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Author Owens, A. C. S., Cochard, P., Durrant, J., Farnworth, B., Perkin, E. K., &Seymoure, B.
Title Light Pollution Is a Driver of Insect Declines Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication (up) Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords Ecology; Animals
Abstract Insects around the world are rapidly declining. Concerns over what this loss means for food security and ecological communities have compelled a growing number of researchers to search for the key drivers behind the decline. Habitat loss, pesticide use, invasive species, and climate change all have likely played a role, but we posit here that artificial light at night (ALAN) is another important — but often overlooked — bringer of the insect apocalypse. We first discuss the history and extent of ALAN, and then present evidence that ALAN has led to insect declines through its interference with the development, movement, foraging, and reproductive success of diverse insect species, as well as its positive effect on insectivore predation. We conclude with a discussion of how artificial lights can be tuned to reduce their impacts on vulnerable populations. ALAN is unique among anthropogenic habitat disturbances in that it is fairly easy to ameliorate, and leaves behind no residual effects. Greater recognition of the ways in which ALAN impacts insects can help conservationists reduce or eliminate one of the major drivers of insect declines.
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Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2649
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Author Laze, K.
Title Assessing Public Perceptions about Road Lighting in five Neighborhoods of Tirana, Albania Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication (up) Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords Psychology
Abstract Lighting is essential for sight, human health and well-being, emerging the need for assessing exterior lighting to better understand how far public is satisfied about exterior lighting. Exterior lighting was assessed in five major roads of the capital city of Tirana, Albania, in November 2017. Security, obstacle detection and visibility were evaluated using questionnaires for road lighting. The approximately 87 and 60 percent of respondents, respectively, were not able to detect a pavement obstacle after-dark and to distinguish a

familiar face at a distance of 5 m and 10 m along roads. Road lighting after-dark was unsatisfactory to 60 percent of respondents. These findings identified road lighting could be inadequate for users, requiring further investigation and new data collection of road lighting in neighborhoods of Tirana.
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Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2651
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Author Stock, D. M.
Title LOCALIZED LIGHT SENSORY IN RELATION TO GRAZING ACTIVITY OF ECHINOMETRA MATHAEI Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication (up) Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords Animals
Abstract This paper offers insight on the regulation of nocturnal behavior in burrowing sea urchin Echinometra mathaei of the Pacific. While it is known E. mathaei maintains nocturnal hours of activity (primarily grazing, burrowing, and locomotion), it is unknown whether this pattern follows a circadian rhythm or responds to local conditions of darkness. Varying light treatments were tested to determine potential manipulation of active behavior and explore potential for habitat destruction. Light manipulation was used to determine the role light sensory plays in the regulation of normal behavior. First utilizing gradual manipulation and later utilizing sudden manipulation to differentiate response to light stimuli. It was determined that while E. mathaei maintains nocturnal

activity via localized light sensory, manipulation of latent hours could not be significantly reproduced. It was found that while light manipulation can be responsible for simulating hours of activity, light manipulation cannot replicate latent hours. Upon exploration of predator response capability in E. mathaei following manipulation, it was found that individuals exposed to prolonged periods of artificial light had slower predation response times than individuals acclimated to a regular pattern of light exposure. These findings connect potential habitat degradation via grazing behaviors of E. mathaei to anthropogenic activity in Mo’orea, French Polynesia.
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Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2653
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Author Kersavage, K.; Skinner, N.P.; Bullough, J.D.; Garvey, P.M.; Donnell, E.T.; Rea, M.S.
Title Investigation of flashing and intensity characteristics for vehicle-mounted warning beacons Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication (up) Accident Analysis & Prevention Abbreviated Journal Accident Analysis & Prevention
Volume 119 Issue Pages 23-28
Keywords Security; Public Safety; Lighting
Abstract Reducing the potential for crashes involving front line service workers and passing vehicles is important for increasing worker safety in work zones and similar locations. Flashing yellow warning beacons are often used to protect, delineate, and provide visual information to drivers within and approaching work zones. A nighttime field study using simulated workers, with and without reflective vests, present outside trucks was conducted to evaluate the effects of different warning beacon intensities and flash frequencies. Interactions between intensity and flash frequency were also analyzed. This study determined that intensitiesof 25/2.5 cd and 150/15 cd (peak/trough intensity) provided the farthest detection distances of the simulated worker. Mean detection distances in response to a flash frequency of 1 Hz were not statistically different from those in response to 4 Hz flashing. Simulated workers wearing reflective vests were seen the farthest distances away from the trucks for all combinations of intensity and flash frequency.
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ISSN 0001-4575 ISBN Medium
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Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1950
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Author Sullivan, J.M.; Flannagan, M.J.
Title The role of ambient light level in fatal crashes: inferences from daylight saving time transitions Type Journal Article
Year 2002 Publication (up) Accident Analysis & Prevention Abbreviated Journal Accident Analysis & Prevention
Volume 34 Issue 4 Pages 487-498
Keywords Public Safety; Lighting
Abstract The purpose of this study was to estimate the size of the influence of ambient light level on fatal pedestrian and vehicle crashes in three scenarios. The scenarios were: fatal pedestrian crashes at intersections, fatal pedestrian crashes on dark rural roads, and fatal single-vehicle run-off-road crashes on dark, curved roads. Each scenario's sensitivity to light level was evaluated by comparing the number of fatal crashes across changes to and from daylight saving time, within daily time periods in which an abrupt change in light level occurs relative to official clock time. The analyses included 11 years of fatal crashes in the United States, between 1987 and 1997. Scenarios involving pedestrians were most sensitive to light level, in some cases showing up to seven times more risk at night over daytime. In contrast, single-vehicle run-off-road crashes showed little difference between light and dark time periods, suggesting factors other than light level play the dominant role in these crashes. These results are discussed in the context of the possible safety improvements offered by new developments in adaptive vehicle headlighting.
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ISSN 0001-4575 ISBN Medium
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Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2126
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