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Author Young, L. C., VanderWerf, E. A., McKown M., Roberts, P., Schlueter, J., Vorsino, A., & Sischo, D.
Title Evidence of Newell’s Shearwaters and Hawaiian Petrels on Oahu, Hawaii Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication (down) The Condor: Ornithological Applications Abbreviated Journal Condor
Volume 121 Issue 1 Pages 1-7
Keywords Animals; Remote Sensing
Abstract Hawaii’s only 2 endemic seabirds, Newell’s Shearwater (Puffinus auricularis newelli) and Hawaiian Petrel (Pterodroma sandwichensis), are listed under the United States Endangered Species Act. Threats to both species include light attraction and fallout, collisions with power lines and other structures, predation by invasive animals, and habitat degradation. Both species were assumed to be extirpated from the island of Oahu despite limited survey effort. We used survey data from Kauai (both species) and Maui (Hawaiian Petrel only) to model suitable habitat and light conditions. We then projected this model onto Oahu to identify potential survey sites. From April to September of 2016–2017, we deployed automated acoustic recording units at 13 potentially suitable sites across Oahu. We detected Newell’s Shearwaters at 2 sites; one on the leeward slopes of Mount Kaala in the Waianae Mountains and another at Poamoho in the Koolau Mountains. We detected Hawaiian Petrels at one location on the windward slope of Mount Kaala. All 3 sites were in nearly intact native forest with steep slopes. The frequency of detections at these sites suggests that both species are regularly prospecting on Oahu and potentially could be breeding there. If they are breeding, these individuals could represent missing links in the population connectivity of both species among islands. Protecting any remnant breeding populations would be of high conservation value given their recent population declines.
Address Pacific Rim Conservation, Honolulu, Hawaii, USA
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Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2308
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Author Dwyer, J. F., Pandey, A. K., McHale, L. A., & Harness, R. E.
Title Near-ultraviolet light reduced Sandhill Crane collisions with a power line by 98% Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication (down) The Condor: Ornithological Applications Abbreviated Journal Condor
Volume 121 Issue 2 Pages duz008
Keywords Animals; Birds; Sandhill Cranes; Antigone canadensis; power lines; collisions; Avian Collision Avoidance System; ACAS
Abstract Midflight collisions with power lines impact 12 of the world’s 15 crane species, including 1 critically endangered species, 3 endangered species, and 5 vulnerable species. Power lines can be fitted with line markers to increase the visibility of wires to reduce collisions, but collisions can persist on marked power lines. For example, hundreds of Sandhill Cranes (Antigone canadensis) die annually in collisions with marked power lines at the Iain Nicolson Audubon Center at Rowe Sanctuary (Rowe), a major migratory stopover location near Gibbon, Nebraska. Mitigation success has been limited because most collisions occur nocturnally when line markers are least visible, even though roughly half the line markers present include glow-in-the-dark stickers. To evaluate an alternative mitigation strategy at Rowe, we used a randomized design to test collision mitigation effects of a pole-mounted near-ultraviolet light (UV-A; 380–395 nm) Avian Collision Avoidance System (ACAS) to illuminate a 258-m power line span crossing the Central Platte River. We observed 48 Sandhill Crane collisions and 217 dangerous flights of Sandhill Crane flocks during 19 nights when the ACAS was off, but just 1 collision and 39 dangerous flights during 19 nights when the ACAS was on. Thus, we documented a 98% decrease in collisions and an 82% decrease in dangerous flights when the ACAS was on. We also found a 32% decrease in the number of evasive maneuvers initiated within 25 m of the power line along the river, and a 71% increase in the number of evasive maneuvers initiated beyond 25 m when the ACAS was on. Sandhill Cranes reacted sooner and with more control, and experienced substantially fewer collisions, when the ACAS was on. Installation of the ACAS on other high-risk spans, and perhaps on other anthropogenic obstacles where birds collide, may offer a new solution to a long-running conservation dilemma.
Address EDM International, Fort Collins, Colorado, USA; jdwyer(at)edmlink.com
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Publisher Oxford Academic Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
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Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2473
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Author Cottam, C.
Title A shower of grebes Type Journal Article
Year 1929 Publication (down) The Condor Abbreviated Journal
Volume 31 Issue 1 Pages 80-81
Keywords Animals; Birds
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Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2424
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Author Squires, W.A.; Hanson, H.E.
Title The destruction of birds at the lighthouses on the coast of California Type Journal Article
Year 1918 Publication (down) The Condor Abbreviated Journal
Volume 20 Issue 1 Pages 6-10
Keywords Animals
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Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2425
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Author Zhao, X.; Zhang M.; Che, X.; Zou, F.
Title Blue light attracts nocturnally migrating birds Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication (down) The Condor Abbreviated Journal
Volume in press Issue Pages in press
Keywords Animals
Abstract Light pollution is increasing and artificial light sources have great impacts on animals. For migrating birds, collisions caused by artificial light pollution are a significant source of mortality. Laboratory studies have demonstrated that birds have different visual sensitivities to different colors of light, but few field experiments have compared birds’ responses to light of different wavelengths. We used 3 monochromatic lights (red, green, and blue) and polychromatic yellow light to study the impact of wavelength on phototaxis at 2 gathering sites of nocturnally migrating birds in Southwest China. For both sites, short-wavelength blue light caused the strongest phototactic response. In contrast, birds were rarely attracted to long-wavelength red light. The attractive effect of blue light was greatest during nights with fog and headwinds. As rapid urbanization and industrialization cause an increase in artificial light, we suggest that switching to longer wavelength lights is a convenient and economically effective way to reduce bird collisions.

摘要

目前地球上光污染日益严重,五颜六色的人工光源对生态系统造成了很大影响。就鸟类而言,在世界各地已发生了很多鸟类撞击人工光源的事件。实验室研究表明,鸟类对不同颜色的光有不同的视觉敏感度,但很少有野外实验比较鸟类对不同波长光的反应。我们在中国西南地区的两个夜间候鸟迁徙聚集点使用三种单色光(红、绿、蓝)和一种复合光(黄),研究了光波长对的候鸟趋光性的影响。研究表明,短波长的蓝光引起了候鸟最强烈的趋光性反应。相反,鸟类很少被长波长的红光所吸引。特别是在有雾和逆风的夜晚,蓝光的吸引力最大。由于快速的城市化和工业化导致人造光的增加,我们认为使用长波光是一个减少鸟类碰撞光源的方便和经济有效的方式。
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Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2896
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