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Author Zheng, H.; Gui, Z.; Wu, H.; Song, A.
Title Developing Non-Negative Spatial Autoregressive Models for Better Exploring Relation Between Nighttime Light Images and Land Use Types Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Remote Sensing Abbreviated Journal Remote Sensing
Volume 12 Issue 5 Pages 798
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract Exploring the relationship between nighttime light and land use is of great significance to understanding human nighttime activities and studying socioeconomic phenomena. Models have been studied to explain the relationships, but the existing studies seldom consider the spatial autocorrelation of night light data, which leads to large regression residuals and an inaccurate regression correlation between night light and land use. In this paper, two non-negative spatial autoregressive models are proposed for the spatial lag model and spatial error model, respectively, which use a spatial adjacency matrix to calculate the spatial autocorrelation effect of light in adjacent pixels on the central pixel. The application scenarios of the two models were analyzed, and the contribution of various land use types to nighttime light in different study areas are further discussed. Experiments in Berlin, Massachusetts and Shenzhen showed that the proposed methods have better correlations with the reference data compared with the non-negative least-squares method, better reflecting the luminous situation of different land use types at night. Furthermore, the proposed model and the obtained relationship between nighttime light and land use types can be utilized for other applications of nighttime light images in the population, GDP and carbon emissions for better exploring the relationship between nighttime remote sensing brightness and socioeconomic activities.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2072-4292 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 2848
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Author Franziska, K.; Franz, H.; Werner, K.
Title Can skyglow reduce nocturnal melatonin concentrations in Eurasian perch? Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Environmental Pollution Abbreviated Journal Environmental Pollution
Volume in press Issue Pages 114324
Keywords Animals
Abstract Artificial light at night (ALAN) changes the natural rhythm of light and darkness and can impair the biorhythms of animals, for example the nocturnal melatonin production of vertebrates, which serves as a proxy for daily physiological rhythms. Freshwater fish are exposed to ALAN in large urban and suburban areas in the form of direct light or in the form of skyglow, a diffuse brightening of the night sky through the scattered light reflected by clouds, atmospheric molecules, and particles in the air. However, investigations on the sensitivity of melatonin production of fish towards low intensities of ALAN in the range of typical skyglow are rare. Therefore, we exposed Eurasian perch (Perca fluviatilis) to nocturnal illumination levels of 0.01 lx, 0.1 lx and 1 lx and a control group with dark nights and daylight intensities of 2900 lx in all groups. After ten days of exposure to the experimental conditions, tank water was non-invasively sampled every 3 h over a 24 h period and melatonin was measured by ELISA. Melatonin was gradually reduced in all treatments with increasing intensity of ALAN whereas rhythmicity was maintained in all treatment groups although at 1 lx not all evaluated parameters confirmed rhythmicity. These results show a high sensitivity of Eurasian perch towards ALAN indicating that low light intensities of 0.01 lx and 0.1 lx as they occur in urban and suburban areas in the form of skyglow can affect the physiology of Eurasian perch. Furthermore, we highlight how this may impact perch in their sensitivity towards lunar rhythms and the role of skyglow for biorhythms of temperate freshwater fish.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0269-7491 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 2847
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Author Bhardwaj, M.; Soanes, K.; Lahoz-Monfort, J.J.; Lumsden, L.F.; van der Ree, R.
Title Artificial lighting reduces the effectiveness of wildlife-crossing structures for insectivorous bats Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Journal of Environmental Management Abbreviated Journal Journal of Environmental Management
Volume 262 Issue Pages 110313
Keywords Animals
Abstract In an attempt to improve cost-effectiveness, it has become increasingly popular to adapt wildlife crossing structures to enable people to also use them for safe passage across roads. However, the required needs of humans and wildlife may conflict, resulting in a structure that does not actually provide the perceived improvement in cost-effectiveness, but instead a reduction in conservation benefits. For example, lighting within crossing structures for human safety at night may reduce use of the structure by nocturnal wildlife, thus contributing to barrier and mortality effects of roads rather than mitigating them.

In this study, we experimentally evaluated the impact of artificial light at night on the rate of use of wildlife crossing structures, specifically underpasses, by ten insectivorous bat species groups in south-eastern Australia. We monitored bat activity before, during and after artificially lighting the underpasses. We found that bats tended to avoided lit underpasses, and only one species consistently showed attraction to the light. Artificial light at night in underpasses hypothetically increases the vulnerability of bats to road-mortality or to the barrier effect of roads. The most likely outcomes of lighting underpasses were 1. an increase in crossing rate above the freeway and a decrease under the underpasses, or 2. a reduction in crossing rate both above freeways and under the underpasses, when structures were lit. Our results corroborate those of studies on terrestrial mammals, and thus we recommend that underpasses intended to facilitate the movement of wildlife across roads should not be lit.
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Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0301-4797 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 2846
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Author Atchoi, E.; Mitkus, M.; Rodríguez, A.
Title Is seabird light‐induced mortality explained by the visual system development? Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Conservation Science and Practice Abbreviated Journal Conservat Sci and Prac
Volume in press Issue Pages
Keywords Animals
Abstract Seabirds are impacted by coastal light pollution, leading to massive mortality events. Juveniles comprise the majority of affected individuals, while adults are only seldom grounded and reported in rescue programs. We propose a connection between visual system development of burrow nesting seabirds and the observed higher vulnerability to light pollution by a specific age group. We illustrate the need for multidisciplinary research to better understand and further mitigate light-induced mortality.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2578-4854 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 2845
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Author Niklaus, S.; Albertini, S.; Schnitzer, T.K.; Denk, N.
Title Challenging a Myth and Misconception: Red-Light Vision in Rats Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Animals : an Open Access Journal From MDPI Abbreviated Journal Animals (Basel)
Volume 10 Issue 3 Pages
Keywords animals; cones; electroretinogram; husbandry; photoreceptors; rat; red light; retina; rods
Abstract Due to the lack of L-cones in the rodent retina, it is generally assumed that red light is invisible to rodents. Thus, red lights and red filter foils are widely used in rodent husbandry and experimentation allowing researchers to observe animals in an environment that is thought to appear dark to the animals. To better understand red-light vision in rodents, we assessed retinal sensitivity of pigmented and albino rats to far-red light by electroretinogram. We examined the sensitivity to red light not only on the light- but also dark-adapted retina, as red observation lights in husbandry are used during the dark phase of the light cycle. Intriguingly, both rods and cones of pigmented as well as albino rats show a retinal response to red light, with a high sensitivity of the dark-adapted retina and large electroretinogram responses in the mesopic range. Our results challenge the misconception of rodents being red-light blind. Researchers and housing facilities should rethink the use of red observation lights at night.
Address Pharma Research and Early Development (pRED), Pharmaceutical Sciences (PS), Roche Innovation Center Basel, 4070 Basel, Switzerland
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2076-2615 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:32138167 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 2844
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