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Author Bielli, A.; Alfaro-Shigueto, J.; Doherty, P.D.; Godley, B.J.; Ortiz, C.; Pasara, A.; Wang, J.H.; Mangel, J.C.
Title An illuminating idea to reduce bycatch in the Peruvian small-scale gillnet fishery Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication (up) Biological Conservation Abbreviated Journal Biological Conservation
Volume in press Issue Pages 108277
Keywords Animals; oceans; bycatch; artificial illumination; bycatch reduction technologies
Abstract Found in the coastal waters of all continents, gillnets are the largest component of small-scale fisheries for many countries. Numerous studies show that these fisheries often have high bycatch rates of threatened marine species such as sea turtles, small cetaceans and seabirds, resulting in possible population declines of these non-target groups. However, few solutions to reduce gillnet bycatch have been developed. Recent bycatch reduction technologies (BRTs) use sensory cues to alert non-target species to the presence of fishing gear. In this study we deployed light emitting diodes (LEDs) – a visual cue – on the floatlines of paired gillnets (control vs illuminated net) during 864 fishing sets on small-scale vessels departing from three Peruvian ports between 2015 and 2018. Bycatch probability per set for sea turtles, cetaceans and seabirds as well as catch per unit effort (CPUE) of target species were analysed for illuminated and control nets using a generalised linear mixed-effects model (GLMM). For illuminated nets, bycatch probability per set was reduced by up to 74.4 % for sea turtles and 70.8 % for small cetaceans in comparison to non-illuminated, control nets. For seabirds, nominal BPUEs decreased by 84.0 % in the presence of LEDs. Target species CPUE was not negatively affected by the presence of LEDs. This study highlights the efficacy of net illumination as a multi-taxa BRT for small-scale gillnet fisheries in Peru. These results are promising given the global ubiquity of small-scale net fisheries, the relatively low cost of LEDs and the current lack of alternate solutions to bycatch.
Address Centre for Ecology and Conservation, University of Exeter, Penryn, Cornwall, TR10 9FE, UK; bielli.alessandra(at)gmail.com
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Elsevier Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0006-3207 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2779
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Author Cochard, P.; Galstian, T.; Cloutier, C.
Title The proportion of blue light affects parasitoid wasp behavior in LED-extended photoperiod in greenhouses: Increased parasitism and offspring sex ratio bias Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication (up) Biological Control Abbreviated Journal Biological Control
Volume 133 Issue Pages 9-17
Keywords Animals
Abstract The increasing use of specific wavelengths involving light-emitting diodes (LEDs) under greenhouses enables to overcome the lack of light during winter months, helping crops photosynthesis or vegetative growth. However, modification of the light environment as well as the photoperiod may also alter directly or indirectly the activity of both beneficial and pest insects that depend on plants. Here, we submitted the parasitic wasp Aphidius ervi and its main host the pea aphid, to 4 ratios of red(R): blue(B) LEDs used to lengthen the photoperiod inside a growth chamber. We recorded the parasitism rate of aphids and the sex ratio of newly emerged wasps to evaluate if A. ervi could remain an efficient biological control agent under modified light environments. We found that increasing the 8 h of photophase to 16 h by supplementing with R/B LEDs increased the daily parasitic activity of the wasp as well as their egg laying behavior. Under the 100R light supplement, about 80% of the emerged adults were males, against 50% under 25R:75B light treatment. These results indicate that A. ervi remains a good biological control agent when the light environment is modified. However, the use of red light to extend the photophase has the potential to negatively affect population dynamics of these parasitoids due to its male-bias impact on the sex ratio.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1049-9644 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2253
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Author Hunter, C.M.; Figueiro, M.G.
Title Measuring Light at Night and Melatonin Levels in Shift Workers: A Review of the Literature Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication (up) Biological Research for Nursing Abbreviated Journal Biol Res Nurs
Volume 19 Issue 4 Pages 365-374
Keywords Human Health; Review
Abstract Shift work, especially that involving rotating and night shifts, is associated with an increased risk of diseases, including cancer. Attempts to explain the association between shift work and cancer in particular have focused on the processes of melatonin production and suppression. One hypothesis postulates that exposure to light at night (LAN) suppresses melatonin, whose production is known to slow the development of cancerous cells, while another proposes that circadian disruption associated with shift work, and not just LAN, increases health risks. This review focuses on six studies that employed quantitative measurement of LAN and melatonin levels to assess cancer risks in shift workers. These studies were identified via searching the PubMed database for peer-reviewed, English-language articles examining the links between shift work, LAN, and disease using the terms light at night, circadian disruption, health, risk, cancer, shift work, or rotating shift. While the results indicate a growing consensus on the relationship between disease risks (particularly cancer) and circadian disruption associated with shift work, the establishment of a direct link between LAN and disease has been impeded by contradictory studies and a lack of consistent, quantitative methods for measuring LAN in the research to date. Better protocols for assessing personal LAN exposure are required, particularly those employing calibrated devices that measure and sample exposure to workplace light conditions, to accurately assess LAN's effects on the circadian system and disease. Other methodologies, such as measuring circadian disruption and melatonin levels in the field, may also help to resolve discrepancies in the findings.
Address 1 Lighting Research Center, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY, USA
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1099-8004 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:28627309; PMCID:PMC5862149 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2458
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Author Rowan, W.
Title Light And Seasonal Reproduction In Animals Type Journal Article
Year 1938 Publication (up) Biological Reviews Abbreviated Journal Biological Reviews
Volume 13 Issue 4 Pages 374-401
Keywords Animals
Abstract
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1464-7931 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2395
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Author Fobert, E.K.; Burke da Silva, K.; Swearer, S.E.
Title Artificial light at night causes reproductive failure in clownfish Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication (up) Biology Letters Abbreviated Journal Biol. Lett.
Volume 15 Issue 7 Pages 20190272
Keywords Animals
Abstract The Earth is getting brighter at night, as artificial light at night (ALAN) continues to increase and extend its reach. Despite recent recognition of the damaging impacts of ALAN on terrestrial ecosystems, research on ALAN in marine systems is comparatively lacking. To further our understanding of the impacts of ALAN on marine organisms, this study examines how the reproductive fitness of the common clownfish Amphiprion ocellaris is influenced by the presence of ALAN. We assessed how exposure to low levels of ALAN affects (i) frequency of spawning, (ii) egg fertilization success, and (iii) hatching success of A. ocellaris under control (12 : 12 day–night) and treatment (12 : 12 day–ALAN) light regimes. While we found exposure to ALAN had no impact on the frequency of spawning or fertilization success, ALAN had dramatic effects on hatching. Amphiprion ocellaris eggs incubated in the presence of ALAN simply did not hatch, resulting in zero survivorship of offspring. These findings suggest ALAN can significantly reduce reproductive fitness in a benthic-spawning reef fish. Further research in this field is necessary to fully understand the extent of this impact on population and community dynamics in the wild.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1744-9561 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2562
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