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Author Mendes, C.P.; Carreira, D.; Pedrosa, F.; Beca, G.; Lautenschlager, L.; Akkawi, P.; Bercê, W.; Ferraz, K.M.P.M.B.; Galetti, M.
Title Landscape of human fear in Neotropical rainforest mammals Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Biological Conservation Abbreviated Journal Biological Conservation
Volume in press Issue Pages 108257
Keywords Animals; Remote Sensing; rainforest; Ecology
Abstract The landscape of fear has profound effects on the species behavior, with most organisms engaging in risk avoidance behaviors in areas perceived as riskier. Most risk avoidance behaviors, such as temporal avoidance, have severe trade-offs between foraging efficiency and risk reduction. Human activities are able to affect the species landscape of fear, by increasing mortality of individuals (i.e. hunting, roadkill) and by disruption of the clues used by the species to estimate predation risk (e.g. light pollution). In this study, we used an extensive camera-trapping and night-time light satellite imagery to evaluate whether human activities affect the diel activity patterns of 17 species of rainforest dwelling mammals. We found evidence of diel activity shifts in eight of 17 analyzed species, in which five species become 21.6 % more nocturnal and three species become 11.7% more diurnal in high disturbed areas. This activity shifts were observed for both diurnal and nocturnal species. Persecuted species (game and predators) were more susceptible to present activity shifts. Since changes in foraging activity may affect species fitness, the behavior of humans’ avoidance may be another driver of the Anthropocene defaunation.
Address Laboratório de Biologia da Conservação – LABIC, Departamento de Ecologia, Instituto de Biociências, Universidade Estadual Paulista – UNESP, Avenida 24A, 1515, 13506-900, Rio Claro, São Paulo, Brazil; calebepm3(at)hotmail.com
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher (down) Elsevier Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0006-3207 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2743
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Author Dominoni, D.M.; Smit, J.A.H.; Visser, M.E.; Halfwerk, W.
Title Multisensory pollution: Artificial light at night and anthropogenic noise have interactive effects on activity patterns of great tits (Parus major) Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Environmental Pollution Abbreviated Journal Environmental Pollution
Volume 256 Issue Pages 113314
Keywords Animals
Abstract Urbanisation is increasing globally at a rapid pace. Consequently, wild species face novel environmental stressors associated with urban sprawl, such as artificial light at night and noise. These stressors have pervasive effects on the behaviour and physiology of many species. Most studies have singled out the impact of just one of these stressors, while in the real world they are likely to co-occur both temporally and spatially, and we thus lack a clear understanding of the combined effect of anthropogenic stressors on wild species. Here, we experimentally exposed captive male great tits (Parus major) to artificial light at night and 24 h noise in a fully factorial experiment. We then measured the effect of both these stressors on their own and their combination on the amount and timing of activity patterns. We found that both light and noise affected activity patterns when presented alone, but in opposite ways: light increased activity, particularly at night, while noise reduced it, particularly during the day. When the two stressors were combined, we found a synergistic effect on the total activity and the nighttime activity, but an antagonistic effect on daytime activity. The significant interaction between noise and light treatment also differed among forest and city birds. Indeed, we detected a significant interactive effect on light and noise on daytime, nighttime, dusktime and offset of activity of urban birds, but not of forest birds. These results suggest that both artificial light at night and anthropogenic noise can drive changes in activity patterns, but that the specific impacts depend on the habitat of origin. Furthermore, our results demonstrate that co-occurring exposure to noise and light can lead to a stronger impact at night than predicted from the additive effects and thus that multisensory pollution may be a considerable threat for wildlife.
Address Department of Animal Ecology, Netherlands Institute of Ecology (NIOO-KNAW), Wageningen, the Netherlands; avide.dominoni(at)glasgow.ac.uk
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher (down) Elsevier Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0269-7491 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2744
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Author Wanjiru Mbugua, S.; Hay Wong, C.; Ratnayeke, S.
Title Effects of artificial light on the larvae of the firefly Lamprigera sp. in an urban city park, Peninsular Malaysia Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Journal of Asia-Pacific Entomology Abbreviated Journal Journal of Asia-Pacific Entomology
Volume 32 Issue 1 Pages 82-85
Keywords Animals; Fireflies; Lamprigera
Abstract Firefly populations are threatened globally by habitat alteration, pesticide use, and anthropogenic sources of light. Lamprigera fireflies were recently reported at an urban city park in Kuala Lumpur, Peninsular Malaysia. Here we report on the responses of Lamprigera larvae to artificial light from street lamps on paved park trails. Larvae were located farther from artificial light sources when street lamps were illuminated than when they were not, and mostly where light intensities were lowest, off park trails. Larvae that were located within the direct field of illumination tended to be immobile, whereas, when street lamps were turned off, they actively travelled paved trails. Larvae positioned directly in the path of downwelling light from street lamps at dusk may therefore experience an effectively longer diurnal period, limited time for active foraging, and greater exposure to pedestrian traffic.
Address Department of Biological Sciences, Sunway University, Bandar Sunway DE 47500, Selangor, Malaysia; samanth.m(at)
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher (down) Elsevier Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1226-8615 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2753
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Author Liu, M.; Li, W.; Zhang, B.; Hao, Q.; Xiaowei, G.; Yuchuan, L.
Title Research on the Influence of Weather Conditions on Urban Night Light Environment Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Sustainable Cities and Society Abbreviated Journal Sustainable Cities and Society
Volume 54 Issue Pages 101980
Keywords Skyglow; Weather; sky brightness; Urban
Abstract The increasingly serious urban light pollution has deepened the relevant research, and weather conditions indeed have great impact on the urban night light environment. Based on the SQM instrument, fish-eye camera and weather-related systems, this paper analyzes the changing law of night sky with time and weather. The brightness of the typical clear night sky changes regularly with time, and mainly includes five phases: rapid decline phase, slow decline phase, unstable decline phase, smooth phase, and rapid increase phase of sky brightness. In two phases of the smooth sky brightness, the average sky brightness in the high and low brightness phase respectively is 18.123 mag/arcsecond2 and 18.82 mag/arcsecond2, and about 15 times and 8 times higher than those of the natural night sky. This paper establishes the regression model of typical clear night sky brightness in rapid decline phase and rapid increase phase of sky brightness. The sky magnitude brightness in rainy weather is much lower than that in clear weather, the difference is about 3 mag/arcsecond2, the brightness can be reach 15.63 mag / arcsecond2; the average magnitude brightness in snowy days is about 0.17 mag/arcsecond2 higher than that in cloudy weather. There is a significant correlation among the air quality index, the ground illumination ratio of moon, the atmospheric visibility and the sky brightness. The deepened air pollution can also intensify light pollution, which can increase to 3 and 10 times higher than the night sky brightness under the moderate and severe air pollution. The lunar cycle has the least impact on light pollution in clear days, the sky brightness with the full moon is about 2 and 3 times higher than that without the moon.
Address Corresponding author at: No.2, Ling Gong Road, Gan Jing Zi District, School of Architecture and Fine Art, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian, Liao Ning Province 116024, China; iumingyitj(at)163.com
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher (down) Elsevier Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2210-6707 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2759
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Author Bielli, A.; Alfaro-Shigueto, J.; Doherty, P.D.; Godley, B.J.; Ortiz, C.; Pasara, A.; Wang, J.H.; Mangel, J.C.
Title An illuminating idea to reduce bycatch in the Peruvian small-scale gillnet fishery Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Biological Conservation Abbreviated Journal Biological Conservation
Volume in press Issue Pages 108277
Keywords Animals; oceans; bycatch; artificial illumination; bycatch reduction technologies
Abstract Found in the coastal waters of all continents, gillnets are the largest component of small-scale fisheries for many countries. Numerous studies show that these fisheries often have high bycatch rates of threatened marine species such as sea turtles, small cetaceans and seabirds, resulting in possible population declines of these non-target groups. However, few solutions to reduce gillnet bycatch have been developed. Recent bycatch reduction technologies (BRTs) use sensory cues to alert non-target species to the presence of fishing gear. In this study we deployed light emitting diodes (LEDs) – a visual cue – on the floatlines of paired gillnets (control vs illuminated net) during 864 fishing sets on small-scale vessels departing from three Peruvian ports between 2015 and 2018. Bycatch probability per set for sea turtles, cetaceans and seabirds as well as catch per unit effort (CPUE) of target species were analysed for illuminated and control nets using a generalised linear mixed-effects model (GLMM). For illuminated nets, bycatch probability per set was reduced by up to 74.4 % for sea turtles and 70.8 % for small cetaceans in comparison to non-illuminated, control nets. For seabirds, nominal BPUEs decreased by 84.0 % in the presence of LEDs. Target species CPUE was not negatively affected by the presence of LEDs. This study highlights the efficacy of net illumination as a multi-taxa BRT for small-scale gillnet fisheries in Peru. These results are promising given the global ubiquity of small-scale net fisheries, the relatively low cost of LEDs and the current lack of alternate solutions to bycatch.
Address Centre for Ecology and Conservation, University of Exeter, Penryn, Cornwall, TR10 9FE, UK; bielli.alessandra(at)gmail.com
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher (down) Elsevier Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0006-3207 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2779
Permanent link to this record