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Author Kumar, J.; Malik, S.; Bhardwaj, S.K.; Rani, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Bright light at night alters the perception of daylength in Indian weaver bird (Ploceus philippinus) Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Journal of Experimental Zoology. Part A, Ecological and Integrative Physiology Abbreviated Journal J Exp Zool A Ecol Integr Physiol  
  Volume 329 Issue 8-9 Pages 488-496  
  Keywords (up) Animals  
  Abstract The brighter nights have posed new challenges to the wild species by affecting their temporal physiology. The present study on Indian weaver bird (Ploceus philippinus) investigated if exposure to bright light at different phases of night affects their clock-mediated daily functions. Birds were placed individually in specially designed activity cages under short days and long nights (8L:16D; L = 100 lux, D < 0.1 lux) for approximately 3 weeks (19 days). Thereafter, they were divided into four groups (n = 6-9), and given approximately 2 lux light either for the entire night (ZT 08-24; zeitgeber time 0 = time of light on; pattern A) or for 4 hr (pattern B), placed in 16 hr night such that its onset coincides with the onset of night (early night group, ZT 08-12), its end with the end of night (late night group, ZT 20-24), or the night was interrupted in the middle (midnight group, ZT 14-18). The results showed that bright light in entire night induced early onset of day activity and fragmented rest at night, however, if given at different phases of night, it made the days longer by delaying end (early night group) or advancing onset of daily activity (late night group). It also suppressed the melatonin levels and increased body temperature. These results suggest that bright light at night alters the perception of daylength and affects the underlying physiology. The findings may be useful in adopting a strategy for use of night light without disturbing species fitness in their environment.  
  Address Department of Zoology, University of Lucknow, Lucknow, India  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2471-5638 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:30043408 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1971  
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Author Konkal, P.; Ganesh, C.B. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Exposure to low or high light intensity affects pituitary-testicular activity in the fish Oreochromis mossambicus Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Aquaculture Abbreviated Journal Aquaculture  
  Volume 497 Issue Pages 109-116  
  Keywords (up) Animals  
  Abstract Light is an important factor for the successful reproduction of most fish. In this investigation, effect of different light intensities on pituitary-testis axis was studied for a period of 21 days, under normal photoperiodic regime in the tilapia Oreochromis mossambicus. The mean numbers of spermatogonia (Sg), primary spermatocytes (Ps), secondary spermatocytes (Ss), early spermatids (Est) and late spermatids (Lst) did not show significant difference between fish exposed to moderate light intensity (MLI) and initial controls or controls, whereas the mean numbers of Sg were significantly lower in fish exposed to low light intensity (LLI) compared to those of initial controls, controls and MLI groups. However, the mean numbers of Ps, Ss, Est and Lst were significantly lower in fish exposed to LLI and high light intensity (HLI) compared to those of other experimental groups. Furthermore, in the pituitary gland, weakly immunoreactive luteinizing hormone (LH) secreting cells were observed in the proximal pars distalis (PPD) region in fish exposed to LLI and HLI in contrast to the intense immunolabelling of these cells in initial controls, controls and MLI groups. The androgen receptors showed diminished immunoreactivity in the Sertoli cells along the seminiferous lobules of the testis in fish exposed to LLI and HLI, whereas the strongly immunoreactive androgen receptors were observed in the Sertoli cells in initial controls, controls and MLI groups. Taken together, these results indicate that long-term exposure to low or high light intensity light suppresses spermatogenetic process and that this inhibition is due to reduced secretory activity of LH cells in the pituitary gland and androgen secretion in the testis of the fish O. mossambicus.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0044-8486 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1974  
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Author Firebaugh, A.; Haynes, K.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Light pollution may create demographic traps for nocturnal insects Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Basic and Applied Ecology Abbreviated Journal Basic and Applied Ecology  
  Volume 34 Issue Pages 118-125  
  Keywords (up) Animals  
  Abstract Light pollution impacts both intra- and inter-specific interactions, such as interactions between mates and predator–prey interactions. In mobile organisms attracted to artificial lights, the effect of light pollution on these interactions may be intensified. If organisms are repelled by artificial lights, effects of light pollution on intra- and inter-specific interactions may be diminished as organisms move away. However, organisms repelled by artificial lights would likely lose suitable habitat as light pollution expands. Thus, we investigated how light pollution affects both net attraction or repulsion of organisms and effects on intra- and inter-specific interactions. In manipulative field studies using fireflies, we found that Photuris versicolor and Photinus pyralis fireflies were lured to artificial (LED) light at night and that both species were less likely to engage in courtship dialogues (bioluminescent flashing) in light-polluted field plots. Light pollution also lowered the mating success of P. pyralis. P. versicolor is known to prey upon P. pyralis by mimicking the flash patterns of P. pyralis, but we did not find an effect of light pollution on Photuris–Photinus predator–prey interactions. Our study suggests, that for some nocturnal insects, light-polluted areas may act as demographic traps, i.e., areas where immigration exceeds emigration and inhibition of courtship dialogues and mating reduces reproduction. Examining multiple factors affecting population growth in concert is needed to understand and mitigate impacts of light pollution on wildlife.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1439-1791 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1978  
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Author El-Bakry, H.A.; Ismail, I.A.; Soliman, S.S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Immunosenescence-like state is accelerated by constant light exposure and counteracted by melatonin or turmeric administration through DJ-1/Nrf2 and P53/Bax pathways Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Journal of Photochemistry and Photobiology. B, Biology Abbreviated Journal J Photochem Photobiol B  
  Volume 186 Issue Pages 69-80  
  Keywords (up) Animals  
  Abstract The awareness of the interrelationship between immunosenescence and constant light exposure can provide new insights into the consequences of excessive exposure to light at night due to light pollution or shift work. Here, we investigated whether constant light exposure (LL) acts as an inducer of immunosenescence. We also determined the role of melatonin or turmeric in reversing the putative effects of constant light and explored for the first time the underlying molecular mechanisms. Young (3-4-month-old) rats were exposed daily to LL alone or in combination with each of melatonin and turmeric for 12weeks. A group of aged rats (18-months old; n=6) was used as a reference for natural immunosenescence. Constant light exposure resulted in remarkable pathophysiological alterations resembling those noticed in normal aged rats, manifested as apparent decreases in antioxidant activities as well as Nrf2 and DJ-1 expressions, striking augmentation in oxidative stress, proinflammatory cytokines and expression of TNFalpha, Bax, and p53 genes, and deleterious changes of lymphoid organs, Co-administration of melatonin or turmeric was able to reverse all alterations induced by LL through upregulation of Nrf2/DJ-1 and downregulation of p53/Bax pathways. These data suggest that LL accelerates immunosenescence via oxidative stress and apoptotic pathways. They also demonstrate for the first time that turmeric is comparable to melatonin in boosting the immune function and counteracting the LL-associated immunosenescence. These effects suggest that turmeric supplementation can be used as an inexpensive intervention to prevent circadian disruption-related immunosenescence. However, to validate the effects of turmeric on humans further studies are warranted.  
  Address Department of Zoology & Entomology, Faculty of Science, Minia University, Egypt  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1011-1344 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:30015062 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1984  
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Author Almaida-Pagan, P.F.; Ortega-Sabater, C.; Lucas-Sanchez, A.; Martinez-Nicolas, A.; Espinosa, C.; Esteban, M.A.; Madrid, J.A.; Rol, M.; Mendiola, P.; de Costa, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Impact of a shift work-like lighting schedule on the functioning of the circadian system in the short-lived fish Nothobranchius furzeri Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Experimental Gerontology Abbreviated Journal Exp Gerontol  
  Volume in press Issue Pages in press  
  Keywords (up) Animals  
  Abstract Adult Nothobranchius furzeri of the MZM-04/10 strain were individually kept and subjected to a “5+2” shifting lighting schedule (SHIFT) for 8weeks in order to evaluate the desynchronizing effects of a simulated human-like shift-work schedule on the functioning of the circadian system (CS). With this aim, sixteen 21-week-old N. furzeri were placed into a Morning, Night and Evening schedule (lights on from 08:00 to 16:00, 00:00 to 08:00 and 16:00 to 00:00h, respectively) and fed once a day in the middle of the corresponding photophase (12:00, 04:00 and 20:00h, respectively). Then, in the weekends (2days), fish were always returned to the Morning shift. As controls, 16 fish were maintained under a non-shifting LD cycle condition (CONTROL) throughout the whole experiment, with lights on from 08:00 to 16:00h. Rest-activity rhythm (RAR) of fish subjected to SHIFT showed several symptoms of chronodisruption, such as a decrease in the percentage of diurnal activity and a reduction of the relative amplitude and the circadian function index with time. When a periodogram analysis was performed, RAR of N. furzeri under SHIFT conditions showed up to three separate circadian components: one longer than 24h (26.5h) that followed the weekly 8h delays; a short-period component (~23h) that was related to the weekend's phase advances, and finally, a 24h component. The shifting LD schedule also affected fish CS at a molecular level, with several significant differences in the expression of core genes of the molecular clock (bmal1, clock, roralpha, rev-erbalpha) between SHIFT and CONTROL animals. RAR impairment along with changes in clock gene expression could be associated with high stress and accelerated aging in these fish.  
  Address Chronobiology Lab, Department of Physiology, College of Biology, University of Murcia, Mare Nostrum Campus, IUIE, IMIB-Arrixaca, Spain; Ciber Fragilidad y Envejecimiento Saludable (CIBERFES), Madrid, Spain  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0531-5565 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:30184464 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1999  
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