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Author Underhill, V.A.; Höbel, G. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Mate choice behavior of female Eastern Gray Treefrogs (Hyla versicolor) is robust to anthropogenic light pollution Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Ethology Abbreviated Journal Ethology  
  Volume 124 Issue 8 Pages 537-548  
  Keywords (up) Animals  
  Abstract Human activities are drastically changing the amount of artificial light entering natural habitats. Because light pollution alters the sensory environment, it may interfere with behaviors ranging from prey detection and vigilance to mate choice. Here, we test the hypothesis that anthropogenic light pollution affects the mate choice behavior of female Eastern Gray Treefrogs (Hyla versicolor). We tested this hypothesis under two experimental light treatments that simulate the light pollution created by streetlights (expansion of lit areas and increased light intensity), and the light pollution created by headlights of passing vehicles (rapid fluctuations between bright and dark conditions). The hypothesis predicts that females tested under conditions simulating light pollution will show behavioral changes geared toward mitigating detection by predators, such as relaxed preferences, decreased choosiness for the normally preferred call, and differences in approach behavior (either more directional, faster, or stealthier movements, or no approach at all). Contrary to our prediction, we found that light pollution did not affect mate choice behavior in Gray Treefrogs, and should therefore neither interfere with population persistence nor affect the sexual selection regimes on male call traits of this species. However, we caution that this result does not imply that anthropogenic light pollution is of no concern for amphibian conservation, because behavioral responses to variation in nocturnal light levels (both in the natural as well as anthropogenically enhanced range) seem to be highly species‐specific in anurans. We encourage additional studies to help gage the vulnerability of anurans to anthropogenic light pollution.  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0179-1613 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number NC @ ehyde3 @ Serial 2090  
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Author Froidevaux, J.S.P.; Fialas, P.C.; Jones, G.; Pettorelli, N.; Merchant, N. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Catching insects while recording bats: impacts of light trapping on acoustic sampling Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Remote Sensing in Ecology and Conservation Abbreviated Journal Remote Sens Ecol Conserv  
  Volume 4 Issue 3 Pages 240-247  
  Keywords (up) Animals  
  Abstract Collecting information on bat prey availability usually involves the use of light traps to capture moths and flies that constitute the main prey items of most insectivorous bats. However, despite the recent awareness on the adverse effects of light on bats, little is known regarding the potential impacts of light trapping on the bat sampling outcomes when passive acoustic sampling and light trapping are implemented simultaneously. Using a before–after experimental design that involved the installation of a 6 W actinic light trap 1 m away from the bat detector, we tested the predictions that (1) slow‐flying bat species will be less active when the light trap is present, while the opposite will be true for fast‐flying species; and (2) bat species richness will be lower at lit conditions compared to dark ones. Our results suggest that the use of light traps in combination with bat detectors may considerably influence the outcomes of acoustic sampling. Although the activity of fast‐flying bat species did not differ between the two treatments, we found that the activity of slow‐flying ones such as Rhinolophus ferrumequinum and Rhinolophus hipposideros decreased significantly at lit conditions. Furthermore, we recorded fewer bat species when the light trap was deployed. To overcome this issue, we strongly recommend either (1) placing light traps at a considerable distance from bat detectors; or (2) using light traps during the night that follows the bat sampling if sampling needs to be at the same position; or (3) deploying non‐attractant insect traps such as Malaise traps if Lepidoptera is not the main order targeted.  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2056-3485 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number NC @ ehyde3 @ Serial 2092  
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Author Zhou, Y.; Zhang, H.-K.; Liu, F.; Lei, G.; Liu, P.; Jiao, T.; Dang, Y.-H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Altered Light Conditions Contribute to Abnormalities in Emotion and Cognition Through HINT1 Dysfunction in C57BL/6 Mice Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Frontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience Abbreviated Journal Front Behav Neurosci  
  Volume 12 Issue Pages 110  
  Keywords (up) Animals  
  Abstract In recent years, the environmental impact of artificial light at night has been a rapidly growing global problem, affecting 99% of the population in the US and Europe, and 62% of the world population. The present study utilized a mouse model exposed to long-term artificial light and light deprivation to explore the impact of these conditions on emotion and cognition. Based on the potential links between histidine triad nucleotide binding protein 1 (HINT1) and mood disorders, we also examined the expression of HINT1 and related apoptosis factors in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), prefrontal cortex (PFC), nucleus accumbens (NAc) and hippocampus (Hip). Mice exposed to constant light (CL) exhibited depressive- and anxiety-like behaviors, as well as impaired spatial memory, as demonstrated by an increased immobility time in the tail suspension and forced swimming tests, less entries and time spent in the open arms of elevated plus-maze, and less platform site crossings and time spent in the target quadrant in the Morris water maze (MWM). The effects of constant darkness (CD) partially coincided with long-term illumination, except that mice in the CD group failed to show anxiety-like behaviors. Furthermore, HINT1 was upregulated in four encephalic regions, indicating that HINT1 may be involved in mood disorders and cognitive impairments due to altered light exposure. The apoptosis-related proteins, BAX and BCL-2, showed the opposite expression pattern, reflecting an activated apoptotic pathway. These findings suggest that exposure to CL and/or darkness can induce significant changes in affective and cognitive responses, possibly through HINT1-induced activation of apoptotic pathways.  
  Address College of Medicine & Forensics, Xi'an Jiaotong University Health Science Center, Xi'an, China  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1662-5153 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:29937721; PMCID:PMC6002487 Approved no  
  Call Number NC @ ehyde3 @ Serial 2094  
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Author Deppe, L.; Rowley, O.; Rowe, L.K.; Shi, N.; McArthur, N.; Gooday, O.; Goldstien, S.J. url  openurl
  Title Investigation of fallout events in Hutton’s shearwaters (Puffinus huttoni) associated with artificial lighting Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Notornis Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 64 Issue 4 Pages 181-191  
  Keywords (up) Animals  
  Abstract The risk of disorientation by artificial lights and subsequent ‘fallout’ has become a widely recognised issue for nocturnal procellariiform species. Using data from community-based rescue campaigns and systematic research, we assessed the characteristics of fallout events observed in fledglings of the threatened New Zealand endemic Hutton’s shearwater (Puffinus huttoni) or Kaikōura tītī. Despite strong annual variation in observed fallout numbers, the proportion of annually produced fledglings collected as ‘fallout birds’ remained below 1% each year. Among those, more than 80% survived due to community rescue efforts. Fallout was found to increase significantly during new moon, while weather effects remained inconclusive. Most fallout occurred within brightly lit areas of Kaikōura township, particularly along its coastal roads. High light source densities and high wattage lights appeared to be influential in some areas but could only partly explain the spatial distribution of fallout at this small scale.  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
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  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number NC @ ehyde3 @ Serial 2102  
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Author Behera, S.K.; Mohanta, R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Total An Investigation into Light Pollution as a Limiting factor for shift of Mass nesting ground at Rushikulya rookery Ganjam Odishas Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication American Journal of Marine Research and Reviews Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 1 Issue 6 Pages  
  Keywords (up) Animals  
  Abstract Illumination due to artificial lights on nesting beaches and from nearby place to nesting beaches is detrimental to sea turtles because it alters critical nocturnal behaviors specifically, their choice of nesting sites and their return path to the sea after nesting. Illuminations perplex the hatchlings to find sea after emerging. Numerous studies conducted in other countries have demonstrated that artificial lights negatively impact on turtles, both female adults as they come to and go from their home beach to lay eggs, and to turtle hatchlings as they seek out the way to the open ocean. In this study we correlated the mass nesting intensity of 5years (2012 to 2018) at Rushikulya mass nesting site to the illumination zone. Illumination due to light conditions on nesting beaches are complex, and measuring light pollution in a way that effectively captures the impacts to sea turtles is difficult. But increase in intensity of illumination on selective mass nesting beaches showed gradual reduction in intensity of preferred nesting site during the mass nesting event. A gradual shift of nesting preference was also observed more toward darker zone.  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number NC @ ehyde3 @ Serial 2104  
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