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Author Stanley, T.R.; White, J.M.; Teel, S.; Nicholas, M.
Title Brightness of the Night Sky Affects Loggerhead (Caretta caretta) Sea Turtle Hatchling Misorientation but Not Nest Site Selection Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Frontiers in Marine Science Abbreviated Journal Front. Mar. Sci.
Volume 7 Issue Pages
Keywords Animals; marine turtles; sea turtles; Gulf of Mexico; Loggerhead turtle; Caretta caretta; misorientation; Artificial Light At Night
Abstract Sea turtles in the Gulf of Mexico, which are listed as either threatened or endangered under the US Endangered Species Act, face numerous threats but are particularly susceptible to the negative effects of light pollution on nesting beaches. Light pollution affects the distribution, density, and placement of nests on beaches, and disrupts seafinding in hatchlings emerging from nests; often leading to their death. Rapid urban growth near Gulf Islands National Seashore (GUIS), FL, United States, over the last century has contributed to increased light pollution on its beaches. There is concern that light pollution is causing females to build nests in at-risk locations subject to erosion and flooding, and is causing the observed high rates of hatchling misorientation. From 2015 to 2016, we measured brightness of the night sky, horizon profile, and lunar variables at GUIS at loggerhead (Caretta caretta) nests to assess the effects of brightness on building of at-risk nests and hatchling misorientation. In addition, we quantified the effects of relocating at-risk nests on nest success. We found that contrast in brightness between the landward and seaward directions at GUIS was partially responsible for high rates of hatchling misorientation, and there was a strong moderating influence of lunar fraction and lunar altitude on hatchling misorientation: larger lunar fractions and lower lunar altitudes reduced misorientation. We did not find an effect of artificial light, horizon profile, or lunar fraction on the propensity of loggerheads to build nests in at-risk locations, and found no evidence that relocating nests at GUIS reduced loggerhead nest success. In fact, we found that nest success was improved and hatchling misorientation rates were reduced for relocated loggerhead nests.
Address US Geological Survey, Fort Collins, CO, United States
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Frontiers Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2296-7745 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial (down) 3413
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Author Tamir, R.; Eyal, G.; Cohen, I.; Loya, Y.
Title Effects of Light Pollution on the Early Life Stages of the Most Abundant Northern Red Sea Coral Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Microorganisms Abbreviated Journal Microorganisms
Volume 8 Issue 2 Pages
Keywords LED lights; anthropogenic disturbance; coral recruitment; coral reefs; ecosystem management; fluorescent lights; light pollution; photosynthesis.
Abstract The growth in human population along coastal areas is exposing marine environments to increasing anthropogenic light sources. Despite the potential effects of this modern phenomenon, very few studies have examined its implications for corals. Here, we present a long-term study of coral early life stages under light pollution conditions at night. Coral larvae were collected from Stylophora pistillata colonies, and then settled and grown under experimental conditions of two different common city lighting methods (fluorescent or LED). Effects of the artificial lighting on the coral settlement success, survivorship, growth rate, photosynthetic efficiency, and calcification rate were examined over a period of one year. The control exhibited ~30% higher settlement success compared to the two light treatments, while under the light treatments corals showed higher survivorship, growth, and calcification rates. In addition, an indication of damage to the photosynthetic system was found in the light-polluted corals, which was reflected in their photosynthesis efficiency parameters: i.e., lower maximum light utilization coefficient (alpha), lower maximum potential photosynthetic rate (Pmax), and lower photosynthetic maximal quantum yield (Fv/Fm). Our findings provide evidence of the potential adverse effects of artificial lighting methods on the natural environment of coral reefs. We conclude that the use of the LED lighting method has high interference potential for the early life stages of corals.
Address School of Zoology, George S. Wise Faculty of Life Sciences, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 6997801, Israel; raztamir6 ( at ) gmail.com
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher MDPI Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2076-2607 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:32023896; PMCID:PMC7074826 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial (down) 3412
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Author Hannibal, J.
Title Action of Light on the Neuroendocrine Axis Type Book Chapter
Year 2021 Publication Neuroendocrine Clocks and Calendars Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords Human Health; Photoentrainment; circadian rhythm; Neuroendocrine Axis; neuroendocrine system; hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis; hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis; hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis; artificial light at night
Abstract Photoentrainment of the circadian clock located in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) is fundamental for the stable regulation of neuroendocrine function underlying physiological functions such as metabolism, sleep, immune responses, and reproduction. Masking by light directly suppresses melatonin secretion independent of the circadian system, with impact on several neuroendocrine axes. This chapter describes recent findings in anatomy and physiology on how light mediates its effects on SCN-regulated timing of the neuroendocrine system, including the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis, the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis, and melatonin and arginine-vasopressin (AVP) secretion. In modern societies, artificial light at night (ALAN) seems to affect circadian and neuroendocrine systems, and should be considered in the understanding the health problems of the industrialized human population.
Address Department of Clinical Biochemistry Bispebjerg Frederiksberg Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark; j.hannibal ( at ) dadlnet.dk
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Springer Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Ebling F.J.P., Piggins H.D. Series Title Masterclass in Neuroendocrinology Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume 10 Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial (down) 3411
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Author Green, A.; Barak, S.; Shine, L.; Kahane, A.; Dagan, Y.
Title Exposure by males to light emitted from media devices at night is linked with decline of sperm quality and correlated with sleep quality measures Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Chronobiology International Abbreviated Journal Chronobiol Int
Volume 37 Issue 3 Pages 414-424
Keywords Human Health; *Alan; *Sleep; *digital device; *light; *male fertility; *melatonin; *sleepiness; *sperm quality
Abstract The last several decades have been characterized by the widespread usage of digital devices, especially smartphones. At the same time, there have been reports of both decline in sleep duration and quality and male fertility decline. The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between evening exposure to the light-emitting screens of digital media devices and measures of both sleep and sperm quality. Semen samples were obtained from 116 men undergoing fertility evaluation for the following sperm variables: volume (mL), pH, sperm concentration (million/mL), motility percentage (progressive% + non-progressive motility%), and total sperm count. Exposure to the screens of electronic devices and sleep habits was obtained by means of a questionnaire. Smartphone and tablet usage in the evening and after bedtime was negatively correlated with sperm motility (-0.392; -0.369; p < .05), sperm progressive motility (-0.322; -0.299; p < .05), and sperm concentration (-0.169; p < .05), and positively correlated with the percentage of immotile sperm (0.382; 0.344; p < .05). In addition, sleep duration was positively correlated with sperm total and progressive motility (0.249; 0.233; p < .05) and negatively correlated with semen pH (-0.349; p < .05). A significant negative correlation was observed between subjective sleepiness and total and progressive motility (-0.264; p < .05) as well as total motile sperm number (-0.173; p < .05). The results of this study support a link between evening and post-bedtime exposure to light-emitting digital media screens and sperm quality. Further research is required to establish the proposed causative link and may lead to the future development of relevant therapeutic and lifestyle interventions.
Address The Human Biology Department, Haifa University, Haifa, Israel; amitg ( at ) assuta.co.il
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Taylor & Francis Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0742-0528 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:32126861 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial (down) 3410
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Author García-Caparros, P.; Almansa, E.M.; Barbero, F.J.; Chica, R.M.; Lao, M.T.
Title Fittonia verschaffeltii Response to Artificial Light Treatments: BIOMASS, Nutrient Concentrations and Physiological Changes Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Agronomy Abbreviated Journal Agronomy
Volume 10 Issue 1 Pages 126
Keywords Plants; carotenoids; chlorophyll; mineral composition; plant growth; proline; starch
Abstract The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effects of different light treatments on biomass, nutrient concentrations and physiological parameters of Fittonia verschaffeltii (Lem) Van Houtte. The aim was to establish a methodology to evaluate the effect of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) emitted by lamps on biomass. The light treatments used were tube luminescent Dunn (TL-D), tube luminescent Dunn + light emitting diodes (LEDs) and Tube luminescent 5 (TL-5). At the end of the experimental period, biomass, nutritional, biochemical, and physiological parameters were assessed. A clear reduction in total plant dry weight under TL-D + LEDs at the end of the experiment was recorded. With respect to nutrient concentration in the different organs assessed, there was no clear response under the different light treatments. The growth under TL-D lamps resulted in the highest concentration of total soluble sugars and starch in leaves, whereas the highest value of indole 3-acetic acid concentration was under TL-5 lamps. Plants grown under TL-D + LEDs showed the lowest values of chlorophyll a, b and a + b. The relationship proposed between integrated use of spectral energy (IUSE) and total dry weight (TDW) showed a good correlation with an R2 value of 0.86, therefore we recommend this methodology to discern the effects of the different spectral qualities on plant biomass.
Address Agronomy Department of Higher Engineering School, University of Almeria, CIAIMBITAL, Agrifood Campus of International Excellence ceiA3. Ctra. Sacramento s/n, La Cañada de San Urbano, 04120 Almería, Spain; pedrogar123 ( at ) hotmail.com
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher MDPI Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2073-4395 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial (down) 3409
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