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Author Mireku, M.O.; Barker, M.M.; Mutz, J.; Dumontheil, I.; Thomas, M.S.C.; Roosli, M.; Elliott, P.; Toledano, M.B.
Title Night-time screen-based media device use and adolescents' sleep and health-related quality of life Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Environment International Abbreviated Journal Environ Int
Volume 124 Issue Pages 66-78
Keywords Human Health
Abstract OBJECTIVE: The present study investigates the relationship between night-time screen-based media devices (SBMD) use, which refers to use within 1h before sleep, in both lit and dark rooms, and sleep outcomes and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) among 11 to 12-year-olds. METHODS: We analysed baseline data from a large cohort of 6616 adolescents from 39 schools in and around London, United Kingdom, participating in the Study of Cognition Adolescents and Mobile Phone (SCAMP). Adolescents self-reported their use of any SBMD (mobile phone, tablet, laptop, television etc.). Sleep variables were derived from self-reported weekday and/or weekend bedtime, sleep onset latency (SOL) and wake time. Sleep quality was assessed using four standardised dimensions from the Swiss Health Survey. HRQoL was estimated using the KIDSCREEN-10 questionnaire. RESULTS: Over two-thirds (71.5%) of adolescents reported using at least one SBMD at night-time, and about a third (32.2%) reported using mobile phones at night-time in darkness. Night-time mobile phone and television use was associated with higher odds of insufficient sleep duration on weekdays (Odds Ratio, OR=1.82, 95% Confidence Interval, CI [1.59, 2.07] and OR=1.40, 95% CI [1.23, 1.60], respectively). Adolescents who used mobile phones in a room with light were more likely to have insufficient sleep (OR=1.32, 95% CI [1.10, 1.60]) and later sleep midpoint (OR=1.64, 95% CI [1.37, 1.95]) on weekends compared to non-users. The magnitude of these associations was even stronger for those who used mobile phones in darkness for insufficient sleep duration on weekdays (OR=2.13, 95% CI [1.79, 2.54]) and for later sleep midpoint on weekdays (OR=3.88, 95% CI [3.25, 4.62]) compared to non-users. Night-time use of mobile phones was associated with lower HRQoL and use in a dark room was associated with even lower KIDSCREEN-10 score (beta=-1.18, 95% CI [-1.85, -0.52]) compared to no use. CONCLUSIONS: We found consistent associations between night-time SBMD use and poor sleep outcomes and worse HRQoL in adolescents. The magnitude of these associations was stronger when SBMD use occurred in a dark room versus a lit room.
Address MRC-PHE Centre for Environment and Health, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, W2 1PG, UK; National Institute for Health Research Health Protection Research Unit in Health Impact of Environmental Hazards at King's College London, a Partnership with Public Health England, and collaboration with Imperial College London, W2 1PG, UK. Electronic address: m.toledano@imperial.ac.uk
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language (down) English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0160-4120 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:30640131 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2181
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Author Barghini, A.; de Medeiros, B.A.S.
Title Artificial lighting as a vector attractant and cause of disease diffusion Type Journal Article
Year 2010 Publication Environmental Health Perspectives Abbreviated Journal Environ Health Perspect
Volume 118 Issue 11 Pages 1503-1506
Keywords Human Health
Abstract BACKGROUND: Traditionally, epidemiologists have considered electrification to be a positive factor. In fact, electrification and plumbing are typical initiatives that represent the integration of an isolated population into modern society, ensuring the control of pathogens and promoting public health. Nonetheless, electrification is always accompanied by night lighting that attracts insect vectors and changes people's behavior. Although this may lead to new modes of infection and increased transmission of insect-borne diseases, epidemiologists rarely consider the role of night lighting in their surveys. OBJECTIVE: We reviewed the epidemiological evidence concerning the role of lighting in the spread of vector-borne diseases to encourage other researchers to consider it in future studies. DISCUSSION: We present three infectious vector-borne diseases-Chagas, leishmaniasis, and malaria-and discuss evidence that suggests that the use of artificial lighting results in behavioral changes among human populations and changes in the prevalence of vector species and in the modes of transmission. CONCLUSION: Despite a surprising lack of studies, existing evidence supports our hypothesis that artificial lighting leads to a higher risk of infection from vector-borne diseases. We believe that this is related not only to the simple attraction of traditional vectors to light sources but also to changes in the behavior of both humans and insects that result in new modes of disease transmission. Considering the ongoing expansion of night lighting in developing countries, additional research on this subject is urgently needed.
Address Laboratorio de Estudos Evolutivos Humanos, Departamento de Genetica e Biologia Evolutiva, Instituto de Biociencias, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, Brasil. barghini@iee.usp.br
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language (down) English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0091-6765 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:20675268; PMCID:PMC2974685 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2184
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Author Prayag, A.S.; Najjar, R.P.; Gronfier, C.
Title Melatonin suppression is exquisitely sensitive to light and primarily driven by melanopsin in humans Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Journal of Pineal Research Abbreviated Journal J Pineal Res
Volume 66 Issue 4 Pages e12562
Keywords Human Health; melatonin suppression; melanopic illuminance
Abstract INTRODUCTION: Light elicits a range of non-visual responses in humans. Driven predominantly by intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs), but also by rods and/or cones, these responses include melatonin suppression. A sigmoidal relationship has been established between melatonin suppression and light intensity, however photoreceptoral involvement remains unclear. METHODS AND RESULTS: In this study, we first modelled the relationships between alpha-opic illuminances and melatonin suppression using an extensive dataset by Brainard and colleagues. Our results show that 1) melatonin suppression is better predicted by melanopic illuminance compared to other alpha-opic illuminances, 2) melatonin suppression is predicted to occur at levels as low as ~1.5 melanopic lux (melanopsin-weighted irradiance 0.2 muW/cm(2)), 3) saturation occurs at 305 melanopic lux (melanopsin-weighted irradiance 36.6 muW/cm(2)). We then tested this melanopsin-weighted illuminance response model derived from Brainard and colleagues' data and show that it predicts equally well melatonin suppression data from our laboratory, although obtained using different intensities and exposure duration. DISCUSSION: Together, our findings suggest that melatonin suppression by monochromatic lights is predominantly driven by melanopsin, and that it can be initiated at extremely low melanopic lux levels in experimental conditions. This emphasizes the concern of the non-visual impacts of low light intensities in lighting design and light-emitting devices. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
Address Lyon Neuroscience Research Center, Integrative Physiology of the Brain Arousal Systems, Waking team, Inserm UMRS 1028, CNRS UMR 5292, Universite Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Universite de Lyon, F-69000, Lyon, France
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language (down) English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0742-3098 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:30697806 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2186
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Author Jechow, A.; Holker, F.; Kyba, C.C.M.
Title Using all-sky differential photometry to investigate how nocturnal clouds darken the night sky in rural areas Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Scientific Reports Abbreviated Journal Sci Rep
Volume 9 Issue 1 Pages 1391
Keywords Skyglow; differential photometry; clouds; sky brightness
Abstract Artificial light at night has affected most of the natural nocturnal landscapes worldwide and the subsequent light pollution has diverse effects on flora, fauna and human well-being. To evaluate the environmental impacts of light pollution, it is crucial to understand both the natural and artificial components of light at night under all weather conditions. The night sky brightness for clear skies is relatively well understood and a reference point for a lower limit is defined. However, no such reference point exists for cloudy skies. While some studies have examined the brightening of the night sky by clouds in urban areas, the published data on the (natural) darkening by clouds is very sparse. Knowledge of reference points for the illumination of natural nocturnal environments however, is essential for experimental design and ecological modeling to assess the impacts of light pollution. Here we use differential all-sky photometry with a commercial digital camera to investigate how clouds darken sky brightness at two rural sites. The spatially resolved data enables us to identify and study the nearly unpolluted parts of the sky and to set an upper limit on ground illumination for overcast nights at sites without light pollution.
Address GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences, Remote Sensing, Telegrafenberg, 14473, Potsdam, Germany
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language (down) English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2045-2322 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:30718668; PMCID:PMC6361923 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 2188
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Author Meier, J.
Title Contentious Light: An Analytical Framework for Lighting Conflicts Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication International Journal of Sustainable Lighting Abbreviated Journal
Volume 20 Issue 1 Pages 62-77
Keywords Society; Lighting; Planning
Abstract This paper takes into view the broad range of contemporary conflicts regarding outdoor lighting. It proposes a working-definition that allows for differentiating lighting conflicts from other forms of lighting-related contention, as well as an analytical framework that allows for the structured description of individual lighting conflicts, and the comparative analysis of multiple cases. The analytical framework was developed based on the social-scientific analysis of media reports of existing conflict cases in Europe and North America, and informed by existing knowledge from the fields of lighting and conflict studies. A central challenge for developing such a framework is dealing with the high level of contingency and complexity of lighting conflicts. The framework reduces this complexity by focusing its field of vision to those aspects that are directly related to the lighting and its contestation. For each of these aspects, it provides sets of descriptive variables that allow for describing the conflicts’ individuality in a standardized – and thus comparable – way. The framework strictly separates the regarded aspects from their judgment by the conflict parties, making it possible to contrast their views on one and the same lighting situation. A visual template supports the process of analysis. It allows for depicting individual cases in short, and for clearly identifying where perspectives differ. At the multiple-case level, the framework not only opens up possibilities for spatial and temporal comparisons of lighting conflicts and the subsequent development of typologies, but also for harnessing their potential for informing the development of more sustainable planning and policy approaches for artificial lighting.
Address Department of Urban and Regional Planning, Technische Universität Berlin, Germany; josiane.meier(at)tu-berlin.de
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher IJSL Place of Publication Editor
Language (down) English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2190
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