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Author Pan, H.; Xu, Y.; Liang, G.; Wyckhuys, K.A.G.; Yang, Y.; Lu, Y.
Title Field evaluation of light-emitting diodes to trap the cotton bollworm, Helicoverpa armigera Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication (up) Crop Protection Abbreviated Journal Crop Protection
Volume in press Issue Pages
Keywords Animals
Abstract The cotton bollworm, Helicoverpa armigera (Hübner) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), is a limiting pest of many agricultural crops worldwide. At present, in-field populations of H. armigera are routinely monitored using conventional light traps. During 2014, 2015, we conducted field assays to assess the relative attractiveness of narrow-band light-emitting diodes (LEDs) at 19 single wavelengths (375–748 nm) in H. armigera light traps. Between 2016 and 2019, LEDs with the most attractive wavelengths were then further evaluated in two different sites, i.e., Xinxiang and Anci (China). During 2014–2015, the highest H. armigera trap capture was obtained with LEDs at 395 nm, while it was not significantly different from LED wavelengths of 375 nm and 418 nm in 2015. During field trials in Xinxiang, H. armigera trap capture did not differ among (four) wavelengths (375 nm, 385 nm, 395 nm, and 405 nm) in either year. In the Anci site, most H. armigera adults were caught in traps equipped with LEDs of 385 nm during two years, but it was not significantly different from those at 405 nm in 2017. In 2019, H. armigera trap capture rate was higher for LEDs at 385 nm than for those at 395 nm, and 2.91-fold higher to that of a commercial UV blacklight (365 ± 50 nm) trap. Our work shows how LED-equipped traps constitute an efficient, energy-conserving way to monitor cotton bollworm populations, providing trap capture rates that surpass those of conventional technologies. We discuss how these innovative measures can complement the integrated pest management (IPM) toolbox for H. armigera in China and abroad.
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Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0261-2194 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2984
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Author Lawrence, B.K.; Fehr, W.R.
Title Reproductive Response of Soybeans to Night Interruption1 Type Journal Article
Year 1981 Publication (up) Crop Science Abbreviated Journal
Volume 21 Issue 5 Pages 755
Keywords Plants
Abstract Artificial lights may be used to delay flowering of soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] cultivars. Previous research has suggested that night interruption imposed every other night would delay flowering as much as every-night interruption. Our objective was to evaluate the reproductive development of cultivars when exposed to night interruption every night compared with exposure every other night. One cultivar of each Maturity Group 00 through V was grown in the field at Ames, Iowa during 1978 and 1979. The four light treatments imposed every night or every other night included illumination with incandescent light from sunset to sunrise, 2300 to 0030 hours, 0030 to 0200 hours, or 0200 to 0330 hours. Control plots were not exposed to artificial light.

The average number of days that reproductive development was delayed beyond the control was twice as great for the every-night treatments as for the every-other-night treatments. Illumination from sunset to sunrise delayed reproductive development significantly more than the treatments of night interruption for 1.5 hours. Night interruption near the end of the dark period (0200 to 0330 hours) delayed reproductive development more than the earlier interruptions.

The results did not support the hypothesis that light treatments every other night would delay reproductive development as much as every-night interruptions. The lighting regime needed to delay reproductive development will depend on the photoperiod requirements of the cultivars and duration of the delay that is desired.
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Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0011-183X ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2367
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Author Mouland, J.W.; Martial, F.; Watson, A.; Lucas, R.J.; Brown, T.M.
Title Cones Support Alignment to an Inconsistent World by Suppressing Mouse Circadian Responses to the Blue Colors Associated with Twilight Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication (up) Current Biology Abbreviated Journal Current Biology
Volume 29 Issue 24 Pages 4260-4267.e4
Keywords Animals; Circadian Rhythm; mouse models; cones
Abstract In humans, short-wavelength light evokes larger circadian responses than longer wavelengths. This reflects the fact that melanopsin, a key contributor to circadian assessments of light intensity, most efficiently captures photons around 480 nm and gives rise to the popular view that ‘‘blue’’ light exerts the strongest effects on the clock. However, in the natural world, there is often no direct correlation be- tween perceived color (as reported by the cone-based visual system) and melanopsin excitation. Accordingly, although the mammalian clock does receive cone-based chromatic signals, the influence of color on circadian responses to light remains unclear. Here, we define the nature and functional significance of chromatic influences on the mouse circadian sys- tem. Using polychromatic lighting and mice with altered cone spectral sensitivity (Opn1mwR), we generate conditions that differ in color (i.e., ratio of L- to S-cone opsin activation) while providing identical melanopsin and rod activation. When biased toward S-opsin activation (appearing ‘‘blue’’), these stimuli reliably produce weaker circadian behavioral responses than those favoring L-opsin (‘‘yellow’’). This influence of color (which is absent in animals lacking cone phototransduction; Cnga3/) aligns with natural changes in spectral composition over twilight, where decreasing solar angle is accompanied by a strong blue shift. Accordingly, we find that naturalistic color changes support circadian alignment when environmental conditions render diurnal variations in light intensity weak/ambiguous sources of timing information. Our data thus establish how color contributes to circadian entrainment in mammals and provide important new insight to inform the design of lighting environments that benefit health.
Address Centre for Biological Timing, Faculty of Biology, Medicine & Health, University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PT, UK; timothy.brown(at)manchester.ac.uk
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Cell Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0960-9822 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 2785
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Author van Grunsven, R.H.A.; van Deijk, J.R.; Donners, M.; Berendse, F.; Visser, M.E.; Veenendaal, E.; Spoelstra, K.
Title Experimental light at night has a negative long-term impact on macro-moth populations Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication (up) Current Biology Abbreviated Journal Current Biology
Volume 30 Issue 12 Pages R694-R695
Keywords Animals; Ecology
Abstract The current decline in insect numbers and biomass is likely due to several factors [1] and one of the lesser studied factors is the increased artificial light at night (ALAN). Several negative impacts of ALAN on insects have been described [2] but evidence that it ultimately results in population declines has been circumstantial due to a lack of emperical data [3,4]. Here, we experimentally exposed natural habitats to three colours of artificial light, and a dark control, and studied the impact on moth population numbers during five consecutive years. With this experimental, multi-year study, we can isolate the effects of artificial light from other anthropogenic factors that are often confounded in correlative studies. Furthermore, we can study long-term effects that only become apparent after several years. In the first two years, the number of moths in the illuminated and dark treatments did not differ, but after the second year, the number of moths in the illuminated treatments was lower than in the dark control (Figure 1). This first implies a causal relationship between ALAN and local population declines and thus a contribution of ALAN to insect declines.
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Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0960-9822 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3011
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Author Torres, D.; Tidau, S.; Jenkins, S.; Davies, T.
Title Artificial skyglow disrupts celestial migration at night Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication (up) Current Biology Abbreviated Journal Current Biology
Volume 30 Issue 12 Pages R696-R697
Keywords Animals; Skyglow
Abstract Our understanding of the ecological impacts of direct outdoor lighting has improved substantially over the last decade [1, 2, 3]. In contrast, the impacts of artificial skyglow — that is, artificial light that is scattered in the atmosphere and reflected back to the ground — have received comparatively little attention [4]. Artificial skyglow extends the influence of direct lighting out to hundreds of kilometres from direct sources (for example street lights). It is the most geographically widespread form of light pollution, affecting 23% of the world’s land surface (between 75°N and 60°S) [5]. Artificial skyglow illuminances are two orders of magnitude lower (0.2–0.5 lx) than light pollution from direct artificial light (typically 10–100 lx), but greater than moonlight (0.1–0.3 lx) and light from the Milky Way (0.001 lx). Numerous organisms from across the animal kingdom orient themselves during migrations using lunar compasses [6, 7, 8, 9], and are vulnerable to artificial skyglow across large (10–100 km) spatial scales. Here we demonstrate that artificial skyglow disrupts nightly migrations by the amphipod Talitrus saltator (commonly known as the sandhopper), which uses the sky position of the moon [9, 10] as a guide.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0960-9822 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3012
Permanent link to this record