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Author Leung, L.; Grundy, A.; Siemiatycki, J.; Arseneau, J.; Gilbert, L.; Gotlieb, W.H.; Provencher, D.M.; Aronson, K.J.; Koushik, A.
Title Shift Work Patterns, Chronotype, and Epithelial Ovarian Cancer Risk Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication (up) Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention : a Publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, Cosponsored by the American Society of Preventive Oncology Abbreviated Journal Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev
Volume in press Issue Pages 1055-9965.EPI-18-1112
Keywords Human Health; chronotype; Cancer; epithelial ovarian cancer; Ovarian cancer
Abstract BACKGROUND: Shift work causing circadian disruption is classified as a 'probable carcinogen' and may contribute to the pathogenesis of hormone-sensitive cancers. This study investigated shift work exposure in relation to epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) risk. METHODS: In a population-based case-control study with 496 EOC cases and 906 controls, lifetime occupational histories were collected and used to calculate cumulative years of shift work exposure, average number of night shifts per month, and average number of consecutive night shifts per month. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for associations with EOC risk were estimated using logistic regression. Associations were also examined according to chronotype and menopausal status. RESULTS: Over half of the cases (53.4%) and controls (51.7%) worked evening and/or night shifts. There was no clear pattern of increasing EOC risk with increasing years of shift work; the adjusted OR (95%CI) of EOC comparing the highest shift work category vs. never working shift work was 1.20 (0.89-1.63). This association was more pronounced among those self-identified as having a “morning” chronotype (OR=1.64, 95%CI: 1.01-2.65). Associations did not greatly differ by menopausal status. CONCLUSION: These results do not strongly demonstrate a relationship between shift work and EOC risk. IMPACT: This study collected detailed shift work information and examined shift work patterns according to shift times and schedules. The findings highlight that chronotype should be considered in studies of shift work as an exposure.
Address Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Universite de Montreal; Department of Social and Preventive Medicine
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ISSN 1055-9965 ISBN Medium
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Notes PMID:30842128 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2261
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Author Welz, P.-S.; Zinna, V.M.; Symeonidi, A.; Koronowski, K.B.; Kinouchi, K.; Smith, J.G.; Guillen, I.M.; Castellanos, A.; Crainiciuc, G.; Prats, N.; Caballero, J.M.; Hidalgo, A.; Sassone-Corsi, P.; Benitah, S.A.
Title BMAL1-Driven Tissue Clocks Respond Independently to Light to Maintain Homeostasis Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication (up) Cell Abbreviated Journal Cell
Volume 177 Issue 6 Pages 1436-1447.e12
Keywords Animals
Abstract Circadian rhythms control organismal physiology throughout the day. At the cellular level, clock regulation is established by a self-sustained Bmal1-dependent transcriptional oscillator network. However, it is still unclear how different tissues achieve a synchronized rhythmic physiology. That is, do they respond independently to environmental signals, or require interactions with each other to do so? We show that unexpectedly, light synchronizes the Bmal1-dependent circadian machinery in single tissues in the absence of Bmal1 in all other tissues. Strikingly, light-driven tissue autonomous clocks occur without rhythmic feeding behavior and are lost in constant darkness. Importantly, tissue-autonomous Bmal1 partially sustains homeostasis in otherwise arrhythmic and prematurely aging animals. Our results therefore support a two-branched model for the daily synchronization of tissues: an autonomous response branch, whereby light entrains circadian clocks without any commitment of other Bmal1-dependent clocks, and a memory branch using other Bmal1-dependent clocks to “remember” time in the absence of external cues.
Address Institute for Research in Biomedicine (IRB Barcelona), Barcelona Institute of Science and Technology, 08028 Barcelona, Spain; ICREA, Catalan Institution for Research and Advanced Studies, 08010 Barcelona, Spain. Electronic address: salvador.aznar-benitah@irbbarcelona.org
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ISSN 0092-8674 ISBN Medium
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Notes PMID:31150620 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2513
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Author Bapary, M.A.J.; Takano, J.-I.; Soma, S.; Sankai, T.
Title Effect of blue LED light and antioxidants potential in a somatic cell Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication (up) Cell Biology International Abbreviated Journal Cell Biol Int
Volume 43 Issue 11 Pages 1296-1306
Keywords Cells; Biology; LED; blue light; Antioxidants; cell death
Abstract Light is an indispensable part of routine laboratory works in which conventional light is generally used. Light-emitting diodes (LEDs) have come to replace the conventional light thus could be a potent target in biomedical studies. Since blue light is a major component of visible light wavelength, in this study, using a somatic cell from African green monkey kidney, we assessed the possible consequences of blue spectra of LED light in future animal experiments and proposed a potent mitigation against light induced damages. COS-7 cells were exposed to blue LED light (450 nm) and the growth and DNA damage were assessed at different exposure times. A higher suppression in cell growth and viability was observed under a longer period of blue LED light exposure. The number of apoptotic cells increased as light exposure time was prolonged. Reactive oxygen species generation was also elevated in accordance to the extension of light exposure times. A comparison to dark-maintained cells revealed that the upregulation of ROS by blue LED light plays a significant role in causing cellular dysfunction in DNA in a time-dependent manner. In turn, antioxidant treatment has shown to improve the cell growth and viability under blue LED light conditions. This indicates that antioxidants are potential against blue LED light-induced somatic cell damage. It is expected that this study will contribute to the understanding of the basic mechanism of somatic cell death under visible light and to maximize the beneficial use of LED light in future animal experiments.
Address Tsukuba Primate Research Center, National Institutes of Biomedical Innovation, Health and Nutrition, Ibaraki, Japan
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Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
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ISSN 1065-6995 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:30958611 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2328
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Author Mascovich, K. A., Larson, L. R., & Andrews, K. M.
Title Lights On, or Lights Off? Hotel Guests' Response to Nonpersonal Educational Outreach Designed to Protect Nesting Sea Turtles Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication (up) Chelonian Conservation and Biology Abbreviated Journal
Volume 17 Issue 2 Pages 206-215
Keywords Education; Psychology
Abstract Light pollution from beachfront hotels has the potential to impact nesting and hatching sea turtles. Education strategies could be used to alter visitor behavior and mitigate this threat. We tested the efficacy of a sea turtle–friendly education card that encouraged visitors to “protect the night, hide the light.” Cards were placed in beachfront hotel rooms at a prominent sea turtle nesting site: Jekyll Island, Georgia. We assessed visitor responses by conducting nightly observations to determine the proportion of occupied guest rooms with beach-visible lights under 2 different scenarios (cards present or cards absent). We found that less than half of all hotel guests closed room blinds to minimize artificial light on the nesting beach, and compliance rates seemed to be lower during peak visitation times. The nonpersonal educational treatment (card) had little effect on visitors' sea turtle–friendly lighting choices and behaviors, highlighting the need for other approaches to encourage responsible tourist behavior at ecologically sensitive beach destinations.
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Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2316
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Author Wei, Y., Chen, Z., Xiu, C., Yu, B., & Liu, H.
Title Siting of Dark Sky Reserves in China Based on Multi-source Spatial Data and Multiple Criteria Evaluation Method Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication (up) Chinese Geographical Science Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages 1-13
Keywords Conservation; Skyglow; Remote Sensing
Abstract With the rapid development of population and urbanization and the progress of lighting technology, the influence of artificial light sources has increased. In this context, the problem of light pollution has attracted wide attention. Previous studies have revealed that light pollution can affect biological living environments, human physical and mental health, astronomical observations and many other aspects. Therefore, organizations internationally have begun to advocate for measures to prevent light pollution, many of which are recognized by the International Dark-Sky Association (IDA). In addition to improving public awareness, legal protections, technical treatments and other means, the construction of Dark Sky Reserves (DSR) has proven to be an effective preventive measure. So far, as a pioneer practice in this field, the IDA has identified 11 DSRs worldwide. Based on the DA requirements for DSRs, this paper utilizes NPP-VIIRS nighttime light data and other multi-source spatial data to analyze possible DSR sites in China. The land of China was divided into more than ten thousand 30 km × 30 km fishnets, and constraint and suitable conditions were designated, respectively, as light and cloud conditions, and scale, traffic and attractiveness conditions. Using a multiple criteria evaluation, 1443 fishnets were finally selected as most suitable sites for the construction of DSRs. Results found that less than 25% of China is not subject to light pollution, and less than 13% is suitable for DSR construction, primarily in western and northern areas, including Tibet, Xinjiang, Qinghai, Gansu and Inner Mongolia.
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Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2724
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