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Author Niklaus, S.; Albertini, S.; Schnitzer, T.K.; Denk, N. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Challenging a Myth and Misconception: Red-Light Vision in Rats Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication (up) Animals : an Open Access Journal From MDPI Abbreviated Journal Animals (Basel)  
  Volume 10 Issue 3 Pages  
  Keywords animals; cones; electroretinogram; husbandry; photoreceptors; rat; red light; retina; rods  
  Abstract Due to the lack of L-cones in the rodent retina, it is generally assumed that red light is invisible to rodents. Thus, red lights and red filter foils are widely used in rodent husbandry and experimentation allowing researchers to observe animals in an environment that is thought to appear dark to the animals. To better understand red-light vision in rodents, we assessed retinal sensitivity of pigmented and albino rats to far-red light by electroretinogram. We examined the sensitivity to red light not only on the light- but also dark-adapted retina, as red observation lights in husbandry are used during the dark phase of the light cycle. Intriguingly, both rods and cones of pigmented as well as albino rats show a retinal response to red light, with a high sensitivity of the dark-adapted retina and large electroretinogram responses in the mesopic range. Our results challenge the misconception of rodents being red-light blind. Researchers and housing facilities should rethink the use of red observation lights at night.  
  Address Pharma Research and Early Development (pRED), Pharmaceutical Sciences (PS), Roche Innovation Center Basel, 4070 Basel, Switzerland  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2076-2615 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:32138167 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2844  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Leveau, L.M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Artificial Light at Night (ALAN) Is the Main Driver of Nocturnal Feral Pigeon (Columba livia f. domestica) Foraging in Urban Areas Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication (up) Animals : an Open Access Journal From MDPI Abbreviated Journal Animals (Basel)  
  Volume 10 Issue 4 Pages  
  Keywords Animals; Columba livia; Latin America; artificial light at night; circadian rhythm; noise; temporal homogenization  
  Abstract Artificial light at night (ALAN) is one of the most extreme environmental alterations in urban areas, which drives nocturnal activity in diurnal species. Feral Pigeon (Columba livia f. domestica), a common species in urban centers worldwide, has been observed foraging at night in urban areas. However, the role of ALAN in the nocturnal activity of this species is unknown. Moreover, studies addressing the relationship between ALAN and nocturnal activity of diurnal birds are scarce in the Southern Hemisphere. The objective of this study is to assess the environmental factors associated with nocturnal activity of the Feral Pigeon in Argentinian cities. Environmental conditions were compared between sites where pigeons were seen foraging and randomly selected sites where pigeons were not recorded foraging. Nocturnal foraging by the Feral Pigeon was recorded in three of four surveyed cities. ALAN was positively related to nocturnal foraging activity in Salta and Buenos Aires. The results obtained suggest that urbanization would promote nocturnal activity in Feral Pigeons. Moreover, nocturnal activity was mainly driven by ALAN, which probably alters the circadian rhythm of pigeons.  
  Address Departamento de Ecologia, Genetica y Evolucion, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires – IEGEBA (CONICET – UBA), Ciudad Universitaria, Pab 2, Piso 4, Buenos Aires 1426, Argentina  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2076-2615 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:32224903 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2876  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Finch, D.; Smith, B.R.; Marshall, C.; Coomber, F.G.; Kubasiewicz, L.M.; Anderson, M.; Wright, P.G.R.; Mathews, F. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of Artificial Light at Night (ALAN) on European Hedgehog Activity at Supplementary Feeding Stations Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication (up) Animals : an Open Access Journal From MDPI Abbreviated Journal Animals (Basel)  
  Volume 10 Issue 5 Pages in press  
  Keywords Animals; Erinaceus europaeus; activity pattern; camera trap; citizen science; fragmentation; hedgehogs; light pollution; lightscape; urbanisation  
  Abstract : Artificial light at night (ALAN) can have negative consequences for a wide range of taxa. However, the effects on nocturnal mammals other than bats are poorly understood. A citizen science camera trapping experiment was therefore used to assess the effect of ALAN on the activity of European hedgehogs (Erinaceus europaeus) at supplementary feeding stations in UK gardens. A crossover design was implemented at 33 gardens with two treatments-artificial light and darkness-each of which lasted for one week. The order of treatment depended on the existing lighting regime at the feeding station: dark treatments were applied first at dark feeding stations, whereas light treatments were used first where the station was already illuminated. Although temporal changes in activity patterns in response to the treatments were noted in some individuals, the direction of the effects was not consistent. Similarly, there was no overall impact of ALAN on the presence or feeding activities of hedgehogs in gardens where supplementary feeding stations were present. These findings are somewhat reassuring insofar as they demonstrate no net negative effect on a species thought to be in decline, in scenarios where the animals are already habituated to supplementary feeding. However, further research is needed to examine long-term effects and the effects of lighting on hedgehog prey, reproductive success and predation risk.  
  Address Mammal Society, London E9 6EJ, UK  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2076-2615 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:32354129 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2904  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Adams, J. url  openurl
  Title Duration of Light and Growth Type Journal Article
  Year 1924 Publication (up) Annals of Botany Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 38 Issue 151 Pages 509-523  
  Keywords Plants  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language Summary Language Original Title  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2391  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Adams, J. url  openurl
  Title The Effect on Certain Plants of altering the Daily Period of Light Type Journal Article
  Year 1923 Publication (up) Annals of Botany Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 37 Issue 145 Pages 75-94  
  Keywords Plants  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2406  
Permanent link to this record
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