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Author Cabrera-Cruz, S.A.; Cohen, E.B.; Smolinsky, J.A.; Buler, J.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Artificial Light at Night is Related to Broad-Scale Stopover Distributions of Nocturnally Migrating Landbirds along the Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Remote Sensing Abbreviated Journal Remote Sensing  
  Volume 12 Issue 3 Pages 395  
  Keywords (up) Animals  
  Abstract The distributions of birds during migratory stopovers are influenced by a hierarchy of factors. For example, in temperate regions, migrants are concentrated near areas of bright artificial light at night (ALAN) and also the coastlines of large water bodies at broad spatial scales. However, less is known about what drives broad-scale stopover distributions in the tropics. We quantified seasonal densities of nocturnally migrating landbirds during spring and fall of 2011–2015, using two weather radars on the Yucatan peninsula, Mexico (Sabancuy and Cancun). We tested the influence of environmental predictors in explaining broad-scale bird stopover densities. We predicted higher densities in areas (1) closer to the coast in the fall and farther away in spring and (2) closer to bright ALAN and with lower ALAN intensity in both seasons. We found that birds were more concentrated near the coastline in the fall and away from it in spring around Cancun but not Sabancuy. Counter to our expectations, we detected increased bird densities with increased distance from lights in spring around Sabancuy, and in both seasons around Cancun, suggesting avoidance of bright areas during those seasons. This is the first evidence of broad-scale bird avoidance of bright areas during stopover.  
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  ISSN 2072-4292 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3004  
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Author Alquezar, R.D.; Macedo, R.H.; Sierro, J.; Gil, D. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Lack of consistent responses to aircraft noise in dawn song timing of bird populations near tropical airports Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology Abbreviated Journal Behav Ecol Sociobiol  
  Volume 74 Issue 7 Pages  
  Keywords (up) Animals  
  Abstract Birds living near airports can reduce the noise interference by advancing their dawn chorus timing and avoiding the start of airport operations. Data supporting this finding come from temperate areas, but little is known from tropical environments, where seasonal variation is lower and biodiversity is higher. Here, we investigated whether 15 tropical bird species are able to advance their dawn song and avoid aircraft noise interference. We sampled dawn song in three airports and three control sites in Brazil, using automated recording units. We found that dawn song times were not globally affected by the exposure to airport noise. Instead, changes were highly variable and species-specific, as dawn song onset was significantly advanced in two and delayed in four species. This large variation in responses was surprising given patterns found in previous studies. Indeed, this is the first time that a significant delay is reported for bird’s dawn song. We explored whether between-species differences in this response could be explained by additional variables (song frequency, degree of urbanity, and noise release), but none of them explained the direction or the strength of the changes. We suggest that earlier airport activity and shorter variations in day length and in twilight duration of tropical areas may be restricting birds’ ability to change dawn song timing. Further studies should consider these differences and analyze to what extent populational declines in noisy areas and the resultant reduced competition for acoustic space may be affecting the changes in dawn chorus onset time.  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0340-5443 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3017  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Brauckhoff, M.; Wahlberg, M.; Haga, J.Å.R.; Karlsen, H.E.; Wilson, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Embracing Their Prey at That Dark Hour: Common Cuttlefish (Sepia officinalis) Can Hunt in Nighttime Light Conditions Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Frontiers in Physiology Abbreviated Journal Front. Physiol.  
  Volume 11 Issue Pages in press  
  Keywords (up) Animals  
  Abstract Cuttlefish are highly efficient predators, which strongly rely on their anterior binocular visual field for hunting and prey capture. Their complex eyes possess adaptations for low light conditions. Recently, it was discovered that they display camouflaging behavior at night, perhaps to avoid detection by predators, or to increase their nighttime hunting success. This raises the question whether cuttlefish are capable of foraging during nighttime. In the present study, prey capture of the common cuttlefish (Sepiaofficinalis) was filmed with a high-speed video camera in different light conditions.Experiments were performed in daylight and with near-infrared light sources in two simulated nightlight conditions, as well as in darkness. The body of the common cuttlefish maintained a velocity of less than 0.1 m/s during prey capture, while the tentacles during the seizing phase reached velocities of up to 2.5 m/s and accelerations reached more than 450 m/s2 for single individuals. There was no significant difference between the day and nighttime trials, respectively. In complete darkness, the common cuttlefish was unable to catch any prey. Our results show that the common cuttlefish are capable of catching prey during day- and nighttime light conditions. The common cuttlefish employ similar sensory motor systems and prey capturing techniques during both day- and nighttime conditions.  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1664-042X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3021  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Bolliger, J.; Hennet, T.; Wermelinger, B.; Bösch, R.; Pazur, R.; Blum, S.; Haller, J.; Obrist, M.K. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of traffic-regulated street lighting on nocturnal insect abundance and bat activity Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Basic and Applied Ecology Abbreviated Journal Basic and Applied Ecology  
  Volume in press Issue Pages in press  
  Keywords (up) Animals  
  Abstract New technological developments modulate the light levels of LED street luminaires according to traffic volumes: light levels are increased given traffic and reduced in its absence. Such dimming of street lights reduces the level of artificial light at night (ALAN) and may thus contribute to mitigate light pollution. To quantify the impact of traffic-driven dimming of street lights on nocturnal insect abundance and bat activity in comparison to full light (i.e., dimming functions of luminaires switched off), we mounted 20 insect flight-interception traps and ten batloggers on street light poles along two dimmable street light sections. Insect abundance and bat activity were measured alternately with one week of full street lighting followed by a week with light levels modulated by traffic volumes. In total, 16 dimmed and 16 full-light days were investigated. Overall, traffic-driven dimming reduced light levels by 35%. Weather conditions (warm, dry nights) were the main drivers of insect abundance and bat activity, but traffic-driven dimming resulted in lower numbers of insects caught and reduced bat activity. Among insect groups, Heteroptera benefited most from dimming. For bats, urban exploiters (Pipistrellus spp.) benefited from increased availability of prey at brightly lit street lights, while less frequent species (Myotis spp.) did not benefit from street lighting. We conclude that street light dimming technology may contribute to mitigate negative effects of ALAN on nocturnal organisms, although the measure may not be efficient enough to support light-sensitive and threatened species.  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1439-1791 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3027  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Rosolen, S.-G.; Brugère-Picoux, J.; Leroy, E. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Le chat est-il une victime collatérale de la pollution lumineuse? // Is the cat a victim of light pollution? Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Bulletin de l'Académie Vétérinaire de France Abbreviated Journal Bul. de l'Ac. Vét. de France  
  Volume in press Issue 2 Pages  
  Keywords (up) Animals  
  Abstract There are more than 75 million cats in Europe, a number that is constantly increasing. It is an animal that adapts very well to a reduced space and can live alone. However, it is also a preda-tor, a behavior that requires frequent wandering away from its familiar environment. Along with the dog, it is the most medicalized animal species and whose life expectancy is increasing. Living in close contact with man, it shares its environment, and is thus subjected to the same environmental impacts such as light pollution : reduction of darkness in time and space and its replacement by artificial light. A recent study has shown that 45% of sedentary cats are overweight or even obese. We hypothesize that among the factors favouring obesity, the extension of domestic lighting would play an important role. In human, obesity is a risk factor for the development of type 2 diabetes, which is a public health problem. The same is true for obese cats. As a clinical expression of a homologous human disease, it is THE animal model of type 2 diabetes so much sought after by the scientific community. Light pollution presents another risk for the wandering cat: the probability of encountering wild animals (rodents, mus-telids, birds, etc.) which, especially during the confinement period, are attracted by the space released by humans. This risk is important to consider because of the cat’s sensitivity to coronaviruses, in particular Sars-CoV-2, which it is likely to contract from with the wild animals that it may encounter. In the context of a pandemic situation, the question of unrestricted itinerancy of cats must be addressed. Cats should only be allowed to roam freely when they are vaccinated and undergo regular anti-parasite treatments.

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Il y a plus de 75 millions de chats en Europe et leur nombre ne cesse d’augmenter. C’est un animal qui s’accommode très bien d’un espace réduit, qui peut rester seul mais c’est aussi un chasseur qui peut demander à sortir fréquemment de son environnement familier. Avec le chien, c’est l’espèce animale de compagnie la plus médicalisée et dont l’espérance de vie augmente. Il vit étroitement au contact de l’homme, partage son environnement et est soumis aux mêmes impacts environnementaux que ce der-nier, notamment la pollution lumineuse ; c’est à dire la réduction de la part d’obscurité en temps et en espace et son remplacement par des lumières artificielles. Une étude récente a montré que 45% des chats sédentaires sont en surpoids, voire obèses. Nous émettons l’hypothèse que, parmi les facteurs favorisant l’obésité, l’allongement de l’éclairage domestique jouerait un rôle important. Chez l’homme, l’obésité est un facteur de risque d’apparition du diabète (type 2) qui est un problème de santé publique. Chez le chat obèse, il en est de même. Exprimant cliniquement la maladie humaine homologue c’est LE modèle animal de diabète de type 2 tant recherché par la communauté scientifique. La pollution lumineuse fait courir un autre risque au chat qui se promène : la probabilité de rencontre avec la faune sauvage (ron-geurs, mustélidés, oiseaux, etc.) qui, notamment en cas de confinement, est attirée par l’espace libéré par l’homme. Ce risque est d’autant plus à prendre en considération que le chat est une espèce sensible aux coronaviroses, notamment le Sars-CoV-2 qu’il pourrait contracter au contact de la faune sauvage. Dans un contexte de pandémie, la question de la libre circulation des chats doit se poser et ne devraient sortir librement que les animaux vaccinés et subissant régulièrement des traitements antiparasitaires.
 
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language French Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2259-2385 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3053  
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