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Author Hong, F.; Pan, S.; Xu, P.; Xue, T.; Wang, J.; Guo, Y.; Jia, L.; Qiao, X.; Li, L.; Zhai, Y.
Title Melatonin Orchestrates Lipid Homeostasis through the Hepatointestinal Circadian Clock and Microbiota during Constant Light Exposure Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Cells Abbreviated Journal Cells
Volume 9 Issue 2 Pages in press
Keywords Animals; Cells; Lan; hepatointestinal; lipid homeostasis; melatonin; microbiota
Abstract Misalignment between natural light rhythm and modern life activities induces disruption of the circadian rhythm. It is mainly evident that light at night (LAN) interferes with the human endocrine system and contributes to the increasing rates of obesity and lipid metabolic disease. Maintaining hepatointestinal circadian homeostasis is vital for improving lipid homeostasis. Melatonin is a chronobiotic substance that plays a main role in stabilizing bodily rhythm and has shown beneficial effects in protecting against obesity. Based on the dual effect of circadian rhythm regulation and antiobesity, we tested the effect of melatonin in mice under constant light exposure. Exposure to 24-h constant light (LL) increased weight and insulin resistance compared with those of the control group (12-h light-12-h dark cycle, LD), and simultaneous supplementation in the melatonin group (LLM) ameliorated this phenotype. Constant light exposure disturbed the expression pattern of a series of transcripts, including lipid metabolism, circadian regulation and nuclear receptors in the liver. Melatonin also showed beneficial effects in improving lipid metabolism and circadian rhythm homeostasis. Furthermore, the LL group had increased absorption and digestion of lipids in the intestine as evidenced by the elevated influx of lipids in the duodenum and decrease in the efflux of lipids in the jejunum. More interestingly, melatonin ameliorated the gut microbiota dysbiosis and improved lipid efflux from the intestine. Thus, these findings offer a novel clue regarding the obesity-promoting effect attributed to LAN and suggest a possibility for obesity therapy by melatonin in which melatonin could ameliorate rhythm disorder and intestinal dysbiosis.
Address Key Laboratory for Cell Proliferation and Regulation Biology of State Education Ministry, College of Life Sciences, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875, China
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2073-4409 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:32093272 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 2854
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Author Peregrym, M.; Kabaš, E.; Tashev, A.; Dragićević, S.; Pénzesné Kónya, E.; Savchenko, M.
Title Is Artificial Light at Night Dangerous for the Balkan Strict Protected Areas at Present? Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Water, Air, & Soil Pollution Abbreviated Journal Water Air Soil Pollut
Volume 231 Issue 2 Pages in press
Keywords Conservation; Ecology
Abstract The Balkan Peninsula has rich biodiversity with a large number of endemic species; therefore, a part of its territory has been recognized as a World Biodiversity Hotspot. Despite nature conservation efforts and development of nature conservation networks in countries of the region, anthropogenic influence on natural and semi natural ecosystems is increasing. Moreover,new types of disturbance and pollution arise, and one of the more recent being artificial light at night (ALAN)which has serious consequences on reproduction, navigation, foraging, habitat selection, communication, trophic and social interactions of the biota. We have estimated the level of ecological light pollution in the strictprotected areas of the Republic of Serbia, the Republic of Bulgaria, and Montenegro using available GoogleEarth Pro tools, and the New World Atlas of Artificial Sky Brightness (2016) in the form of a kmz layer. The research has covered 13 National Parks, 11 Nature Parks and 55 Reserves. Our results showed widespread incursion of ALAN within strict protected areas in the studied region that has also been noted for some other countries and regions too. However, the level of light pollution is lower here, than in the most part of Continental Europe, and there are a few areas in each country where the night sky above National and Natural Parks is almost dark. These territories have a special value for nature conservation;therefore, it is important to save the dark night sky there.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0049-6979 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 2853
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Author Yang, Y.; Liu, Q.; Wang, T.; Pan, J.
Title Light pollution disrupts molecular clock in avian species: A power-calibrated meta-analysis Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Environmental Pollution Abbreviated Journal Environmental Pollution
Volume in press Issue Pages 114206
Keywords Animals
Abstract Nighttime lighting is an increasingly important anthropogenic environmental stress on plants and animals. Exposure to unnatural lighting environments may disrupt circadian rhythm. However, studies involved in molecular biology, e.g. disruption of molecular circadian clock by light pollution, always have a small sample sizes. The small sample sizes result in a low statistical power and difficulties in replicating prior results. Here, a power-calibrated meta-analysis was developed to overcome these weakness. The results demonstrated that effect size of 2.48 in clock genes induced by artificial light would promised the reproducibility of the results as high as 80%. Long wavelength light entrained the positive core clock genes and negative core clock genes with robust circadian rhythmic expression, whereas some of those genes, e.g. cClock, cCry1, cCry2, cPer2, and cPer3, were arrhythmic in short wavelength light. Artificial light entrained the transcriptional-translational feedback loop of molecular clock in a wavelength-dependent manner. The expression positive core clock genes (cBmal1, cBmal2 and cClock), cAanat gene and melatonin were the greatest in short wavelength light and the lowest in long wavelength light. However, for negative regulators of molecular clock (cCry1, cCry2, cPer2 and cPer3), the greatest were in long wavelength light and the lowest were in short wavelength light. Our study opens up new opportunities to understand and strengthen conclusions based on the studies with small sample sizes and provides further insight about the disrupting in circadian rhythm by short wavelength light. Especially, the global lighting is shifting from “yellow” sodium lamps toward blue-enriched “white” light-emitting diodes (LEDs).
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0269-7491 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 2852
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Author Nanjo, S.; Hozumi, Y.; Hosokawa, K.; Kataoka, R.; Miyoshi, Y.; Oyama, S.‐ichiro; Ozaki, M.; Shiokawa, K.; Kurita, S.
Title Fine‐Scale Visualization of Aurora in a Wide Area Using Color Digital Camera Images From the International Space Station Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics Abbreviated Journal J. Geophys. Res. Space Physics
Volume 125 Issue 3 Pages
Keywords natural light; aurora
Abstract The full‐color photographs of aurora have been taken with digital single‐lens reflex cameras mounted on the International Space Station (ISS). Since these photographs do not have accurate time and geographical information, in order to use them as scientific data, it is necessary to calibrate the imaging parameters (such as looking direction and angle of view of the camera) of the photographs. For this purpose, we calibrated the imaging parameters using a city light image taken from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program satellite following the method of Hozumi et al. (2016, https://doi.org/10.1186/s40623-016-0532-z). We mapped the photographs onto the geographic coordinate system using the calibrated imaging parameters. To evaluate the accuracy of the mapping, we compared the aurora taken simultaneously from ISS and ground. Comparing the spatial structure of discrete aurora and the temporal variation of pulsating aurora, the accuracy of the data set is less than 0.3 s in time and less than 5 km in space in the direction perpendicular to the looking direction of the camera. The generated data set has a wide field of view ( urn:x-wiley:jgra:media:jgra55570:jgra55570-math-00011,100  urn:x-wiley:jgra:media:jgra55570:jgra55570-math-0002 900 km), and their temporal resolution is less than 1 s. Not only that, the field of view can sweep a wide area ( urn:x-wiley:jgra:media:jgra55570:jgra55570-math-00033,000 km in longitude) in a short time ( urn:x-wiley:jgra:media:jgra55570:jgra55570-math-000410 min). Thus, this new imaging capability will enable us to capture the evolution of fine‐scale spatial structure of aurora in a wide area.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2169-9380 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 2851
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Author Min, M.; Zheng, J.; Zhang, P.; Hu, X.; Chen, L.; Li, X.; Huang, Y.; Zhu, L.
Title A low-light radiative transfer model for satellite observations of moonlight and earth surface light at night Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy and Radiative Transfer Abbreviated Journal Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy and Radiative Transfer
Volume in press Issue Pages 106954
Keywords Remote Sensing; Instrumentation
Abstract Lunar sun-reflected light can be effectively measured through a low-light band or a day/night band (DNB) implemented on space-based optical sensors. Based on moonlight, nocturnal observations for artificial light sources at night can be achieved. However, to date, an open-sourced and mature Low-Light Radiative Transfer Model (LLRTM) for the further understanding of the radiative transfer problem at night is still unavailable. Therefore, this study develops a new LLRTM at night with the correction of the lunar and active surface light sources. First, the radiative transfer equations with an active surface light source are derived for the calculation based on the lunar spectral irradiance (LSI) model. The simulation from this new LLRTM shows a minimal bias when compared with the discrete ordinates radiative transfer (DISORT) model. The simulated results of radiance and reflectance at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) also show that the surface light source has a remarkable impact on the radiative transfer process. In contrast, the change in the lunar phase angle has minimal influence. Also, comparing with space-based DNB radiance observations, LLRTM shows the potential to simulate space-based low-light imager observations under an effective surface light source condition during the night.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0022-4073 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 2850
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