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Author Thompson, E.K.; Cullinan, N.L.; Jones, T.M.; Hopkins, G.R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of artificial light at night and male calling on movement patterns and mate location in field crickets Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Animal Behaviour Abbreviated Journal Animal Behaviour  
  Volume 158 Issue Pages 183-191  
  Keywords (up) Animals  
  Abstract Anthropogenic factors, such as artificial light at night (ALAN), are increasingly linked to significant modifications in animal behaviours, such as foraging or migration. However, few studies have investigated directly whether the presence of ALAN affects the ability to find a mate (mate location). One direct effect of the presence of ALAN is that it can create a light barrier in an otherwise dark environment. This may have significant behavioural implications for nocturnally active species if it affects their ability to respond to potential mates. Our study, using the acoustically orienting Australian black field cricket, Teleogryllus commodus, determined experimentally whether the presence of a fragmented light environment influenced movement patterns of virgin females and males. Moreover, given the importance of male song for reproductive outcomes in this species, we assessed simultaneously whether such behaviours were modified by the presence of a male attraction call. We found that while initiation of movement was slower in the presence of ALAN, the behavioural shifts associated with its presence were relatively small compared to the influence of a broadcast male attraction call. The response to the male attraction call was typically stronger for females than for males, but both males and females modified aspects of behaviour when it was present regardless of whether their immediate environment was fragmented by artificial light at night or not. Artificial light at night may alter subtle aspects of movement and mating behaviour in this species, but ultimately does not provide a barrier to movement or mate location.  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0003-3472 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2752  
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Author Dananay, K.L.; Benard, M.F. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Artificial light at night decreases metamorphic duration and juvenile growth in a widespread amphibian Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences Abbreviated Journal Proc. R. Soc. B  
  Volume 285 Issue 1882 Pages 20180367  
  Keywords (up) Animals  
  Abstract Artificial light at night (ALAN) affects over 20% of the earth's surface and is estimated to increase 6% per year. Most studies of ALAN have focused on a single mechanism or life stage. We tested for indirect and direct ALAN effects that occurred by altering American toads' (Anaxyrus americanus) ecological interactions or by altering toad development and growth, respectively. We conducted an experiment over two life stages using outdoor mesocosms and indoor terraria. In the first phase, the presence of ALAN reduced metamorphic duration and periphyton biomass. The effects of ALAN appeared to be mediated through direct effects on toad development, and we found no evidence for indirect effects of ALAN acting through altered ecological interactions or colonization. In the second phase, post-metamorphic toad growth was reduced by 15% in the ALAN treatment. Juvenile-stage ALAN also affected toad activity: in natural light, toads retreated into leaf litter at night whereas ALAN toads did not change behaviour. Carry-over effects of ALAN were also present; juvenile toads that had been exposed to larval ALAN exhibited marginally increased activity. In this time frame and system, our experiments suggested ALAN's effects act primarily through direct effects, rather than indirect effects, and can persist across life stages.  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0962-8452 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1951  
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Author de Jong, M.; Lamers, K.P.; Eugster, M.; Ouyang, J.Q.; Da Silva, A.; Mateman, A.C.; van Grunsven, R.H.A.; Visser, M.E.; Spoelstra, K. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of experimental light at night on extra-pair paternity in a songbird Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Journal of Experimental Zoology. Part A, Ecological and Integrative Physiology Abbreviated Journal J Exp Zool A Ecol Integr Physiol  
  Volume 329 Issue 8-9 Pages 441-448  
  Keywords (up) animals  
  Abstract Light pollution is increasing worldwide and significantly affects animal behavior. In birds, these effects include advancement of morning activity and onset of dawn song, which may affect extra-pair paternity. Advanced dawn song of males may stimulate females to engage in extra-pair copulations, and the earlier activity onset may affect the males' mate guarding behavior. Earlier work showed an effect of light at night on extra-pair behavior, but this was in an area with other anthropogenic disturbances. Here, we present a two-year experimental study on effects of light at night on extra-pair paternity of great tits (Parus major). Previously dark natural areas were illuminated with white, red, and green LED lamps and compared to a dark control. In 2014, the proportion of extra-pair young in broods increased with distance to the red and white lamps (i.e., at lower light intensities), but decreased with distance to the poles in the dark control. In 2013, we found no effects on the proportion of extra-pair young. The total number of offspring sired by a male was unaffected by artificial light at night in both years, suggesting that potential changes in female fidelity in pairs breeding close to white and red light did not translate into fitness benefits for the males of these pairs. Artificial light at night might disrupt the natural patterns of extra-pair paternity, possibly negates potential benefits of extra-pair copulations and thus could alter sexual selection processes in wild birds.  
  Address Department of Animal Ecology, Netherlands Institute of Ecology (NIOO-KNAW), Wageningen, The Netherlands  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2471-5638 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:29952126 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1953  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Emmer, K.M.; Russart, K.L.G.; Walker, W.H.; Nelson, R.J.; DeVries, A.C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of light at night on laboratory animals and research outcomes Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Behavioral Neuroscience Abbreviated Journal Behav Neurosci  
  Volume 132 Issue 4 Pages 302-314  
  Keywords (up) Animals  
  Abstract Light has substantial influences on the physiology and behavior of most laboratory animals. As such, lighting conditions within animal rooms are potentially significant and often underappreciated variables within experiments. Disruption of the light/dark cycle, primarily by exposing animals to light at night (LAN), disturbs biological rhythms and has widespread physiological consequences because of mechanisms such as melatonin suppression, sympathetic stimulation, and altered circadian clock gene expression. Thus, attention to the lighting environment of laboratory animals and maintaining consistency of a light/dark cycle is imperative for study reproducibility. Light intensity, as well as wavelength, photoperiod, and timing, are all important variables. Although modern rodent facilities are designed to facilitate appropriate light cycling, there are simple ways to modify rooms to prevent extraneous light exposure during the dark period. Attention to lighting conditions of laboratory animals by both researchers and research care staff ensures best practices for maintaining animal welfare, as well as reproducibility of research results. (PsycINFO Database Record  
  Address Rockefeller Neuroscience Institute, West Virginia University  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0735-7044 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:29952608 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1957  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Maroni, M.J.; Capri, K.M.; Cushman, A.V.; Monteiro De Pina, I.K.; Chasse, M.H.; Seggio, J.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Constant light alters serum hormone levels related to thyroid function in male CD-1 mice Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Chronobiology International Abbreviated Journal Chronobiol Int  
  Volume 35 Issue 10 Pages 1456-1463  
  Keywords (up) Animals  
  Abstract Disruptions to the circadian rhythm can lead to altered metabolism. Modification of thyroid function may be a reason why circadian misalignment may contribute to future metabolic disorders. We investigated whether circadian disruption through constant light (LL) can lead to variations in hormone levels associated with thyroid function. Mice were exposed to LL or a 12:12 Light:Dark (LD) cycle for 6 weeks; then glucose tolerance and thyroid hormone levels were measured at ZT 6 and ZT 18. There was day/night variation in glucose tolerance, but LL had no effect. LL reduced TSH, increased fT4, and abolished day/night variation in fT3 and leptin. These findings illustrate that LL alters thyroid-related hormones, providing evidence of a link between circadian disruption and thyroid function.  
  Address a Department of Biological Sciences , Bridgewater State University , Bridgewater , MA , USA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0742-0528 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:29953263 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1958  
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