|   | 
Details
   web
Records
Author Berger, A.; Lozano, B.; Barthel, L.M.F.; Schubert, N.
Title Moving in the Dark-Evidence for an Influence of Artificial Light at Night on the Movement Behaviour of European Hedgehogs (Erinaceus europaeus) Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication (up) Animals : an Open Access Journal From MDPI Abbreviated Journal Animals (Basel)
Volume 10 Issue 8 Pages
Keywords Animals; Alan; Erinaceus europaeus; Gps; acceleration; activity; conservation; hedgehogs; light pollution; movement behaviour; urbanisation
Abstract With urban areas growing worldwide comes an increase in artificial light at night (ALAN), causing a significant impact on wildlife behaviour and its ecological relationships. The effects of ALAN on nocturnal and protected European hedgehogs (Erinaceus europaeus) are unknown but their identification is important for sustainable species conservation and management. In a pilot study, we investigated the influence of ALAN on the natural movement behaviour of 22 hedgehogs (nine females, 13 males) in urban environments. Over the course of four years, we equipped hedgehogs at three different study locations in Berlin with biologgers to record their behaviour for several weeks. We used Global Positioning System (GPS) tags to monitor their spatial behaviour, very high-frequency (VHF) loggers to locate their nests during daytime, and accelerometers to distinguish between active and passive behaviours. We compared the mean light intensity of the locations recorded when the hedgehogs were active with the mean light intensity of simulated locations randomly distributed in the individual's home range. We were able to show that the ALAN intensity of the hedgehogs' habitations was significantly lower compared to the simulated values, regardless of the animal's sex. This ALAN-related avoidance in the movement behaviour can be used for applied hedgehog conservation.
Address Department of Animal Behaviour, Bielefeld University, Konsequenz 45, 33615 Bielefeld, Germany
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2076-2615 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:32751525 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3066
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Adams, J.
Title Duration of Light and Growth Type Journal Article
Year 1924 Publication (up) Annals of Botany Abbreviated Journal
Volume 38 Issue 151 Pages 509-523
Keywords Plants
Abstract
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2391
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Adams, J.
Title The Effect on Certain Plants of altering the Daily Period of Light Type Journal Article
Year 1923 Publication (up) Annals of Botany Abbreviated Journal
Volume 37 Issue 145 Pages 75-94
Keywords Plants
Abstract
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2406
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Lapostolle, D, & Challéat, S.
Title Making Darkness a Place-Based Resource: How the Fight against Light Pollution Reconfigures Rural Areas in France Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication (up) Annals of the American Association of Geographers Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords Conservation; Society
Abstract Light pollution refers to the degradation of darkness through the use of artificial light at night in and around human infrastructures. This pollution is intrinsically related to urbanization and spills out from urban areas to affect both rural and protected areas. Several countries are organizing the fight against light pollution. There, local communities are experimenting with environmental policies designed to protect darkness. The challenge is about preserving biodiversity and fostering the energy transition. In France, a number of pioneering rural areas are experimenting with mechanisms that include this dual implication. Two of them provide the case study for this article. We show how these areas turn darkness into a specific resource. We identify three specification processes. The first obeys an anthropocentric utilitarian rationale and is part of the “economicization” of the environment in the line of shallow ecology. The second follows a rationale of ecocentric conservation and is part of the radical ecologization of the economy, in line with deep ecology. The third is in keeping with an integrated socioecosystemic rationale enshrining the interdependence between development, planning, the preservation of biodiversity, and energy savings. Local areas are plagued with specification controversies. These areas become incubation rooms; that is, spaces for resolving these controversies. These are reflected in a transition operator enabling the local area to take a fresh trajectory in terms of development and planning.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2949
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Derrien, M.M.; Stokowski, P.A.
Title Discursive constructions of night sky experiences: Imagination and imaginaries in national park visitor narratives Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication (up) Annals of Tourism Research Abbreviated Journal Annals of Tourism Research
Volume 85 Issue Pages 103038
Keywords Astrotourism; Society
Abstract Communities and protected areas worldwide have initiated programs to protect and promote dark night skies. Yet, limited research has explored how and why night skies become of interest or meaningful to people. Because night skies are literally beyond human reach, we focus on how visitors to a U.S. national park imagine night skies and invoke imaginaries that make night skies meaningful. Drawing from interviews, we examine how visitors use symbolic language, narrative, and other discursive practices to develop the social, cultural, and spatial contexts of their night sky experiences. Findings inform our understanding of imagination and imaginaries in tourism and recreation research, while offering new approaches to night skies research.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0160-7383 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3118
Permanent link to this record