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Author Fonken, L.K.; Bedrosian, T.A.; Zhang, N.; Weil, Z.M.; DeVries, A.C.; Nelson, R.J.
Title Dim light at night impairs recovery from global cerebral ischemia Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Experimental Neurology Abbreviated Journal Exp Neurol
Volume 317 Issue Pages 100-109
Keywords Animals; mouse models; cerebral ischemia
Abstract Nighttime lighting is one of the great conveniences of modernization; however, there is mounting evidence that inopportune light exposure can disrupt physiological and behavioral functions. Hospital patients may be particularly vulnerable to the consequences of light at night due to their compromised physiological state. Cardiac arrest/cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CA) was used to test the hypothesis in mice that exposure to dim light at night impairs central nervous system (CNS) recovery from a major pathological insult. Mice exposed to dim light at night (5lx) had higher mortality in the week following cardiac arrest compared to mice housed in dark nights (0lx). Neuronal damage was significantly greater in surviving mice exposed to dim light at night after CA versus those housed in dark nights. Dim light at night may have elevated neuronal damage by amplifying pro-inflammatory pathways in the CNS; Iba1 immunoreactivity (an indication of microglia activation) and pro-inflammatory cytokine expression were elevated in mice exposed to dim light at night post-CA. Furthermore, selective inhibition of IL-1beta or TNFalpha ameliorated damage in mice exposed to dim light at night. The effects of light at night on CA outcomes were also prevented by using a wavelength of nighttime light that has minimal impact on the endogenous circadian clock, suggesting that replacing broad-spectrum nighttime light with specific circadian-inert wavelengths could be protective. Together, these data indicate that exposure to dim light at night after global cerebral ischemia increases neuroinflammation, in turn exacerbating neurological damage and potential for mortality.
Address Department of Neuroscience, Wexner Medical Center, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210, USA
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0014-4886 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes (down) PMID:30822422 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2235
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Author Nagare, R.; Rea, M.S.; Plitnick, B.; Figueiro, M.G.
Title Effect of White Light Devoid of “Cyan” Spectrum Radiation on Nighttime Melatonin Suppression Over a 1-h Exposure Duration Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Journal of Biological Rhythms Abbreviated Journal J Biol Rhythms
Volume 34 Issue 2 Pages 195-204
Keywords Human Health; melatonin; melatonin suppression; cyan light
Abstract The intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells are the main conduit of the light signal emanating from the retina to the biological clock located in the suprachiasmatic nuclei of the hypothalamus. Lighting manufacturers are developing white light sources that are devoid of wavelengths around 480 nm (“cyan gap”) to reduce their impact on the circadian system. The present study was designed to investigate whether exposure to a “cyan-gap,” 3000 K white light source, spectrally tuned to reduce radiant power between 475 and 495 nm (reducing stimulation of the melanopsin-containing photoreceptor), would suppress melatonin less than a conventional 3000 K light source. The study's 2 phases employed a within-subjects experimental design involving the same 16 adult participants. In Phase 1, participants were exposed for 1 h to 3 experimental conditions over the course of 3 consecutive weeks: 1) dim light control (<5 lux at the eyes); 2) 800 lux at the eyes of a 3000 K light source; and 3) 800 lux at the eyes of a 3000 K, “cyan-gap” modified (3000 K mod) light source. The same protocol was repeated in Phase 2, but light levels were reduced to 400 lux at the eyes. As hypothesized, there were significant main effects of light level ( F1,12 = 9.1, p < 0.05, etap(2) = 0.43) and exposure duration ( F1,12 = 47.7, p < 0.05, etap(2) = 0.80) but there was no significant main effect of spectrum ( F1,12 = 0.16, p > 0.05, etap(2) = 0.01). There were no significant interactions with spectrum. Contrary to our model predictions, our results showed that short-term exposures (</= 1 h) to “cyan-gap” light sources suppressed melatonin similarly to conventional light sources of the same CCT and photopic illuminance at the eyes.
Address Lighting Research Center, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY, USA
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0748-7304 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes (down) PMID:30821188 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2240
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Author Zhang, K.; Zhong, X.; Zhang, G.; Li, D.; Su, Z.; Meng, Y.; Jiang, Y.
Title Thermal Stability Optimization of the Luojia 1-01 Nighttime Light Remote-Sensing Camera's Principal Distance Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Sensors (Basel, Switzerland) Abbreviated Journal Sensors (Basel)
Volume 19 Issue 5 Pages 990
Keywords Instrumentation; Luojia 1-01; nighttime light remote-sensing camera; principal distance; optical-passive athermal design; thermal stability
Abstract The instability of the principal distance of the nighttime light remote-sensing camera of the Luojia 1-01 satellite directly affects the geometric accuracy of images, consequently affecting the results of analysis of nighttime light remote-sensing data. Based on the theory of optical passive athermal design, a mathematical model of optical-passive athermal design for principal distance stabilization is established. Positive and negative lenses of different materials and the mechanical structures of different materials are matched to optimize the optical system. According to the index requirements of the Luojia 1-01 camera, an image-telecentric optical system was designed under the guidance of the established mathematical model. In the temperature range of -20 degrees C to +60 degrees C, the principal distance of the system changes from -0.01 mum to +0.28 mum. After on-orbit testing, the geometric accuracy of the designed nighttime light remote-sensing camera is better than 0.20 pixels and less than index requirement of 0.3 pixels, which indicating that the principal distance maintains good stability on-orbit and meets the application requirements of nighttime light remote sensing.
Address School of Remote Sensing and Information Engineering, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430079, China. jiangyh@whu.edu.cn
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1424-8220 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes (down) PMID:30813556 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2238
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Author Nagare, R.; Rea, M.S.; Plitnick, B.; Figueiro, M.G.
Title Nocturnal Melatonin Suppression by Adolescents and Adults for Different Levels, Spectra, and Durations of Light Exposure Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Journal of Biological Rhythms Abbreviated Journal J Biol Rhythms
Volume 34 Issue 2 Pages 178–194
Keywords Human Health; Physiology; Melatonin; melatonin suppression; Circadian Rhythm; circadian sensitivity
Abstract The human circadian system is primarily regulated by the 24-h LD cycle incident on the retina, and nocturnal melatonin suppression is a primary outcome measure for characterizing the biological clock's response to those light exposures. A limited amount of data related to the combined effects of light level, spectrum, and exposure duration on nocturnal melatonin suppression has impeded the development of circadian-effective lighting recommendations and light-treatment methods. The study's primary goal was to measure nocturnal melatonin suppression for a wide range of light levels (40 to 1000 lux), 2 white light spectra (2700 K and 6500 K), and an extended range of nighttime light exposure durations (0.5 to 3.0 h). The study's second purpose was to examine whether differences existed between adolescents' and adults' circadian sensitivity to these lighting characteristics. The third purpose was to provide an estimate of the absolute threshold for the impact of light on acute melatonin suppression. Eighteen adolescents (age range, 13 to 18 years) and 23 adults (age range, 24 to 55 years) participated in the study. Results showed significant main effects of light level, spectrum, and exposure duration on melatonin suppression. Moreover, the data also showed that the relative suppressing effect of light on melatonin diminishes with increasing exposure duration for both age groups and both spectra. The present results do not corroborate our hypothesis that adolescents exhibit greater circadian sensitivity to short-wavelength radiation compared with adults. As for threshold, it takes longer to observe significant melatonin suppression at lower CS levels than at higher CS levels. Dose-response curves (amount and duration) for both white-light spectra and both age groups can guide lighting recommendations when considering circadian-effective light in applications such as offices, schools, residences, and healthcare facilities.
Address Lighting Research Center, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY, USA
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0748-7304 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes (down) PMID:30803301 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2237
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Author Marinac, C.R.; Quante, M.; Mariani, S.; Weng, J.; Redline, S.; Cespedes Feliciano, E.M.; Hipp, J.A.; Wang, D.; Kaplan, E.R.; James, P.; Mitchell, J.A.
Title Associations Between Timing of Meals, Physical Activity, Light Exposure, and Sleep With Body Mass Index in Free-Living Adults Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Journal of Physical Activity & Health Abbreviated Journal J Phys Act Health
Volume 16 Issue 3 Pages 214-221
Keywords Human Health
Abstract BACKGROUND: This study tested if the timing of meals, physical activity, light exposure, and sleep cluster within individuals and are associated with body mass index (BMI) in a sample of free-living adults (N = 125). METHODS: Data were collected between November 2015 and March 2016 at the University of California, San Diego, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, and Washington University in St Louis. Height and weight were measured, and BMI (kg/m(2)) was calculated. Sleep timing was estimated using actigraphy, and timing of meals, physical activity, and light exposure were self-reported using a smartphone application. General linear models estimated the mean BMI across time categories of behaviors, adjusting for covariates. A latent class analysis was used to identify patterns of timing variables that clustered within individuals and test for associations between identified patterns and BMI. RESULTS: Later exposure to outdoor light was associated with a lower BMI (P trend < .01). The timing of other behaviors was not independently associated with BMI. The latent class analysis identified 2 distinct groups related to behavioral timing, reflecting an “early bird” and “night owl” phenotype. These phenotypes were not associated with BMI (P > .05). CONCLUSION: Timing of exposures to light, meals, sleep, and physical activity were not strongly associated with BMI in this sample.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1543-3080 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes (down) PMID:30798690 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2241
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