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Author Stock, D.; Schernhammer, E. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Does night work affect age at which menopause occurs? Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication (up) Current Opinion in Endocrinology, Diabetes, and Obesity Abbreviated Journal Curr Opin Endocrinol Diabetes Obes  
  Volume 26 Issue 6 Pages 306–312  
  Keywords Human Health; Review; shift work; Menopause; women  
  Abstract PURPOSE OF REVIEW: To delineate the current state of evidence on the impact of night shift work on age at natural menopause. RECENT FINDINGS: The only direct evidence is from a single observational study, which indicates that women who work night shifts are at moderately higher risk for earlier menopause and that this risk is more pronounced among younger women. Underlying biological mechanisms have yet to be sufficiently substantiated. A long-held line of inquiry, most strongly propagated by the observed link between night shift work and female breast cancer, is the 'Light at Night' hypothesis, which suggests melatonin-mediated circadian disruption as a potential regulator of reproductive signaling in women. Supporting evidence is found from observations of changes in endogenous melatonin production among night working women or in response to light exposure, and corresponding changes in endogenous ovarian hormone levels and modulated menstrual patterns, among other indications of altered central ovulation-governing processes. Susceptibility to night shift work may be modified by chronotype. SUMMARY: This review summarizes the literature related to night work and ovulatory regulation in humans, prioritizing population-based evidence to provide motivation for the study of circadian disruption and night shift work as a regulator of menopausal timing.  
  Address Department of Epidemiology, Center for Public Health, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1752-296X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:31644468 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2708  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Torres-Farfan, C.; Mendez, N.; Ehrefeld, P.; Seron-Ferre, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title In utero circadian changes; facing light pollution Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication (up) Current Opinion in Physiology Abbreviated Journal Current Opinion in Physiology  
  Volume 13 Issue Pages 128-134  
  Keywords Human Health; Review; In Utero; Pregnancy; Circadian Rhythm  
  Abstract Regardless of the molecular and physiological mechanisms involved, maternal fetal circadian systems interactions are recognized as crucial crosstalk for fetal development, and in turn, it may be a key factor determining fitting health in adulthood. However, in the last 100 years, life on the planet has altered the natural light-dark cycle by increasing light at night inducing disorganization of the circadian system, i.e. chronodisruption, including perturbation of the melatonin circadian rhythm by decreasing its nocturnal peak. The reduction in melatonin is associated with gradual losses in antioxidant protection, immunological and anti-inflammatory effects and as stated by WHO, the lack of nocturnal peak of melatonin is a deleterious signal that may induce chronic disease and cancer. Collectively the current review provides evidence about the role played by maternal circadian rhythms in fetal development and the impact of fetal-maternal desynchronization in the health and diseases of the offspring.  
  Address Laboratory of Developmental Chronobiology, Faculty of Medicine, Universidad Austral de Chile, Valdivia, Chile; claudia.torres(at)uach.cl  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Elsever Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2468-8673 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2761  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Woods, H. C., & Scott, H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Merging the Biological and Cognitive Processes of Sleep and Screens Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication (up) Current Sleep Medicine Reports Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 5 Issue 3 Pages 150-155  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract Purpose of Review

Screens are a permanent feature of life today and we have reached an interesting juncture with different research agendas investigating the biological and cognitive aspects of screen use separately. This review argues that it is timely and indeed essential that we bring together these research areas to fully understand both positive and negative aspects of screen use.

Recent Findings

More recent work is starting to take a more cohesive approach to understanding how device use pre-bedtime can impact our sleep by including both light and content in their experimental protocols which is a welcome development leading to a more nuanced understanding of both biological and cognitive processes.

Summary

We call for an open and collaborative approach to gain momentum in this direction of acknowledging both biological and cognitive factors enabling us to understand the relative impacts of both whilst using screens with regard to both light and content.
 
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2640  
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Author Opperhuizen, A.-L.; Stenvers, D.J.; Jansen, R.D.; Foppen, E.; Fliers, E.; Kalsbeek, A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Light at night acutely impairs glucose tolerance in a time-, intensity- and wavelength-dependent manner in rats Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication (up) Diabetologia Abbreviated Journal Diabetologia  
  Volume 60 Issue 7 Pages 1333-1343  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Exposure to light at night (LAN) has increased dramatically in recent decades. Animal studies have shown that chronic dim LAN induced obesity and glucose intolerance. Furthermore, several studies in humans have demonstrated that chronic exposure to artificial LAN may have adverse health effects with an increased risk of metabolic disorders, including type 2 diabetes. It is well-known that acute exposure to LAN affects biological clock function, hormone secretion and the activity of the autonomic nervous system, but data on the effects of LAN on glucose homeostasis are lacking. This study aimed to investigate the acute effects of LAN on glucose metabolism. METHODS: Male Wistar rats were subjected to i.v. glucose or insulin tolerance tests while exposed to 2 h of LAN in the early or late dark phase. In subsequent experiments, different light intensities and wavelengths were used. RESULTS: LAN exposure early in the dark phase at ZT15 caused increased glucose responses during the first 20 min after glucose infusion (p < 0.001), whereas LAN exposure at the end of the dark phase, at ZT21, caused increased insulin responses during the first 10 min (p < 0.01), indicating that LAN immediately induces glucose intolerance in rats. Subsequent experiments demonstrated that the effect of LAN was both intensity- and wavelength-dependent. White light of 50 and 150 lx induced greater glucose responses than 5 and 20 lx, whereas all intensities other than 5 lx reduced locomotor activity. Green light induced glucose intolerance, but red and blue light did not, suggesting the involvement of a specific retina-brain pathway. CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION: Together, these data show that exposure to LAN has acute adverse effects on glucose metabolism in a time-, intensity- and wavelength-dependent manner.  
  Address Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Academic Medical Center (AMC) University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, the Netherlands  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0012-186X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28374068; PMCID:PMC5487588 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2459  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Czaczkes, T.J.; Bastidas-Urrutia, A.M.; Ghislandi, P.; Tuni, C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Reduced light avoidance in spiders from populations in light-polluted urban environments Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication (up) Die Naturwissenschaften Abbreviated Journal Naturwissenschaften  
  Volume 105 Issue 11-12 Pages 64  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract Increased urbanisation is leading to a rise in light pollution. Light pollution can disrupt the behaviour and physiology of animals resulting in increased mortality. However, animals may also benefit from artificial light sources, as these may aggregate prey or signal suitable environments. For example, spiders are commonly seen congregating around artificial light sources. Changes in selective pressures engendered by urban environments are driving changes in urban organisms, driving better adaptation to these environments. Here, we ask whether urban populations of the synanthropic spider Steatoda triangulosa show different responses to light compared to rural populations. Egg-sacs from urban and rural populations were collected and incubated in a common garden setting, and the emerging spiderlings tested for light preference. While rural spiderlings avoided light (37% built webs in the light), urban spiderlings were indifferent to it (49% built webs in the light). Reduced light avoidance may benefit spiders through increased prey capture, increased movement into suitable habitats, or due to a release from selection pressure from visually hunting predators which do not enter buildings.  
  Address Department of Biology, Ludwig-Maximilians University of Munich, Grosshaderner Str. 2, 82152, Planegg-Martinsried, Germany  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0028-1042 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:30377809 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2140  
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