toggle visibility Search & Display Options

Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print
  Records Links
Author Emmer, K.M.; Russart, K.L.G.; Walker, W.H.; Nelson, R.J.; DeVries, A.C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of light at night on laboratory animals and research outcomes Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Behavioral Neuroscience Abbreviated Journal Behav Neurosci  
  Volume 132 Issue 4 Pages 302-314  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract Light has substantial influences on the physiology and behavior of most laboratory animals. As such, lighting conditions within animal rooms are potentially significant and often underappreciated variables within experiments. Disruption of the light/dark cycle, primarily by exposing animals to light at night (LAN), disturbs biological rhythms and has widespread physiological consequences because of mechanisms such as melatonin suppression, sympathetic stimulation, and altered circadian clock gene expression. Thus, attention to the lighting environment of laboratory animals and maintaining consistency of a light/dark cycle is imperative for study reproducibility. Light intensity, as well as wavelength, photoperiod, and timing, are all important variables. Although modern rodent facilities are designed to facilitate appropriate light cycling, there are simple ways to modify rooms to prevent extraneous light exposure during the dark period. Attention to lighting conditions of laboratory animals by both researchers and research care staff ensures best practices for maintaining animal welfare, as well as reproducibility of research results. (PsycINFO Database Record  
  Address Rockefeller Neuroscience Institute, West Virginia University  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0735-7044 ISBN Medium (up)  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:29952608 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1957  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Maroni, M.J.; Capri, K.M.; Cushman, A.V.; Monteiro De Pina, I.K.; Chasse, M.H.; Seggio, J.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Constant light alters serum hormone levels related to thyroid function in male CD-1 mice Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Chronobiology International Abbreviated Journal Chronobiol Int  
  Volume 35 Issue 10 Pages 1456-1463  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract Disruptions to the circadian rhythm can lead to altered metabolism. Modification of thyroid function may be a reason why circadian misalignment may contribute to future metabolic disorders. We investigated whether circadian disruption through constant light (LL) can lead to variations in hormone levels associated with thyroid function. Mice were exposed to LL or a 12:12 Light:Dark (LD) cycle for 6 weeks; then glucose tolerance and thyroid hormone levels were measured at ZT 6 and ZT 18. There was day/night variation in glucose tolerance, but LL had no effect. LL reduced TSH, increased fT4, and abolished day/night variation in fT3 and leptin. These findings illustrate that LL alters thyroid-related hormones, providing evidence of a link between circadian disruption and thyroid function.  
  Address a Department of Biological Sciences , Bridgewater State University , Bridgewater , MA , USA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0742-0528 ISBN Medium (up)  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:29953263 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1958  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Miller, S.D.; Straka III, W.C.; Yue, J.; Seaman, C.J.; Xu, S.; Elvidge, C.D.; Hoffmann, L.; Azeem, I. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The Dark Side of Hurricane Matthew: Unique Perspectives from the VIIRS Day/Night Band Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society Abbreviated Journal Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc.  
  Volume 99 Issue 12 Pages 2561-2574  
  Keywords remote sensing  
  Abstract Hurricane Matthew (28 Sep – 9 October 2016) was perhaps the most infamous storm of the 2016 Atlantic hurricane season, claiming over 600 lives and causing over $15 billion USD in damages across the central Caribbean and southeastern U.S. seaboard. Research surrounding Matthew and its many noteworthy meteorological characteristics (e.g., rapid intensification into the southernmost Category 5 hurricane in the Atlantic basin on record, strong lightning and sprite production, and unusual cloud morphology) is ongoing. Satellite remote sensing typically plays an important role in the forecasting and study of hurricanes, providing a top-down perspective on storms developing over the remote and inherently data sparse tropical oceans. In this regard, a relative newcomer among the suite of satellite observations useful for tropical cyclone monitoring and research is the Visible/Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Day/Night Band (DNB), a sensor flying onboard the NOAA/NASA Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (SNPP) satellite. Unlike conventional instruments, the DNB's sensitivity to extremely low levels of visible/near-infrared light offers new insight on storm properties and impacts. Here, we chronicle Matthew’s path of destruction and peer through the DNB’s looking glass of low-light visible observations, including lightning connected to sprite formation, modulation of the atmospheric nightglow by storm-generated gravity waves, and widespread power outages. Collected without moonlight, these examples showcase the wealth of unique information present in DNB nocturnal low-light observations without moonlight, and their potential to complement traditional satellite measurements of tropical storms worldwide.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0003-0007 ISBN Medium (up)  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1959  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Ahn, H.; Lee, S.; Jo, E. openurl 
  Title Assessment on Lighting Management Zones for Light pollution in Gwangju Metropolitan City Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication 한국태양에너지학회 학술대회논문집 Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords Lighting; Planning  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium (up)  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1960  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Rybnikova, N.; Stevens, R.G.; Gregorio, D.I.; Samociuk, H.; Portnov, B.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Kernel density analysis reveals a halo pattern of breast cancer incidence in Connecticut Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Spatial and Spatio-temporal Epidemiology Abbreviated Journal Spatial and Spatio-temporal Epidemiology  
  Volume 26 Issue Pages 143-151  
  Keywords Human Health; Remote Sensing  
  Abstract Breast cancer (BC) incidence rates in Connecticut are among the highest in the United States, and are unevenly distributed within the state. Our goal was to determine whether artificial light at night (ALAN) played a role. Using BC records obtained from the Connecticut Tumor Registry, we applied the double kernel density (DKD) estimator to produce a continuous relative risk surface of a disease throughout the State. A multi-variate analysis compared DKD and census track estimates with population density, fertility rate, percent of non-white population, population below poverty level, and ALAN levels. The analysis identified a “halo” geographic pattern of BC incidence, with the highest rates of the disease observed at distances 5-15 km from the state's major cities. The “halo” was of high-income communities, with high ALAN, located in suburban fringes of the state's main cities.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1877-5845 ISBN Medium (up)  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1961  
Permanent link to this record
Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print

Save Citations:
Export Records: