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Author Dominoni, D.M.; Smit, J.A.H.; Visser, M.E.; Halfwerk, W.
Title Multisensory pollution: Artificial light at night and anthropogenic noise have interactive effects on activity patterns of great tits (Parus major) Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Environmental Pollution Abbreviated Journal Environmental Pollution
Volume 256 Issue Pages 113314
Keywords (up) Animals
Abstract Urbanisation is increasing globally at a rapid pace. Consequently, wild species face novel environmental stressors associated with urban sprawl, such as artificial light at night and noise. These stressors have pervasive effects on the behaviour and physiology of many species. Most studies have singled out the impact of just one of these stressors, while in the real world they are likely to co-occur both temporally and spatially, and we thus lack a clear understanding of the combined effect of anthropogenic stressors on wild species. Here, we experimentally exposed captive male great tits (Parus major) to artificial light at night and 24 h noise in a fully factorial experiment. We then measured the effect of both these stressors on their own and their combination on the amount and timing of activity patterns. We found that both light and noise affected activity patterns when presented alone, but in opposite ways: light increased activity, particularly at night, while noise reduced it, particularly during the day. When the two stressors were combined, we found a synergistic effect on the total activity and the nighttime activity, but an antagonistic effect on daytime activity. The significant interaction between noise and light treatment also differed among forest and city birds. Indeed, we detected a significant interactive effect on light and noise on daytime, nighttime, dusktime and offset of activity of urban birds, but not of forest birds. These results suggest that both artificial light at night and anthropogenic noise can drive changes in activity patterns, but that the specific impacts depend on the habitat of origin. Furthermore, our results demonstrate that co-occurring exposure to noise and light can lead to a stronger impact at night than predicted from the additive effects and thus that multisensory pollution may be a considerable threat for wildlife.
Address Department of Animal Ecology, Netherlands Institute of Ecology (NIOO-KNAW), Wageningen, the Netherlands; avide.dominoni(at)glasgow.ac.uk
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Elsevier Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0269-7491 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2744
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Author Liu, Z.; Qian, M.; Tang, X.; Hu, W.; Sun, S.; Li, G.; Zhang, S.; Meng, F.; Cao, X.; Sun, J.; Xu, C.; Tan, B.; Pang, Q.; Zhao, B.; Wang, Z.; Guan, Y.; Ruan, X.; Liu, B.
Title SIRT7 couples light-driven body temperature cues to hepatic circadian phase coherence and gluconeogenesis Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Nature Metabolism Abbreviated Journal Nat Metab
Volume 1 Issue 11 Pages 1141-1156
Keywords (up) Animals
Abstract The central pacemaker in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) synchronizes peripheral oscillators to coordinate physiological and behavioural activities throughout the body. How circadian phase coherence between the SCN and the periphery is controlled is not well understood. Here, we identify hepatic SIRT7 as an early responsive element to light that ensures circadian phase coherence in the mouse liver. The SCN-driven body temperature (BT) oscillation induces rhythmic expression of HSP70, which promotes SIRT7 ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation. Acute temperature challenge dampens the BT oscillation and causes an advanced liver circadian phase. Further, hepatic SIRT7 deacetylates CRY1, promotes its FBXL3-mediated degradation and regulates the hepatic clock and glucose homeostasis. Loss of Sirt7 in mice leads to an advanced liver circadian phase and rapid entrainment of the hepatic clock upon daytime-restricted feeding. These data identify a BT–HSP70–SIRT7–CRY1 axis that couples the mouse hepatic clock to the central pacemaker and ensures circadian phase coherence and glucose homeostasis.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2522-5812 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2747
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Author Lao, S.; Robertson, B.A.; Anderson, A.W.; Blair, R.B.; Eckles, J.W.; Turner, R.J.; Loss, S.R.
Title The influence of artificial night at night and polarized light on bird-building collisions Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Biological Conservation Abbreviated Journal Biological Conservation
Volume 241 Issue Pages 108358
Keywords (up) Animals
Abstract Collisions with buildings annually kill up to 1 billion birds in the United States. Bird-building collisions primarily occur at glass surfaces: birds often fail to perceive glass as a barrier and appear to be attracted to artificial light emitted from windows. However, some aspects of avian vision are poorly understood, including how bird responses to different types of light influence building collisions. Some evidence suggests birds can detect polarized light, which may serve as a cue to assist with migration orientation and/or detect water bodies. Dark, reflective surfaces, including glass, reflect high degrees of polarized light, causing polarized light pollution (PLP). However, no studies have analyzed the relationship between bird collisions and PLP reflected from buildings. Additionally, while artificial light at night (ALAN) is frequently implicated as a major factor influencing bird-building collisions, few studies have analyzed this relationship. We investigated both types of light pollution—PLP and ALAN—and their association with bird collisions at 48 façades of 13 buildings in Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA. We found that the area of glass emitting ALAN was the most important factor influencing collisions, and that this effect of ALAN was independent of overall glass area; this result provides strong support for turning off lights at night to reduce bird-building collisions. Although we found no relationship between PLP and collisions, additional research is needed to better understand bird responses to polarized light. Fully understanding how different aspects of light influence bird-building collisions can inform conservation efforts to reduce this major threat to birds.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0006-3207 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2757
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Author Mishra, I.; Knerr, R.M.; Stewart, A.A.; Payette, W.I.; Richter, M.M.; Ashley, N.T.
Title Light at night disrupts diel patterns of cytokine gene expression and endocrine profiles in zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata) Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Scientific Reports Abbreviated Journal Sci Rep
Volume 9 Issue 1 Pages 15833
Keywords (up) Animals
Abstract Increased exposure to light pollution perturbs physiological processes through misalignment of daily rhythms at the cellular and tissue levels. Effects of artificial light-at-night (ALAN) on diel properties of immunity are currently unknown. We therefore tested the effects of ALAN on diel patterns of cytokine gene expression, as well as key hormones involved with the regulation of immunity, in zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata). Circulating melatonin and corticosterone, and mRNA expression levels of pro- (IL-1beta, IL-6) and anti-inflammatory (IL-10) cytokines were measured at six time points across 24-h day in brain (nidopallium, hippocampus, and hypothalamus) and peripheral tissues (liver, spleen, and fat) of zebra finches exposed to 12 h light:12 h darkness (LD), dim light-at-night (DLAN) or constant bright light (LLbright). Melatonin and corticosterone concentrations were significantly rhythmic under LD, but not under LLbright and DLAN. Genes coding for cytokines showed tissue-specific diurnal rhythms under LD and were lost with exposure to LLbright, except IL-6 in hypothalamus and liver. In comparison to LLbright, effects of DLAN were less adverse with persistence of some diurnal rhythms, albeit with significant waveform alterations. These results underscore the circadian regulation of biosynthesis of immune effectors and imply the susceptibility of daily immune and endocrine patterns to ALAN.
Address Department of Biology, Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green, KY, USA. noah.ashley@wku.edu
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2045-2322 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:31676761; PMCID:PMC6825233 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2766
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Author Syposz, M.; Gonçalves, F.; Carty, M.; Hoppitt, W.; Manco, F.
Title Factors influencing Manx Shearwater grounding on the west coast of Scotland Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Ibis Abbreviated Journal Ibis
Volume 160 Issue 4 Pages 846-854
Keywords (up) Animals
Abstract Grounding of thousands of newly fledged petrels and shearwaters (family Procellariidae) in built‐up areas due to artificial light is a global problem. Due to their anatomy these grounded birds find it difficult to take off from built‐up areas and many fall victim to predation, cars, dehydration or starvation. This research investigated a combination of several factors that may influence the number of Manx Shearwater Puffinus puffinus groundings in a coastal village of Scotland located close to a nesting site for this species. A model was developed that used meteorological variables and moon cycle to predict the daily quantity of birds that were recovered on the ground. The model, explaining 46.32% of the variance of the data, revealed how new moon and strong onshore winds influence grounding. To a lesser extent, visibility conditions can also have an effect on grounding probabilities. The analysis presented in this study can improve rescue campaigns of not only Manx Shearwaters but also other species attracted to the light pollution by predicting conditions leading to an increase in the number of groundings. It could also inform local authorities when artificial light intensity needs to be reduced.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0019-1019 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2778
Permanent link to this record