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Author Guilford, T., Padget, O., Bond, S., & Syposz, M. M.
Title Light pollution causes object collisions during local nocturnal manoeuvring flight by adult Manx Shearwaters Puffinus puffinus Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Seabird Abbreviated Journal
Volume 31 Issue Pages 48-55
Keywords (up) Animals
Abstract Understanding the detrimental effects of anthropogenic light on nocturnally mobile animals is a long-standing problem in conservation biology. Seabirds such as shearwaters and petrels can be especially affected, perhaps because of their propensity to fly close to the surface, making them vulnerable to encountering anthropogenic light sources. We investigated the influence of light pollution on adult Manx Shearwaters Puffinus puffinus at close range in foggy conditions. We recorded collisions with a building at a breeding colony for six consecutive pairs of intervals in which the house lights were left on as normal for 135 seconds, then turned off for 135 seconds. The relationship between lighting condition and collision frequency was highly significant, with a collision rate in the presence of lighting around 25 times that in its absence. Our results show that birds were clearly affected by the lights, by being either directly attracted, or disorientated during flight close to the structure. This could have been due to the light source itself, or an indirect effect of the all-round reflective glow in the fog perhaps interfering with visual or magnetic control inputs on both sides of the bird simultaneously. Our results suggest a mechanism by which the screening of artificial lights close to shearwater breeding areas, at least during foggy nights, could lead to improved welfare and survival at breeding colonies.
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Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2357
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Author May, D.; Shidemantle, G.; Melnick-Kelley, Q.; Crane, K.; Hua, J.
Title The effect of intensified illuminance and artificial light at night on fitness and susceptibility to abiotic and biotic stressors Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Environmental Pollution Abbreviated Journal Environmental Pollution
Volume in press Issue Pages
Keywords (up) Animals
Abstract Changing light conditions due to human activities represents an important emerging environmental concern. Although changes to natural light conditions can be independently detrimental, in nature, organisms commonly face multiple stressors. To understand the consequences of altered light conditions, we exposed a model amphibian (wood frog; Lithobates sylvaticus) to a control and two anthropogenic light conditions: intensified daytime illuminance and artificial light at night – ALAN (intensified daytime illuminance + extended photoperiod). We measured (1) metrics of fitness (hatching success as well as survival to, size at, and time to metamorphosis) (2) susceptibility (time to death) to a commonly co-occurring anthropogenic stressor, road salt (NaCl) and (3) susceptibility (infection load) to a common parasite (trematode). We also explored behavioral (swimming activity) and physiological (baseline corticosterone (CORT) release rates) changes induced by these light conditions, which may mediate changes in the other measured parameters. We found that both intensified daytime illuminance and ALAN reduced hatching success. In contrast, for amphibians that successfully hatched, neither treatment affected amphibian survival or time to metamorphosis but individuals exposed to ALAN were larger at metamorphosis. The light treatments also had marginal effects; individuals in ALAN treatments were more susceptible to NaCl and trematodes. Finally, tadpoles exposed to ALAN moved significantly less than tadpoles in the control and intensified daytime illuminance treatments, while light had no effect on CORT release rate. Overall, changes in light conditions, in particular ALAN, significantly impacted an amphibian model in laboratory conditions. This work underscores the importance of considering not only the direct effects of light on fitness metrics but also the indirect effects of light with other abiotic and biotic stressors. Anthropogenic-induced changes to light conditions are expected to continue increasing over time so understanding the diverse consequences of shifting light conditions will be paramount to protecting wildlife populations.
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ISSN 0269-7491 ISBN Medium
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Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2381
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Author Bissonnette, T.H.
Title Modification of Mammalian Sexual Cycles; Reactions of Ferrets (Putorius vulgaris) of Both Sexes to Electric Light Added After Dark in November and December Type Journal Article
Year 1932 Publication Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences Abbreviated Journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
Volume 110 Issue 767 Pages 322-336
Keywords (up) Animals
Abstract Studies by Rowan (1930 and preceding papers) and Bissonnette (1931, a, b, 1932, a, b, and preceding papers) and Bissonnette and Wadlund (1931) have shown that in juncos, canaries, crows and starlings, at least, among birds, the sexual cycle is conditioned to a great degree by daily light ration. Sexual activity in both males and females can be modified at will by altering the daily light ration with controlled electric lighting from ordinary incandescent bulbs. Gonad changes, controllable in this way, are closely correlated with migrations in juncos and crows, as demonstrated by Rowan (1930, and preceding papers), who, however, maintains that it is the added periods of muscular exercise, rather than the light, as such, that condition these changes, in spite of the fact that it is always the added light he uses, rather than exercise, to get his effects. Bissonnette disagrees, and holds it is the light that is the major factor in conditioning the changes in sexual cycles. It has been found, also, that intensity and colour, or wave-length, as well as daily period of light are factors in conditioning sexual activity in starlings, and the method of increase of light also plays a part (Bissonnette, 1931, b, 1932 ; Bissonnette and Wadlund, 1931).
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ISSN 0962-8452 ISBN Medium
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Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2389
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Author Browman, L.G.
Title Light in its relation to activity and estrous rhythms in the albino rat Type Journal Article
Year 1937 Publication Journal of Experimental Zoology Abbreviated Journal J. Exp. Zool.
Volume 75 Issue 3 Pages 375-388
Keywords (up) Animals
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ISSN 0022-104X ISBN Medium
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Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2390
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Author Kennard, D.C.; Chamberlin, V.D.
Title All-night Light for Layers Type Report
Year 1931 Publication Abbreviated Journal
Volume Bulletin 476 Issue Pages
Keywords (up) Animals
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Corporate Author Ohio Agricultural Experiment Station Thesis
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Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2392
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