (inter alia higher resolution), compared to the DMSP/OLS program. As images are available from April 2012 onwards, it is only recently that their number has become sufficient for ANN learning. The images were used to create models of multilayer perceptrons. The results achieved by ANN were compared with the results obtained using linear regressions. Studies have confirmed that electricity consumption can be determined with higher precision by the ANN method.
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Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0360-5442 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2475
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Author Keola, S.; Andersson, M.; Hall, O.
Title Monitoring Economic Development from Space: Using Nighttime Light and Land Cover Data to Measure Economic Growth Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication World Development Abbreviated Journal World Development
Volume 66 Issue (up) Pages 322-334
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract This study demonstrates estimations of economic activities on global, national, and subnational levels using remote sensing data, with a focus on developing economies. It extends a recent statistical framework which uses nighttime lights to estimate official income growth by accounting for agriculture and forestry which emit less or no additional observable nighttime light. The study argues that nighttime lights alone may not explain value-added by agriculture and forestry. By adding land cover data, our framework can be used to estimate economic growth in administrative areas of virtually any size.
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Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0305750X ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2476
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