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Author Lee, S.-I.; Kinoshita, S.; Noguchi, A.; Eto, T.; Ohashi, M.; Nishimura, Y.; Maeda, K.; Motomura, Y.; Awata, Y.; Higuchi, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Melatonin suppression during a simulated night shift in medium intensity light is increased by 10-minute breaks in dim light and decreased by 10-minute breaks in bright light Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication (up) Chronobiology International Abbreviated Journal Chronobiol Int  
  Volume in press Issue Pages in press  
  Keywords Human Health; Humans; intermittent light at night exposure; light adaptation; melatonin suppression; night shift work; performance; short duration; subjective sleepiness  
  Abstract Exposure to light at night results in disruption of endogenous circadian rhythmicity and/or suppression of pineal melatonin, which can consequently lead to acute or chronic adverse health problems. In the present study, we investigated whether exposure to very dim light or very bright light for a short duration influences melatonin suppression, subjective sleepiness, and performance during exposure to constant moderately bright light. Twenty-four healthy male university students were divided into two experimental groups: Half of them (mean age: 20.0 +/- 0.9 years) participated in an experiment for short-duration (10 min) light conditions of medium intensity light (430 lx, medium breaks) vs. very dim light (< 1 lx, dim breaks) and the other half (mean age: 21.3 +/- 2.5 years) participated in an experiment for short-duration light conditions of medium intensity light (430 lx, medium breaks) vs. very bright light (4700 lx, bright breaks). Each simulated night shift consisting of 5 sets (each including 50-minute night work and 10-minute break) was performed from 01:00 to 06:00 h. The subjects were exposed to medium intensity light (550 lx) during the night work. Each 10-minute break was conducted every hour from 02:00 to 06:00 h. Salivary melatonin concentrations were measured, subjective sleepiness was assessed, the psychomotor vigilance task was performed at hourly intervals from 21:00 h until the end of the experiment. Compared to melatonin suppression between 04:00 and 06:00 h in the condition of medium breaks, the condition of dim breaks significantly promoted melatonin suppression and the condition of bright breaks significantly diminished melatonin suppression. However, there was no remarkable effect of either dim breaks or bright breaks on subjective sleepiness and performance of the psychomotor vigilance task. Our findings suggest that periodic exposure to light for short durations during exposure to a constant light environment affects the sensitivity of pineal melatonin to constant light depending on the difference between light intensities in the two light conditions (i.e., short light exposure vs. constant light exposure). Also, our findings indicate that exposure to light of various intensities at night could be a factor influencing the light-induced melatonin suppression in real night work settings.  
  Address Department of Human Science, Faculty of Design, Kyushu University, Fukuoka, Japan  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0742-0528 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:32326827 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2894  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Maroni, M.J.; Capri, K.M.; Arruda, N.L.; Gelineau, R.R.; Deane, H.V.; Concepcion, H.A.; DeCourcey, H.; Monteiro De Pina, I.K.; Cushman, A.V.; Chasse, M.H.; Logan, R.W.; Seggio, J.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Substrain specific behavioral responses in male C57BL/6N and C57BL/6J mice to a shortened 21-hour day and high-fat diet Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication (up) Chronobiology International Abbreviated Journal Chronobiol Int  
  Volume in press Issue Pages  
  Keywords Animals; Mouse; circadian; high-fat diet; locomotor activity; photoperiod; strain differences  
  Abstract Altered circadian rhythms have negative consequences on health and behavior. Emerging evidence suggests genetics influences the physiological and behavioral responses to circadian disruption. We investigated the effects of a 21 h day (T = 21 cycle), with high-fat diet consumption, on locomotor activity, explorative behaviors, and health in male C57BL/6J and C57BL/6N mice. Mice were exposed to either a T = 24 or T = 21 cycle and given standard rodent chow (RC) or a 60% high-fat diet (HFD) followed by behavioral assays and physiological measures. We uncovered numerous strain differences within the behavioral and physiological assays, mainly that C57BL/6J mice exhibit reduced susceptibility to the obesogenic effects of (HFD) and anxiety-like behavior as well as increased circadian and novelty-induced locomotor activity compared to C57BL/6N mice. There were also substrain-specific differences in behavioral responses to the T = 21 cycle, including exploratory behaviors and circadian locomotor activity. Under the 21-h day, mice consuming RC displayed entrainment, while mice exposed to HFD exhibited a lengthening of activity rhythms. In the open-field and light-dark box, mice exposed to the T = 21 cycle had increased novelty-induced locomotor activity with no further effects of diet, suggesting daylength may affect mood-related behaviors. These results indicate that different circadian cycles impact metabolic and behavioral responses depending on genetic background, and despite circadian entrainment.  
  Address Department of Biological Sciences, Bridgewater State University, Bridgewater, Massachusetts, USA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0742-0528 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:32400203 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2919  
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Author Esaki, Y.; Obayashi, K.; Saeki, K.; Fujita, K.; Iwata, N.; Kitajima, T. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Association between light exposure at night and manic symptoms in bipolar disorder: cross-sectional analysis of the APPLE cohort Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication (up) Chronobiology International Abbreviated Journal Chronobiol Int  
  Volume in press Issue Pages in press  
  Keywords Human Health; Bipolar disorder; circadian rhythm; dark; light at night; manic symptom  
  Abstract Previous studies have found that keeping the room dark at night was associated with a decrease in manic symptoms for patients with bipolar disorder (BD). However, the association between light at night of real-life conditions and manic symptoms is unclear. We investigated the association between bedroom light exposure at night and manic symptoms in BD patients. One-hundred and eighty-four outpatients with BD participated in this cross-sectional study. The average light intensity at night during sleep was evaluated using a portable photometer for seven consecutive nights. Manic symptoms were assessed using the Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS), and scores >/=5 were treated as a “hypomanic state.” The median (interquartile range) YMRS score was 2.0 (0-5.0), and 52 (28.2%) participants were in a hypomanic state. The prevalence of a hypomanic state was significantly higher in the participants with an average light intensity at night exposure of >/=3 lux than in those with <3 lux (36.7% versus 21.9%; P = .02). In multivariable logistic regression analysis adjusted for BD type, depressive symptoms, sleep duration, and daytime physical activity, the odds ratio (OR) for a hypomanic state was significantly higher for the participants with an average light intensity at night exposure of >/=3 lux than for those with <3 lux (OR: 2.15, 95% confidence interval: 1.09-4.22, P = .02). This association remained significant at the cutoff value of YMRS score >/=6 (OR: 2.51, 95% confidence interval: 1.15-5.46; P = .02). The findings of this study indicate bedroom light exposure at night is significantly associated with manic symptoms in BD patients. Although the results of this cross-sectional investigation do not necessarily imply causality, they may serve to inform beneficial nonpharmacological intervention and personalized treatment of BD patients.  
  Address Department of Psychiatry, Fujita Health University School of Medicine, Aichi, Japan  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0742-0528 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:32238002 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2924  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Bagci, S.; Sabir, H.; Muller, A.; Reiter, R.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of altered photoperiod due to COVID-19 lockdown on pregnant women and their fetuses Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication (up) Chronobiology International Abbreviated Journal Chronobiol Int  
  Volume in press Issue Pages in press  
  Keywords Human Health; Covid-19; circadian disruption; fetus; lockdown; melatonin; pregnant Women  
  Abstract Maternal circadian rhythms provide highly important input into the entrainment and programming of fetal and newborn circadian rhythms. The light-dark cycle is an important regulator of the internal biological clock. Even though pregnant women spend a greater part of the day at home during the latter stages of pregnancy, natural light exposure is crucial for the fetus. The current recommended COVID-19 lockdown might dramatically alter normal environmental lighting conditions of pregnant women, resulting in exposure to extremely low levels of natural daylight and high-intensity artificial light sources during both day and night. This article summarizes the potential effects on pregnant woman and their fetuses due to prolonged exposure to altered photoperiod and as consequence altered circadian system, known as chronodisruption, that may result from the COVID-19 lockdown.  
  Address Department of Cell Systems and Anatomy, UT Health San Antonio , San Antonio, Texas, USA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0742-0528 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:32519912 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3007  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Liu, Y.; Zhang, X.; Pan, X.; Ma, X.; Tang, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The spatial integration and coordinated industrial development of urban agglomerations in the Yangtze River Economic Belt, China Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication (up) Cities Abbreviated Journal Cities  
  Volume 104 Issue Pages 102801  
  Keywords Remote Sensing  
  Abstract Urban agglomeration is the engine of national development and regional prosperity. Although extensive work has investigated issues related to this new form of spatial governance, few studies have directly illustrated the spatial integration of urban agglomeration and its relationship with industrial development. This paper employs nighttime light data and industrial enterprise datasets to investigate the spatial integration and industrial development in the Yangtze River Economic Belt (YREB) of China for 1995–2015. We here illustrate the significant relationship between the spatial integration of urban agglomerations and the characteristics of industrial development. In the process of spatial integration, urban form, intercity relation and their evolution show clear regional differences. Because of the differences in socio-economic and geographical characteristics, urban systems are more advanced and closely related in developed areas. A significant negative (positive) spatial correlation between industrial specialization (diversification) and urban form is supported by using bivariate Moran's I, and spatial clustering patterns are clearly different across the three urban agglomerations. A panel regression reveals that intercity relations are significantly associated with the characteristics of industrial development. Higher levels of industrial diversification and competition are associated with weaker intercity relations, while industrial structures similarities are reversed. These findings could be used to formulate reasonable policies and plans and to support future regional spatial integration and coordinated development.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0264-2751 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2986  
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