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Author Schottstädt, D. url  openurl
  Title Erfahrungen zur Anlockwirkung unterschiedlicher künstlicher Lichtquellen auf Nachtfalter (Lepidoptera: Macroheterocera) Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Sächsische Entomologische Zeitschrift Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 9 Issue Pages 120-140  
  Keywords (up) Animals  
  Abstract Light capture is the most effective method for the qualitative and quantitative collection of moths. This paper gives a brief overview of light traps installations, bulbs and their light spectrum, especially with respect to the ultraviolet radiation. In field ex-periments, various bulbs were used to study for their attractiveness to moths. In practical application, it should be noted that moths fly against the wind towards artificial light sources, they should be positioned so that the wind blows from the light source towards the biotope. For the manual light capture, almost all featured bulbs are suitable. If species of a larger catchment area are to be collected, higher-performance bulbs are recommend-ed, to attract more species and subjects. However, this could lead to more restlessness at the catchment, where considerable proportion of moths would only settle and found around the perimeter of the catchment area. For biotope-related light capture, stand-ardized systems with fluorescent tubes or more recently with LEDs are recommended, to enable comparison of studies. If comparison is not required, energy-saving lamps are recommended instead, because they have a higher light density with the same number of lumens, which entails a higher attracting effect. Mercury vapor and energy saving lamps have almost identical spectrum, but differ in power and its associated radiant energy. When these bulbs are used simultaneously, moths always fly towards the light source with the higher radiant energy. Therefore, it is not necessary to operate an energy-saving lamp or fluorescent tube next to a high-pressure lamp. Likewise, with the combination of su-peractinic, black light fluorescent tubes and energy-saving lamps. The superactinic lamp has a much higher radiation energy in the ultraviolet range and also has wavelengths in the blue range, while the black light lamp emits only certain wavelengths in the UV range.

Zusammenfassung.Der Lichtfang ist die effektivste Methode zur qualitativen und quantitativen Erfassung von Nachtfaltern. Es wird ein kurzer Überblick über Lichtfangan-lagen, Leuchtmittel und deren Lichtspektren, insbesondere mit Bezug auf die ultraviolette Strahlung gegeben. In Feldversuchen wurden verschiedene Leuchtmittel auf ihre Anlock-wirkung auf Nachtfalter verwendet. Im praktischen Einsatz ist dabei zu beachten, dass Nachtfalter gegen den Wind künstliche Lichtquellen anfliegen, so dass diese so aufgestellt werden sollten, dass der Wind vom Licht in den Biotop weht. Für den manuellen Lichtfang sind fast alle vorgestellten Leuchtmittel geeignet. Sollen die Arten eines größeren Einzugs-gebietes erfasst werden, sind leistungsstärkere Leuchtmittel zu empfehlen, mit denen etwas mehr Arten und sehr viel mehr Individuen angelockt werden. Dies geht aber mit mehr Unruhe an der Anlage einher und ein beträchtlicher Anteil der Falter setzt sich in der Umgebung der Anlage nieder, so dass die Umgebung nach Faltern abzusuchen ist. Für den biotopbezogenen Lichtfang sind standardisierte Anlagen mit Leuchtstoffröhren bzw. neuerdings mit LEDs zu empfehlen, um die eigenen Untersuchungen mit anderen vergleichen zu können. Ist dies nicht nötig, sind stattdessen Energiesparlampen empfe-hlenswert, da diese eine höhere Lichtdichte bei gleicher Lumenzahl aufweisen, was eine höhere Anlockwirkung mit sich bringt. Quecksilberdampf- und Energiesparlampen weisen fast identische Spektren auf, unterscheiden sich aber in der Leistung und der damit ver-bundenen Strahlungsenergie. Bei gleichzeitiger Verwendung dieser Leuchtmittel fliegen Nachtfalter immer die Lichtquelle mit der höheren Strahlungsenergie an. Deshalb ist es nicht erforderlich, neben einer Hochdrucklampe eine Energiesparlampe oder Leuchtst-offröhre zu betreiben. Ähnlich verhält es sich mit der Kombination superaktinischer und Schwarzlicht-Leuchtstoffröhren und Energiesparlampen. Die superaktinische Lampe hat eine viel höhere Strahlungsenergie im ultravioletten Bereich und besitzt auch Wellenlän-gen im blauen Bereich, während die Schwarzlichtlampe nur im UV-Bereich bestimmte Wellenlängen emittiert.
 
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language German Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2902  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Marín-Gómez, O.H.; García-Arroyo, M.; Sánchez-Sarria, C.E.; Sosa-López, J.R.; Santiago-Alarcon, D.; MacGregor-Fors, I. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Nightlife in the city: drivers of the occurrence and vocal activity of a tropical owl Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Avian Research Abbreviated Journal Avian Res  
  Volume 11 Issue 1 Pages in press  
  Keywords (up) Animals  
  Abstract Background

Cities differ from non-urban environments by the intensity, scale, and extent of anthropogenic pressures, which can drive the occurrence, physiology, and behavior of the organisms thriving in these settings. Traits as green cover often predict the occurrence patterns of bird species in urban areas. Yet, anthropogenic noise and artificial light at night (ALAN) could also limit the presence and disrupt the behavior of birds. However, there is still a dearth of knowledge about the influence of urbanization through noise and light pollution on nocturnal bird species ecology. In this study, we assessed the role of green cover, noise, and light pollution on the occurrence and vocal activity of the Mottled Owl (Ciccaba virgata) in the city of Xalapa (Mexico).

Methods

We obtained soundscape recordings in 61 independent sites scattered across the city of Xalapa using autonomous recording units. We performed a semi-automated acoustic analysis of the recordings, corroborating all Mottled Owl vocalizations. We calculated two measures of anthropogenic noise at each study site: daily noise (during 24 h) and masking noise (mean noise amplitude at night per site that could mask the owl’s vocalizations). We further performed generalized linear models to relate green cover, ALAN, daily noise, and masking noise in relation to the owl’s occurrence (i.e., detected, undetected). We also ran linear models to assess relationships among the beginning and ending of vocal activity with ALAN, and with the anthropogenic and masking noise levels at the moment of which vocalizations were emitted. Finally, we explored variations of the vocal activity of the Mottled Owl measured as vocalization rate across time.

Results

The presence of Mottled Owls increased with the size of green cover and decreased with increases in both artificial light at night and noise levels. At the temporal scale, green cover was positively related with the ending of the owl’s vocal activity, while daily noise and ALAN levels were not related to the timing and vocal output (i.e., number of vocalizations). Furthermore, the Mottled Owl showed a marked peak of vocal activity before dawn than after dusk. Although anthropogenic noise levels varied significantly across the assessed time, we did not find an association between high vocal output during time periods with lower noise levels.

Conclusions

Spatially, green cover area was positively related with the presence of the Mottled Owl in Xalapa, while high noise and light pollution were related to its absence. At a temporal scale, daily noise and ALAN levels were not related with the timing and vocal output. This suggests that instead of environmental factors, behavioral contexts such as territoriality and mate interactions could drive the vocal activity of the Mottled Owl. Further studies need to incorporate a wider seasonal scale in order to explore the variation of different vocalizations of this species in relation to environmental and biological factors.
 
  Address  
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  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2053-7166 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2912  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Riedel, C.S.; Georg, B.; Fahrenkrug, J.; Hannibal, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Altered light induced EGR1 expression in the SCN of PACAP deficient mice Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One  
  Volume 15 Issue 5 Pages e0232748  
  Keywords (up) Animals  
  Abstract The brain's biological clock is located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus and generates circadian rhythms in physiology and behavior. The circadian clock needs daily adjustment by light to stay synchronized (entrained) with the astronomical 24 h light/dark cycle. Light entrainment occurs via melanopsin expressing retinal ganglion cells (mRGCs) and two neurotransmitters of the retinohypothalamic tract (RHT), PACAP and glutamate, which transmit light information to the SCN neurons. In SCN neurons, light signaling involves the immediate-early genes Fos, Egr1 and the clock genes Per1 and Per2. In this study, we used PACAP deficient mice to evaluate PACAP's role in light induced gene expression of EGR1 in SCN neurons during early (ZT17) and late (ZT23) subjective night at high (300 lux) and low (10 lux) white light exposure. We found significantly lower levels of both EGR1 mRNA and protein in the SCN in PACAP deficient mice compared to wild type mice at early subjective night (ZT17) exposed to low but not high light intensity. No difference was found between the two genotypes at late night (ZT23) at neither light intensities. In conclusion, light mediated EGR1 induction in SCN neurons at early night at low light intensities is dependent of PACAP signaling. A role of PACAP in shaping synaptic plasticity during light stimulation at night is discussed.  
  Address Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Faculty of Health Sciences, Bispebjerg Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen NV, Denmark  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1932-6203 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:32379800; PMCID:PMC7205239 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2915  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Lieske, D.J.; Tranquilla, L.M.F.; Ronconi, R.A.; Abbott, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title “Seas of risk”: Assessing the threats to colonial-nesting seabirds in Eastern Canada Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Marine Policy Abbreviated Journal Marine Policy  
  Volume 115 Issue Pages 103863  
  Keywords (up) Animals  
  Abstract This study presents the results of the first broad-scale, spatial cumulative impact analysis (SCIA) conducted for colonial-nesting seabirds at-sea in eastern Canada. Species distribution models, based on at-sea tracking data for thirteen species/groups of seabirds (n = 520 individuals), were applied to over 5000 species-specific colonies to map relative abundance patterns across the entire region. This information was combined with distributional data for a number of key anthropogenic threats to quantify exposure to fisheries, light and ship-source oil pollution, and marine traffic. As a final step, information about species-specific sensitivity to each threat was integrated to compute region-wide cumulative risk.

The data products permit the visualization of the interaction between species and threats, and confirm that large portions of the coastal zones of Nova Scotia and Newfoundland, as well as the Grand Banks shelf break, constitute areas where breeding seabirds experience the highest potential impact. The cumulative risk maps revealed that species which were either widespread throughout coastal areas (e.g., gulls), or capable of foraging long distance (Leach's Storm-Petrel), were most at risk. Cumulative risk maps help identify appropriate and potentially effective management and conservation actions, and are of value to federal regulators responsible for managing cumulative effects as part of the new Canadian Impact Assessment Act. They also can assist marine planners achieve the Aichi marine conservation targets as specified by the Convention on Biodiversity. By filling a knowledge gap for a large potion of the northwest Atlantic, these results help to counter the “shifting baselines syndrome”.
 
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0308597X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2941  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Baekelandt, S.; Milla, S.; Cornet, V.; Flamion, E.; Ledore, Y.; Redivo, B.; Antipine, S.; Mandiki, S.N.M.; Houndji, A.; El Kertaoui, N.; Kestemont, P. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Seasonal simulated photoperiods influence melatonin release and immune markers of pike perch Sander lucioperca Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Scientific Reports Abbreviated Journal Sci Rep  
  Volume 10 Issue 1 Pages 2650  
  Keywords (up) Animals  
  Abstract Melatonin is considered as the time-keeping hormone acting on important physiological functions of teleosts. While the influence of melatonin on reproduction and development is well described, its potential role on immune functions has little been considered. In order to better define an immune modulation by the melatonin hormone, we hypothesized that natural variations of photoperiod and subsequent changes in melatonin release profile may act on immune status of pikeperch. Therefore, we investigated during 70 days the effects of two photoperiod regimes simulating the fall and spring in western Europe, on pikeperch physiological and immune responses. Samples were collected at 04:00 and 15:00 at days 1, 37 and 70. Growth, plasma melatonin levels, innate immune markers and expression of immune-relevant genes in head kidney tissue were assessed. While growth and stress level were not affected by the seasonal simulated photoperiods, nocturnal levels of plasma melatonin were photoperiod-dependent. Innate immune markers, including lysozyme, complement, peroxidase and phagocytic activities, were stimulated by the fall-simulated photoperiod and a significant correlation was made with plasma melatonin. In addition to bring the first evidence of changes in fish immunocompetence related to photoperiod, our results provide an additional indication supporting the immunomodulatory action of melatonin in teleosts.  
  Address Research Unit in Environmental and Evolutionary Biology (URBE), Institute of Life, Earth & Environment, University of Namur, Rue de Bruxelles 61, Namur, B-5000, Belgium  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2045-2322 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:32060347; PMCID:PMC7021833 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2942  
Permanent link to this record
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