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Author Vanbergen, A.J.; Potts, S.G.; Vian, A.; Malkemper, E.P.; Young, J.; Tscheulin, T. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Risk to pollinators from anthropogenic electro-magnetic radiation (EMR): Evidence and knowledge gaps Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Science of The Total Environment Abbreviated Journal Science of The Total Environment  
  Volume 695 Issue Pages 133833  
  Keywords Animals; Ecology; review; anthropogenic radiofrequency electromagnetic radiation; AREMR; bees; Apis mellifera; pollinators  
  Abstract Worldwide urbanisation and use of mobile and wireless technologies (5G, Internet of Things) is leading to the proliferation of anthropogenic electromagnetic radiation (EMR) and campaigning voices continue to call for the risk to human health and wildlife to be recognised. Pollinators provide many benefits to nature and humankind, but face multiple anthropogenic threats. Here, we assess whether artificial light at night (ALAN) and anthropogenic radiofrequency electromagnetic radiation (AREMR), such as used in wireless technologies or emitted from power lines, represent an additional and growing threat to pollinators. A lack of high quality scientific studies means that knowledge of the risk to pollinators from anthropogenic EMR is either inconclusive, unresolved, or only partly established. A handful of studies provide evidence that ALAN can alter pollinator communities, pollination and fruit set. Laboratory experiments provide some, albeit variable, evidence that the honey bee Apis mellifera and other invertebrates can detect EMR, potentially using it for orientation or navigation, but they do not provide evidence that AREMR affects insect behaviour in ecosystems. Scientifically robust evidence of AREMR impacts on abundance or diversity of pollinators (or other invertebrates) are limited to a single study reporting positive and negative effects depending on the pollinator group and geographical location. Therefore, whether anthropogenic EMR (ALAN or AREMR) poses a significant threat to insect pollinators and the benefits they provide to ecosystems and humanity remains to be established.  
  Address Agroécologie, AgroSup Dijon, INRA, Univ. Bourgogne Franche-Comté, F-21000 Dijon, France; adam.vanbergen(at)inra.fr  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher (down) Elsevier Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0048-9697 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2613  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Campisi, D.; Gitto, S.; Morea, D. url  openurl
  Title Economic feasibility of energy efficiency improvements in street lighting systems in Rome Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication International Journal of Energy Economics and Policy Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 7 Issue 1 Pages 190-198  
  Keywords Economics; Energy; Society; LED lighting; LED; real options  
  Abstract This study evaluates an investment project concerning the redevelopment of the public lighting of the Municipality of Rome. In particular, we consider the replacing of the traditional lamps of the system with LED lamps. We consider the factors that affect this kind of project: the cost of energy, the manteinance cost, the investment cost and the Weighted Average Cost of Capital (WACC). Our results underline the reduction of energy consumption and of the maintenance costs, lower emissions of CO2 into the atmosphere, the reduction of light pollution, the positive effects on road safety and the indipendence by incentives.  
  Address Department of Industrial Engineering, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Italy  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher (down) Elsevier Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2629  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Wallner, S.; Kocifaj, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Impacts of surface albedo variations on the night sky brightness – A numerical and experimental analysis Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy and Radiative Transfer Abbreviated Journal Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy and Radiative Transfer  
  Volume 239 Issue Pages 106648  
  Keywords Skyglow; albedo; surface albedo; Sky Quality Meter; Austria; Europe  
  Abstract The aim of this paper is to analyze surface albedo impacts on artificial night sky brightness at zenith. The way in which these parameters correlate with each other is analyzed numerically and then experimentally by Sky Quality Meters (SQMs) in the city of Linz, Austria between 2016 and 2018. Three SQMs are located in city areas that differ in ground type, while other two are installed outside but near the city. To eliminate systematic errors of different SQMs or a missing inter-calibration of all devices, we examine relative change in zenithal brightness instead of its absolute values. However, the ground albedo not only depends on the ground type, but also shows seasonal variation most often driven by vegetation and environmental change. To understand these changes, we use SkyGlow simulator to perform numerical experiments on four different albedo models. The results have proven that seasonal variations are clearly visible as green city parts become darker around autumn and ratios to urban located SQMs increase. We show that there is a major difference in simulation results if either conducting city parts with various surface albedos or using only one averaged value over the whole city. The latter produces worse fit to the observed SQM data, implying that a use of various surface albedos is a need when modelling zenithal brightness in artificially lit areas of a city or town. Also, the seasonal changes of surface albedo cannot be neglected and the parameter itself must be included in the modelling tools.  
  Address Department of Astrophysics, University of Vienna, Türkenschanzstrasse 17, 1180 Vienna, Austria; stefan.wallner(at)univie.ac.at  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher (down) Elsevier Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0022-4073 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2675  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Ranzoni, J.; Giuliani, G.; Huber, L.; Ray, N. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Modelling the nocturnal ecological continuum of the State of Geneva, Switzerland, based on high-resolution nighttime imagery Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Remote Sensing Applications: Society and Environment Abbreviated Journal Remote Sensing Applications: Society and Environment  
  Volume 16 Issue Pages 100268  
  Keywords Remote Sensing; Ecology; Switzerland; Europe; orthophotography; viewshed analysis  
  Abstract The increase of artificial light in recent decades has led to a general awareness of the harmful consequences of light pollution on biodiversity. The artificial light is however rarely taken into account in the principles of developing ecological networks. There is currently no standardized method for integrating this darkness factor into ecological network modeling. We propose a methodology for the identification of the nocturnal continuum through an approach based on the automated extraction of light sources from nocturnal orthophotography and the modeling of their visibility within a territory. The model is applied to the transboundary region of the Geneva basin in Switzerland and allows for the integration of the darkness factor into the existing ecological networks. Although the analysis does not consider metric lighting data, a viewshed analysis allows for a first large-scale mapping of the nighttime continuum and highlights the areas benefiting from very low light pollution.  
  Address University of Applied Sciences and Arts, Route de Presinge 150, 1254, Jussy, Switzerland; jessica.ranzoni(at)hesge.ch  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher (down) Elsevier Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2352-9385 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2687  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Straka, T.M.; Greif, S.; Schultz, S.; Goerlitz, H.R.; Voigt, C.C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The effect of cave illumination on bats Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Global Ecology and Conservation Abbreviated Journal Global Ecology and Conservation  
  Volume 21 Issue Pages e00808  
  Keywords Animals; Lighting  
  Abstract Artificial light at night has large impacts on nocturnal wildlife such as bats, yet its effect varies with wavelength of light, context, and across species involved. Here, we studied in two experiments how wild bats of cave-roosting species (Rhinolophus mehelyi, R. euryale, Myotis capaccinii and Miniopterus schreibersii) respond to LED lights of different colours. In dual choice experiments, we measured the acoustic activity of bats in response to neutral-white, red or amber LED at a cave entrance and in a flight room – mimicking a cave interior. In the flight room, M. capaccinii and M. schreibersii preferred red to white light, but showed no preference for red over amber, or amber over white light. In the cave entrance experiment, all light colours reduced the activity of all emerging species, yet red LED had the least negative effect. Rhinolophus species reacted most strongly, matching their refusal to fly at all under any light treatment in the flight room. We conclude that the placement and light colour of LED light should be considered carefully in lighting concepts for caves both in the interior and at the entrance. In a cave interior, red LED light could be chosen – if needed at all – for careful temporary illumination of areas, yet areas important for bats should be avoided based on the precautionary principle. At cave entrances, the high sensitivity of most bat species, particularly of Rhinolophus spp., towards light sources almost irrespective of colour, calls for utmost caution when illuminating cave entrances.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher (down) Elsevier Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2351-9894 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2700  
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