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Author Wieduwilt, A.; Alsat, E.A.; Blickwedel, J.; Strizek, B.; Di Battista, C.; Lachner, A.B.; Plischke, H.; Melaku, T.; Muller, A.; Bagci, S.
Title Dramatically altered environmental lighting conditions in women with high-risk pregnancy during hospitalization Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication (up) Chronobiology International Abbreviated Journal Chronobiol Int
Volume in press Issue Pages
Keywords Lighting; Human Health; Pregnant women; circadian rhythm; color temperatures; hospital light environmental; illuminance; indoor
Abstract The maternal circadian time structure is incredibly important in the entrainment and programing of the fetal and newborn circadian time structure. Natural sunlight is the primary environmental time cue for entrainment of circadian rhythms, but high-risk pregnant women spend most of their time indoors with artificial light sources and extremely low levels of natural light both during the day and night. Because the daily level, timing, duration of light exposure and its spectral properties are important in maintaining the normal circadian physiology in humans, we aimed to evaluate the environmental lighting conditions in high-risk pregnant women admitted to hospital for long-term stay. About 30 patients were included in the study. Exposed illuminance, color temperature and effective circadian radiation dose were measured and recorded every 10 s by light dosimeters attached to the patients' clothing. We documented the illuminance of 29 pregnant women on 235 inpatient days. Median (IQR) measured illuminance was 70 (28-173) lux in the morning, 124 (63-241) lux in the afternoon, 19 (6-53) lux in the evening and 0 (0-0) lux at the night. Median illuminance for the 235 inpatient days of assessment was below the recommended EU standard of 100 lux-60.5% of the mornings and 42.7% of the afternoons. The women confined to indoor locations rarely achieved an illuminances more than 300 lux in the morning and in the afternoon. Compared to women with outdoor mobility, those confined indoors have a significantly lower illuminance and color temperature, both in the morning and in the afternoon. Our study presents the first information about the dramatically altered environmental lighting conditions experienced by high-risk pregnant women during their hospital stay. Their exposure to light while in the hospital is significantly lower than exposure to natural daylight levels and below the recommended EU standard.
Address Department of Neonatology and Pediatric Intensive Care Medicine, Children's Hospital, University of Bonn , Bonn, Germany
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0742-0528 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:32752886 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3061
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Author Verma, A.K.; Singh, S.; Rizvi, S.I.
Title Age-dependent altered redox homeostasis in the chronodisrupted rat model and moderation by melatonin administration Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication (up) Chronobiology International Abbreviated Journal Chronobiol Int
Volume in press Issue Pages
Keywords Animals; Aging; artificial light-at-night; circadian disruption; melatonin; oxidative stress
Abstract Circadian disruption or chronodisruption (CD) occurs when day-night cycles and other internal rhythms are not adjusted to environmental light-dark regimens and are unable to synchronize among each other. Artificial light-induced oxidative stress is a major concern as the circadian physiology of the cell is chronically altered due to suppression of the time-keeping hormone, melatonin. The relationship between age-related impaired redox status and disrupted circadian rhythms is still not fully understood. The present study evaluated the effect of artificial light at night (ALAN) with respect to aging and role of melatonin supplementation. This study was conducted on young (3 months) and old (24 months) male Wistar rats subdivided into four groups control (C), melatonin treated (MLT), artificial light at night (ALAN), and ALAN+MLT group. Pronounced changes were observed in the old compared to the young rats. Reactive oxygen species (ROS), malondialdehyde (MDA), plasma membrane redox system (PMRS), protein carbonyl (PCO), and sialic acid (SA) were significantly (p </= 0.05) increased, while ferric reducing ability of plasma (FRAP) and reduced glutathione (GSH) were significantly (p </= 0.05) suppressed in light-exposed young and old animals compared to their age-matched controls. Advanced oxidation protein products (AOPP) increased non-significantly in young rats of the ALAN group; however, significant (p </= 0.05) changes were observed in the old rats of the ALAN group compared to their respective controls. Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) increased and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity decreased, significantly (p </= 0.05) in young animals of the ALAN group, while nonsignificant changes of both parameters were recorded in the old animals of the ALAN groups compared with their age-matched controls. Melatonin supplementation resulted in maintenance of the normal redox homeostasis in both young and old animal groups. Our study suggests that aged rats are more susceptible to altered photoperiod as their circadian redox homeostasis is under stress subsequent to ALAN. Melatonin supplementation could be a promising means of alleviating age-related circadian disturbances, especially in light-polluted areas.
Address Department of Biochemistry, University of Allahabad , Allahabad, India
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0742-0528 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:32731777 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3067
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Author Matsumoto, S.-I.; Shirahashi, K.
Title Novel perspectives on the influence of the lunar cycle on the timing of full-term human births Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication (up) Chronobiology International Abbreviated Journal Chronobiol Int
Volume in press Issue Pages
Keywords Moonlight; Human birth; full moon; lunar cycle; new moon
Abstract It is claimed by some that the number of births occurring at the time of the full moon is greater than other phases of the lunar cycle; however, many publications fail to substantiate the claim leading to the conclusion it is myth. We tested using a novel approach the null hypotheses: (i) human birth is not lunar cycle-dependent and (ii) the number of births occurring at or around the time of the full moon is not different from the number occurring at the time of the other phases of the lunar cycle. We reviewed the birth records from 1 January 1996 to 16 March 2007 of the obstetric department of our hospital, which was then located in a relatively undeveloped area of Fukutsu city in Fukuoka Prefecture of southern Japan. A total of 1507 births satisfied all inclusion criteria, among others, being full-term and following spontaneously initiated labor. When the birth data were analyzed as done by other investigators, i.e. total number of births per lunar day, lunar phase was not found to be influential. However, more detailed analyses on the subset of babies born specifically during the nighttime hours (N = 362) revealed the number of births varied in relation specifically to the changing amount of moonlight during the nighttime at different stages of the lunar cycle, with highest number of births at or around the time of the full moon. In contrast, analyses on the subset of babies born specifically during the daytime hours (N = 377) revealed the number of births varied in relation specifically to the changing amount moonlight during the daytime at different stages of the lunar cycle, with the highest number of births at or around the time of the new moon. The initiation and culmination of human birth are typically a nocturnal process. The findings of this investigation are consistent with the hypothesis natural nighttime parturition is influenced by lunar phase, particularly the full moon, and, thus, they are consistent with the belief the moon exerts an affect upon the timing of human birth. We speculate the long-hold belief of the association between birth and lunar phase may be based on historical observations that in the absence of artificial light at night nocturnal births occurred in elevated number when the full moon brightly illuminated the nighttime sky.
Address Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Munakata Suikokai General Hospital , Fukutsu, Fukuoka Prefecture, Japan
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0742-0528 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:32703035 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3083
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Author Liu, Y.; Zhang, X.; Pan, X.; Ma, X.; Tang, M.
Title The spatial integration and coordinated industrial development of urban agglomerations in the Yangtze River Economic Belt, China Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication (up) Cities Abbreviated Journal Cities
Volume 104 Issue Pages 102801
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract Urban agglomeration is the engine of national development and regional prosperity. Although extensive work has investigated issues related to this new form of spatial governance, few studies have directly illustrated the spatial integration of urban agglomeration and its relationship with industrial development. This paper employs nighttime light data and industrial enterprise datasets to investigate the spatial integration and industrial development in the Yangtze River Economic Belt (YREB) of China for 1995–2015. We here illustrate the significant relationship between the spatial integration of urban agglomerations and the characteristics of industrial development. In the process of spatial integration, urban form, intercity relation and their evolution show clear regional differences. Because of the differences in socio-economic and geographical characteristics, urban systems are more advanced and closely related in developed areas. A significant negative (positive) spatial correlation between industrial specialization (diversification) and urban form is supported by using bivariate Moran's I, and spatial clustering patterns are clearly different across the three urban agglomerations. A panel regression reveals that intercity relations are significantly associated with the characteristics of industrial development. Higher levels of industrial diversification and competition are associated with weaker intercity relations, while industrial structures similarities are reversed. These findings could be used to formulate reasonable policies and plans and to support future regional spatial integration and coordinated development.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0264-2751 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2986
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Author Alzahrani, H.S.; Khuu, S.K.; Roy, M.
Title Modelling the effect of commercially available blue-blocking lenses on visual and non-visual functions Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication (up) Clinical & Experimental Optometry Abbreviated Journal Clin Exp Optom
Volume in press Issue Pages cxo.12959
Keywords Human Health; blue-blocking lenses; non-visual functions; transmittance; visual functions
Abstract BACKGROUND: Blue-blocking lenses (BBLs) are marketed as providing retinal protection from acute and cumulative exposure to blue light over time. The selective reduction in visible wavelengths transmitted through BBLs is known to influence the photosensitivity of retinal photoreceptors, which affects both visual and non-visual functions. This study measured the spectral transmittance of BBLs and evaluated their effect on blue perception, scotopic vision, circadian rhythm, and protection from photochemical retinal damage. METHODS: Seven different types of BBLs from six manufacturers and untinted control lenses with three different powers (+2.00 D, -2.00 D and Plano) were evaluated. The whiteness index of BBLs used in this study was calculated using Commission International de l'Eclairage (CIE) Standard Illuminates D65, and CIE 1964 Standard with a 2 degrees Observer. The protective qualities of BBLs and their effect on blue perception, scotopic vision, and circadian rhythm were evaluated based on their spectral transmittance, which was measured with a Cary 5,000 UV-Vis-NIR spectrophotometer. RESULTS: BBLs were found to reduce blue light (400-500 nm) by 6-43 per cent, providing significant protection from photochemical retinal damage compared to control lenses (p </= 0.05). All BBLs were capable of reducing the perception of blue colours, scotopic sensitivities and circadian sensitivities by 5-36 per cent, 5-24 per cent, and 4-27 per cent, respectively depending on the brand and power of the lens. CONCLUSION: BBLs can provide some protection to the human eye from photochemical retinal damage by reducing a portion of blue light that may affect visual and non-visual performances, such as those critical to scotopic vision, blue perception, and circadian rhythm.
Address School of Optometry and Vision Science, The University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0816-4622 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:31441122 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2654
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