|   | 
Details
   web
Records
Author Gaynor, K.M.; Hojnowski, C.E.; Carter, N.H.; Brashares, J.S.
Title The influence of human disturbance on wildlife nocturnality Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Science (New York, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal Science
Volume 360 Issue 6394 Pages 1232-1235
Keywords (up)
Abstract Rapid expansion of human activity has driven well-documented shifts in the spatial distribution of wildlife, but the cumulative effect of human disturbance on the temporal dynamics of animals has not been quantified. We examined anthropogenic effects on mammal diel activity patterns, conducting a meta-analysis of 76 studies of 62 species from six continents. Our global study revealed a strong effect of humans on daily patterns of wildlife activity. Animals increased their nocturnality by an average factor of 1.36 in response to human disturbance. This finding was consistent across continents, habitats, taxa, and human activities. As the global human footprint expands, temporal avoidance of humans may facilitate human-wildlife coexistence. However, such responses can result in marked shifts away from natural patterns of activity, with consequences for fitness, population persistence, community interactions, and evolution.
Address Department of Environmental Science, Policy, and Management, University of California-Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher AAAS Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0036-8075 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:29903973 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1988
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Lammerts, W.E.
Title The effect of continuous light, high nutrient level and temperature on flowering of camellia hybrids Type Journal Article
Year 1949 Publication American Camellia Yearbook Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages 53-56
Keywords (up)
Abstract
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2466
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Su, Y.; Yue, J.; Liu, X.; Miller, S.D.; Ш, W.C.S.; Smith, S.M.; Guo, D.; Guo, S.
Title Mesospheric Bore Observations Using Suomi-NPP VIIRS DNB during 2013–2017 Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Remote Sensing Abbreviated Journal Remote Sensing
Volume 10 Issue 12 Pages 1935
Keywords (up) Airglow; Remote Sensing
Abstract This paper reports mesospheric bore events observed by Day/Night Band (DNB) of the Visible/Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) on the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration/National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NOAA/NASA) Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (NPP) environmental satellite over five years (2013–2017). Two types of special mesospheric bore events were observed, enabled by the wide field of view of VIIRS: extremely wide bores (>2000 km extension perpendicular to the bore propagation direction), and those exhibiting more than 15 trailing crests and troughs. A mesospheric bore event observed simultaneously from space and ground was investigated in detail. DNB enables the preliminary global observation of mesospheric bores for the first time. DNB mesospheric bores occurred more frequently in March, April and May. Their typical lengths are between 300 km and 1200 km. The occurrence rate of bores at low latitudes is higher than that at middle latitudes. Among the 61 bore events, 39 events occurred in the tropical region (20°S–20°N). The high occurrence rate of mesospheric bores during the spring months in the tropical region coincides with the reported seasonal and latitudinal variations of mesospheric inversion layers.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2072-4292 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2128
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Brown, J., Frank A.
Title Light and Molt in Weaver Finches Type Journal Article
Year 1940 Publication The Auk Abbreviated Journal The Auk
Volume 57 Issue 4 Pages 485-498
Keywords (up) Animals
Abstract
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0004-8038 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2366
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Dananay, K.L.; Benard, M.F.
Title Artificial light at night decreases metamorphic duration and juvenile growth in a widespread amphibian Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences Abbreviated Journal Proc. R. Soc. B
Volume 285 Issue 1882 Pages 20180367
Keywords (up) Animals
Abstract Artificial light at night (ALAN) affects over 20% of the earth's surface and is estimated to increase 6% per year. Most studies of ALAN have focused on a single mechanism or life stage. We tested for indirect and direct ALAN effects that occurred by altering American toads' (Anaxyrus americanus) ecological interactions or by altering toad development and growth, respectively. We conducted an experiment over two life stages using outdoor mesocosms and indoor terraria. In the first phase, the presence of ALAN reduced metamorphic duration and periphyton biomass. The effects of ALAN appeared to be mediated through direct effects on toad development, and we found no evidence for indirect effects of ALAN acting through altered ecological interactions or colonization. In the second phase, post-metamorphic toad growth was reduced by 15% in the ALAN treatment. Juvenile-stage ALAN also affected toad activity: in natural light, toads retreated into leaf litter at night whereas ALAN toads did not change behaviour. Carry-over effects of ALAN were also present; juvenile toads that had been exposed to larval ALAN exhibited marginally increased activity. In this time frame and system, our experiments suggested ALAN's effects act primarily through direct effects, rather than indirect effects, and can persist across life stages.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0962-8452 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1951
Permanent link to this record