|   | 
Details
   web
Records
Author Rumanova, V.S.; Okuliarova, M.; Molcan, L.; Sutovska, H.; Zeman, M.
Title Consequences of low-intensity light at night on cardiovascular and metabolic parameters in spontaneously hypertensive rats Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication (up) Canadian Journal of Physiology and Pharmacology Abbreviated Journal Can J Physiol Pharmacol
Volume 97 Issue 9 Pages 863-871
Keywords Animals; mouse models
Abstract Circadian rhythms are an inherent property of physiological processes and can be disturbed by irregular environmental cycles, including artificial light at night (ALAN). Circadian disruption may contribute to many pathologies, such as hypertension, obesity and type 2 diabetes, but the underlying mechanisms are not understood. Our study investigated the consequences of ALAN on cardiovascular and metabolic parameters in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR), which represent an animal model of essential hypertension and insulin resistance. Adult males were exposed to a light (L)/dark (D) cycle of 12:12 h and the ALAN group experienced dim light at night (1-2 lux), either for 2 or 5 weeks. Rats on ALAN showed a loss of LD variability for systolic blood pressure (SysBP), but not for heart rate. Moreover, a gradual increase of SysBP was recorded over 5 weeks of ALAN. Exposure to ALAN increased plasma insulin and hepatic triglyceride levels. An increased expression of metabolic transcription factors, Pparalpha and Ppar, in the epididymal fat and a decreased expression of Glut4 in the heart was found in the ALAN group. Our results demonstrate that low-intensity ALAN can disturb BP control and augment insulin resistance in SHR, and may represent a serious risk factor for cardiometabolic diseases.
Address Faculty of Natural Sciences, Comenius University, Animal Physiology and Ethology , Ilkovicova 6 , Slovakia , Bratislava, Slovakia, Slovakia , 84215 ; mzeman@fns.uniba.sk
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0008-4212 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:31251886 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2567
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Rumanova, V.S.; Okuliarova, M.; Molcan, L.; Sutovska, H.; Zeman, M.
Title Consequences of low-intensity light at night on cardiovascular and metabolic parameters in spontaneously hypertensive rats (1) Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication (up) Canadian Journal of Physiology and Pharmacology Abbreviated Journal Can J Physiol Pharmacol
Volume 97 Issue 9 Pages 863-871
Keywords Animals; Ppar; blood pressure; circadian; circadien; insulin resistance; metabolism; metabolisme; recepteurs actives par les proliferateurs de peroxysomes; resistance a l'insuline; tension arterielle
Abstract Circadian rhythms are an inherent property of physiological processes and can be disturbed by irregular environmental cycles, including artificial light at night (ALAN). Circadian disruption may contribute to many pathologies, such as hypertension, obesity, and type 2 diabetes, but the underlying mechanisms are not understood. Our study investigated the consequences of ALAN on cardiovascular and metabolic parameters in spontaneously hypertensive rats, which represent an animal model of essential hypertension and insulin resistance. Adult males were exposed to a 12 h light – 12 h dark cycle and the ALAN group experienced dim light at night (1-2 lx), either for 2 or 5 weeks. Rats on ALAN showed a loss of light-dark variability for systolic blood pressure, but not for heart rate. Moreover, a gradual increase of systolic blood pressure was recorded over 5 weeks of ALAN. Exposure to ALAN increased plasma insulin and hepatic triglyceride levels. An increased expression of metabolic transcription factors, Pparalpha and Ppargamma, in the epididymal fat and a decreased expression of Glut4 in the heart was found in the ALAN group. Our results demonstrate that low-intensity ALAN can disturb blood pressure control and augment insulin resistance in spontaneously hypertensive rats, and may represent a serious risk factor for cardiometabolic diseases.
Address Department of Animal Physiology and Ethology, Faculty of Natural Sciences, Comenius University, Bratislava, Slovakia
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0008-4212 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:31251886 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2811
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Patel, J.S.; Radetsky, L.; Rea, M.S.
Title The Value of Red Light at Night for Increasing Basil Yield Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication (up) Canadian Journal of Plant Science Abbreviated Journal Can. J. Plant Sci.
Volume 98 Issue 6 Pages 1321-1330
Keywords Plants
Abstract Sweet basil (<i>Ocimum basilicum L.</i>) is primarily used for culinary purposes, but it is also used in the fragrance and medicinal industries. In the last few years, global sweet basil production has been significantly impacted by downy mildew caused by <i>Peronospora belbahrii</i>. Nighttime exposure to red light has been shown to inhibit sporulation of <i>P. belbahrii</i>. The objective of this study was to determine if nighttime exposure to red light from light-emitting diodes (LEDs; λ<sub>max</sub> = 625 nm) could increase plant growth (plant height and leaf size) and yield (number and weight of leaves) in basil plants. In two sets of greenhouse experiments, red light was applied at a photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD) of 60 µmol m<sup>-2</sup> s<sup>-1</sup> during the otherwise dark night for 10 hours (from 20:00 to 06:00). The results demonstrate that exposure to red light at night can increase the number of basil leaves per plant, plant height, leaf size (length and width), and leaf fresh and dry weight, compared to plants in darkness at night. The addition of incremental red light at night has the potential to be cost-effective for fresh organic basil production in controlled environments.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0008-4220 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1955
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Zubidat, A.E.; Fares, B.; Fares, F.; Haim, A.
Title Artificial Light at Night of Different Spectral Compositions Differentially Affects Tumor Growth in Mice: Interaction With Melatonin and Epigenetic Pathways Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication (up) Cancer Control : Journal of the Moffitt Cancer Center Abbreviated Journal Cancer Control
Volume 25 Issue 1 Pages 1073274818812908
Keywords Human Health; 6-Smt; Cfl; EE-halogen; GDM-levels; body mass; carbon; corticosterone; cosinor analysis; light at night; yellow-LED
Abstract Lighting technology is rapidly advancing toward shorter wavelength illuminations that offer energy-efficient properties. Along with this advantage, the increased use of such illuminations also poses some health challenges, particularly breast cancer progression. Here, we evaluated the effects of artificial light at night (ALAN) of 4 different spectral compositions (500-595 nm) at 350 Lux on melatonin suppression by measuring its urine metabolite 6-sulfatoxymelatonin, global DNA methylation, tumor growth, metastases formation, and urinary corticosterone levels in 4T1 breast cancer cell-inoculated female BALB/c mice. The results revealed an inverse dose-dependent relationship between wavelength and melatonin suppression. Short wavelength increased tumor growth, promoted lung metastases formation, and advanced DNA hypomethylation, while long wavelength lessened these effects. Melatonin treatment counteracted these effects and resulted in reduced cancer burden. The wavelength suppression threshold for melatonin-induced tumor growth was 500 nm. These results suggest that short wavelength increases cancer burden by inducing aberrant DNA methylation mediated by the suppression of melatonin. Additionally, melatonin suppression and global DNA methylation are suggested as promising biomarkers for early diagnosis and therapy of breast cancer. Finally, ALAN may manifest other physiological responses such as stress responses that may challenge the survival fitness of the animal under natural environments.
Address 1 The Israeli Center for Interdisciplinary Research in Chronobiology, University of Haifa, Haifa, Israel
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher SAGE Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1073-2748 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:30477310; PMCID:PMC6259078 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 2143
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Leung, L.; Grundy, A.; Siemiatycki, J.; Arseneau, J.; Gilbert, L.; Gotlieb, W.H.; Provencher, D.M.; Aronson, K.J.; Koushik, A.
Title Shift Work Patterns, Chronotype, and Epithelial Ovarian Cancer Risk Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication (up) Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention : a Publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, Cosponsored by the American Society of Preventive Oncology Abbreviated Journal Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev
Volume in press Issue Pages 1055-9965.EPI-18-1112
Keywords Human Health; chronotype; Cancer; epithelial ovarian cancer; Ovarian cancer
Abstract BACKGROUND: Shift work causing circadian disruption is classified as a 'probable carcinogen' and may contribute to the pathogenesis of hormone-sensitive cancers. This study investigated shift work exposure in relation to epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) risk. METHODS: In a population-based case-control study with 496 EOC cases and 906 controls, lifetime occupational histories were collected and used to calculate cumulative years of shift work exposure, average number of night shifts per month, and average number of consecutive night shifts per month. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for associations with EOC risk were estimated using logistic regression. Associations were also examined according to chronotype and menopausal status. RESULTS: Over half of the cases (53.4%) and controls (51.7%) worked evening and/or night shifts. There was no clear pattern of increasing EOC risk with increasing years of shift work; the adjusted OR (95%CI) of EOC comparing the highest shift work category vs. never working shift work was 1.20 (0.89-1.63). This association was more pronounced among those self-identified as having a “morning” chronotype (OR=1.64, 95%CI: 1.01-2.65). Associations did not greatly differ by menopausal status. CONCLUSION: These results do not strongly demonstrate a relationship between shift work and EOC risk. IMPACT: This study collected detailed shift work information and examined shift work patterns according to shift times and schedules. The findings highlight that chronotype should be considered in studies of shift work as an exposure.
Address Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Universite de Montreal; Department of Social and Preventive Medicine
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1055-9965 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:30842128 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2261
Permanent link to this record