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Author Gaynor, K.M.; Hojnowski, C.E.; Carter, N.H.; Brashares, J.S.
Title The influence of human disturbance on wildlife nocturnality Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Science (New York, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal Science
Volume 360 Issue 6394 Pages 1232-1235
Keywords (up)
Abstract Rapid expansion of human activity has driven well-documented shifts in the spatial distribution of wildlife, but the cumulative effect of human disturbance on the temporal dynamics of animals has not been quantified. We examined anthropogenic effects on mammal diel activity patterns, conducting a meta-analysis of 76 studies of 62 species from six continents. Our global study revealed a strong effect of humans on daily patterns of wildlife activity. Animals increased their nocturnality by an average factor of 1.36 in response to human disturbance. This finding was consistent across continents, habitats, taxa, and human activities. As the global human footprint expands, temporal avoidance of humans may facilitate human-wildlife coexistence. However, such responses can result in marked shifts away from natural patterns of activity, with consequences for fitness, population persistence, community interactions, and evolution.
Address Department of Environmental Science, Policy, and Management, University of California-Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher AAAS Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0036-8075 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:29903973 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1988
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Author Lammerts, W.E.
Title The effect of continuous light, high nutrient level and temperature on flowering of camellia hybrids Type Journal Article
Year 1949 Publication American Camellia Yearbook Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages 53-56
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Address
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Publisher Place of Publication Editor
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Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2466
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Author Zheng, Q.; Weng, Q.; Wang, K.
Title Correcting the Pixel Blooming Effect (PiBE) of DMSP-OLS nighttime light imagery Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Remote Sensing of Environment Abbreviated Journal Remote Sensing of Environment
Volume 240 Issue Pages 111707
Keywords (up) *instrumentation; Remote Sensing
Abstract In the last two decades, the advance in nighttime light (NTL) remote sensing has fueled a surge in extensive research towards mapping human footprints. Nevertheless, the full potential of NTL data is largely constrained by the blooming effect. In this study, we propose a new concept, the Pixel Blooming Effect (PiBE), to delineate the mutual influence of lights from a pixel and its neighbors, and an integrated framework to eliminate the PiBE in radiance calibrated DMSP-OLS datasets (DMSPgrc). First, lights from isolated gas flaring sources and a Gaussian model were used to model how the PiBE functions on each pixel through point spread function (PSF). Second, a two-stage deblurring approach (TSDA) was developed to deconvolve DMSPgrc images with Tikhonov regularization to correct the PiBE and reconstruct PiBE-free images. Third, the proposed framework was assessed by synthetic data and VIIRS imagery and by testing the resulting image with two applications. We found that high impervious surface fraction pixels (ISF > 0.6) were impacted by the highest absolute magnitude of PiBE, whereas NTL pattern of low ISF pixels (ISF < 0.2) was more sensitive to the PiBE. By using TSDA the PiBE in DMSPgrc images was effectively corrected which enhanced data variation and suppressed pseudo lights from non-built-up pixels in urban areas. The reconstructed image had the highest similarity to reference data from synthetic image (SSIM = 0.759) and VIIRS image (r = 0.79). TSDA showed an acceptable performance for linear objects (width > 1.5 km) and circular objects (radius > 0.5 km), and for NTL data with different noise levels (<0.6σ). In summary, the proposed framework offers a new opportunity to improve the quality of DMSP-OLS images and subsequently will be conducive to NTL-based applications, such as mapping urban extent, estimating socioeconomic variables, and exploring eco-impact of artificial lights.
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Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
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Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0034-4257 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2940
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Author Acuto, M.
Title We need a science of the night Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Nature Abbreviated Journal Nature
Volume 576 Issue 7787 Pages 339
Keywords (up) *Policy; *Society; *Commentary
Abstract (none)
Address Connected Cities Lab, University of Melbourne; michele.acuto(at)unimelb.edu.au
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Springer Nature Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0028-0836 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:31853076 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 2792
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Author Rayleigh, L.
Title Some Recent Work on the Light of the Night Sky1 Type Journal Article
Year 1928 Publication Nature Abbreviated Journal Nature
Volume 122 Issue 3070 Pages 315-317
Keywords (up) Airglow; Natural Sky Brightness
Abstract T is now well known that the light of the night sky has little in common with the day sky. When the sun is 18° below the horizon, and the moon also below the horizon, night conditions may be considered to be established. A clear sky is of course necessary for the study of the luminosity. Unlike the day sky, it is found to exhibit very little polarisation. The intensity is considerably below the threshold of colour vision, and subjective impressions about its colour, which is sometimes described by imaginative writers as blue, have no basis in reality.
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Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0028-0836 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3123
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