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Author Li, Y.; Cheng, S.; Li, L.; Zhao, Y.; Shen, W.; Sun, X. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Light-exposure at night impairs mouse ovary development via cell apoptosis and DNA damage Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication (up) Bioscience Reports Abbreviated Journal Biosci Rep  
  Volume 39 Issue Pages BSR20181464  
  Keywords Human Health; Animals; mouse models; ovaries  
  Abstract The alternation of light and dark rhythm causes a series of physiological, biochemical and metabolic changes in animals, which also alters the growth and development of animals, and feeding, migration, reproduction and other behavioral activities. In recent years, many studies have reported the effects of long-term (more than 6 weeks) illumination on ovarian growth and development. In this study, we observed the damage, repair and apoptosis of ovarian DNA in a short period of illumination. The results showed that, in short time (less than 2 weeks) illumination conditions, the 24 hrs-light treatment caused the reduction of total ovarian follicle number and downregulation of circadian clock related genes. Furthermore, the changed levels of serum sex hormones were also detected after 24 hrs-light exposure, of which the concentrations of LH (luteinizing hormone), FSH (follicle-stimulating hormone) and E2 (estradiol) were increased, but the concentration of PROG (progesterone) was decreased. Moreover, 24 hrs-light exposure increased the expression of DNA damage and repair related genes, the number of TUNEL and RAD51 positive cells. These results indicated that 24 hrs-light exposure for 4 days, 8days and 12 days increased DNA damage and cell apoptosis, thereby affecting the development of ovary.  
  Address Qingdao agricultural university, Qingdao, China; xfsun@qau.edu.cn  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Portland Press Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0144-8463 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:30962269 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2293  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Bissonnette, T.H.; Csech, A.G. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Fertile Eggs from Pheasants in January by “Night-Lighting” Type Journal Article
  Year 1936 Publication (up) Bird-Banding Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 7 Issue 3 Pages 108  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0006-3630 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2403  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Hoffmann, J.; Schirmer, A.; Eccard, J.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Light pollution affects space use and interaction of two small mammal species irrespective of personality Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication (up) BMC Ecology Abbreviated Journal BMC Ecol  
  Volume 19 Issue 1 Pages 26  
  Keywords Animals; Animal personality; Hirec; Interspecific interactions; Nighttime illumination; Outdoor enclosure; Rodents  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Artificial light at night (ALAN) is one form of human-induced rapid environmental changes (HIREC) and is strongly interfering with natural dark-light cycles. Some personality types within a species might be better suited to cope with environmental change and therefore might be selected upon under ongoing urbanization. RESULTS: We used LED street lamps in a large outdoor enclosure to experimentally investigate the effects of ALAN on activity patterns, movement and interaction of individuals of two species, the bank vole (Myodes glareolus) and the striped field mouse (Apodemus agrarius). We analyzed effects combined with individual boldness score. Both species reduced their activity budget during daylight hours. While under natural light conditions home ranges were larger during daylight than during nighttime, this difference vanished under ALAN. Conspecifics showed reduced home range overlap, proximity and activity synchrony when subjected to nighttime illumination. Changes in movement patterns in reaction to ALAN were not associated with differences in boldness score of individuals. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that light pollution can lead to changes in movement patterns and individual interactions in small mammals. This could lead to fitness consequences on the population level.  
  Address Animal Ecology, University of Potsdam, Maulbeerallee 1, 14469, Potsdam, Germany  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1472-6785 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:31215409; PMCID:PMC6582560 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2584  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Breitler, J.-C.; Djerrab, D.; Leran, S.; Toniutti, L.; Guittin, C.; Severac, D.; Pratlong, M.; Dereeper, A.; Etienne, H.; Bertrand, B. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Full moonlight-induced circadian clock entrainment in Coffea arabica Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication (up) BMC Plant Biology Abbreviated Journal BMC Plant Biol  
  Volume 20 Issue 1 Pages 24  
  Keywords Moonlight; Plants  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: It is now well documented that moonlight affects the life cycle of invertebrates, birds, reptiles, and mammals. The lunisolar tide is also well-known to alter plant growth and development. However, although plants are known to be very photosensitive, few studies have been undertaken to explore the effect of moonlight on plant physiology. RESULTS: Here for the first time we report a massive transcriptional modification in Coffea arabica genes under full moonlight conditions, particularly at full moon zenith and 3 h later. Among the 3387 deregulated genes found in our study, the main core clock genes were affected. CONCLUSIONS: Moonlight also negatively influenced many genes involved in photosynthesis, chlorophyll biosynthesis and chloroplast machinery at the end of the night, suggesting that the full moon has a negative effect on primary photosynthetic machinery at dawn. Moreover, full moonlight promotes the transcription of major rhythmic redox genes and many heat shock proteins, suggesting that moonlight is perceived as stress. We confirmed this huge impact of weak light (less than 6 lx) on the transcription of circadian clock genes in controlled conditions mimicking full moonlight.  
  Address UMR IPME, Univ. Montpellier, CIRAD, IRD, F-34394, Montpellier, France  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1471-2229 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:31941456 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2817  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Albala, L.; Bober, T.; Hale, G.; Warfield, B.; Collins, M.L.; Merritt, Z.; Steimetz, E.; Nadler, S.; Lev, Y.; Hanifin, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effect on nurse and patient experience: overnight use of blue-depleted illumination Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication (up) BMJ Open Quality Abbreviated Journal BMJ Open Qual  
  Volume 8 Issue 3 Pages e000692  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract Background Typical hospital lighting is rich in blue-wavelength emission, which can create unwanted circadian disruption in patients when exposed at night. Despite a growing body of evidence regarding the effects of poor sleep on health outcomes, physiologically neutral technologies have not been widely implemented in the US healthcare system.

Objective The authors sought to determine if rechargeable, proximity-sensing, blue-depleted lighting pods that provide wireless task lighting can make overnight hospital care more efficient for providers and less disruptive to patients.

Design Non-randomised, controlled interventional trial in an intermediate-acuity unit at a large urban medical centre.

Methods Night-time healthcare providers abstained from turning on overhead patient room lighting in favour of a physiologically neutral lighting device. 33 nurses caring for patients on that unit were surveyed after each shift. 21 patients were evaluated after two nights with standard-of-care light and after two nights with lighting intervention.

Results Providers reported a satisfaction score of 8 out of 10, with 82% responding that the lighting pods provided adequate lighting for overnight care tasks. Among patients, a median 2-point improvement on the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale was reported.

Conclusion and relevance The authors noted improved caregiver satisfaction and decreased patient anxiety by using a blue-depleted automated task-lighting alternative to overhead room lights. Larger studies are needed to determine the impact of these lighting devices on sleep measures and patient health outcomes like delirium. With the shift to patient-centred financial incentives and emphasis on patient experience, this study points to the feasibility of a physiologically targeted solution for overnight task lighting in healthcare environments.
 
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2399-6641 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2681  
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