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Author Zissis, G.
Title Sustainable Lighting and Light Pollution: A Critical Issue for the Present Generation, a Challenge to the Future Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Sustainability Abbreviated Journal Sustainability
Volume 12 Issue 11 Pages 4552
Keywords Society; light pollution measurement and modelling; light pollution impact on fauna and flora; light pollution impact on human health; policies to prevent/limit light pollution and territorial management; best practices for street lighting with low impact on light pollution; smart lighting and light pollution
Abstract Human beings’ poor night vision and primitive fear of the dark are reflected in an imperative need to use artificial light to illuminate their environment. Outdoor illumination undoubtedly contributes to the enhancement of practical opportunities for social and economic developments. Considered as a necessity, a means of security, and an attraction or valorization, city lighting growth has been literally exponential in the last half century. Beyond the financial and energy resources that it absorbs, the artificial lighting of urban spaces overflows its objective by polluting our nights to the point that, in our modern megacities, the stars disappear. Apart from the fact that stars are no longer visible, the scientific community is increasingly interested in the direct and indirect impacts of artificial lighting on biodiversity. In parallel, some studies have shown recently that stray light may have direct or indirect effects on human health and mood. The scope of this Special Issue, dedicated to the memory of Prof. Abraham Haim and Dr. Thomas Posch, is to put together a series of high-level papers treating light pollution in a holistic manner that goes from technological advances to policies, passing through impacts on biotopes and human health. Beyond its evident scientific interest, this Special Issue is also contributing to awareness raising, aimed at decision- and policy-makers.
Address LAPLACE UMR 5213 CNRS-INPT-UT3, Université de Toulouse, 118 route de Narbonne, 31062 Toulouse, CEDEX 9, France; georges.zissis ( at ) laplace.univ-tlse.fr
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher MDPI Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2071-1050 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial (down) 3398
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Author Rybnikova, N.; Portnov, B.A.
Title Testing the generality of economic activity models estimated by merging night-time satellite images with socioeconomic data Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Advances in Space Research Abbreviated Journal Advances in Space Research
Volume 66 Issue 11 Pages 2610-2620
Keywords Economics; Remote Sensing; Artificial light at night; Cross-validation; Modelling; Quaternary industries
Abstract Knowledge-based economic activities (aka quaternary industries or QIs) are characterized by high concentrations of labour force and potentially high night-time light emissions. Therefore, geographic concentrations of such activities can presumably be identified using information on the amount artificial light at night (ALAN), which different geographic areas emit. Question, however, remains whether the models, incorporating ALAN data, are place-specific or whether such models are sufficiently generic, thus making it possible to apply them, once estimated, to other countries and continents. To answer this question, the analysis is performed in several phases. First, we build separate models for European NUTS3 regions and US counties. Next, we cross-validate these models and use them to predict QI concentrations worldwide. As the analysis shows, cross-validation of the models, applied to the “counterpart” continent, also results in a reasonably good fit, with R2 reaching 0.852, when the US-model is applied to the EU data, and R2 = 0.896, when the EU-model is applied to the US data. Although attempts to use ALAN data for the analysis of different socio-economic phenomena are not new, to the best of our knowledge, this is the study first that uses cross-continent validation of ALAN-based models to determine their generality.
Address Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Management, University of Haifa, Haifa, Israel; nataliya.rybnikova ( at ) gmail.com
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Elsevier Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0273-1177 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial (down) 3397
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Author Sun, S.; Cao, W.; Ge, Y.; Ran, J.; Sun, F.; Zeng, Q.; Guo, M.; Huang, J.; Lee, R.S.-Y.; Tian, L.; Wellenius, G.A.
Title Outdoor light at night and risk of coronary heart disease among older adults: a prospective cohort study Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication European Heart Journal Abbreviated Journal Eur Heart J
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords Human health; Cohort study; Coronary heart disease; Hospitalization; Light at night; Mortality
Abstract AIMS: We estimated the association between outdoor light at night at the residence and risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) within a prospective cohort of older adults in Hong Kong. METHODS AND RESULTS: Over a median of 11 years of follow-up, we identified 3772 incident CHD hospitalizations and 1695 CHD deaths. Annual levels of outdoor light at night at participants' residential addresses were estimated using time-varying satellite data for a composite of persistent night-time illumination at approximately 1 km2 scale. We used Cox proportional hazards models to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of the association between outdoor light at night at the residence and risk of CHD. The association between light at night and incident CHD hospitalization and mortality exhibited a monotonic exposure-response function. An interquartile range (IQR) (60.0 nW/cm2/sr) increase in outdoor light at night was associated with an HR of 1.11 (95% CI: 1.03, 1.18) for CHD hospitalizations and 1.10 (95% CI: 1.00, 1.22) for CHD deaths after adjusting for both individual and area-level risk factors. The association did not vary across strata of hypothesized risk factors. CONCLUSION: Among older adults, outdoor light at night at the residence was associated with a higher risk of CHD hospitalizations and deaths. We caution against causal interpretation of these novel findings. Future studies with more detailed information on exposure, individual adaptive behaviours, and potential mediators are warranted to further examine the relationship between light at night and CHD risk.
Address Department of Environmental Health, Boston University School of Public Health, 715 Albany Street, Boston, MA 02118, USA; linweit ( at ) hku.hk
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Oxford Academic Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0195-668X ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:33205210 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial (down) 3396
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Author Okuliarova, M.; Rumanova, V.S.; Stebelova, K.; Zeman, M.
Title Dim Light at Night Disturbs Molecular Pathways of Lipid Metabolism Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication International Journal of Molecular Sciences Abbreviated Journal Int J Mol Sci
Volume 21 Issue 18 Pages
Keywords Human health; chronodisruption; circadian clocks; fatty acids; glucose; insulin; leptin; lipogenesis; liver; nuclear receptors; steatosis
Abstract Dim light at night (dLAN) is associated with metabolic risk but the specific effects on lipid metabolism have only been evaluated to a limited extent. Therefore, to explore whether dLAN can compromise lipid metabolic homeostasis in healthy individuals, we exposed Wistar rats to dLAN (~2 lx) for 2 and 5 weeks and analyzed the main lipogenic pathways in the liver and epididymal fat pad, including the control mechanisms at the hormonal and molecular level. We found that dLAN promoted hepatic triacylglycerol accumulation, upregulated hepatic genes involved in de novo synthesis of fatty acids, and elevated glucose and fatty acid uptake. These observations were paralleled with suppressed fatty acid synthesis in the adipose tissue and altered plasma adipokine levels, indicating disturbed adipocyte metabolic function with a potential negative impact on liver metabolism. Moreover, dLAN-exposed rats displayed an elevated expression of two peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor family members (Pparalpha and Ppargamma) in the liver and adipose tissue, suggesting the deregulation of important metabolic transcription factors. Together, our results demonstrate that an impaired balance of lipid biosynthetic pathways caused by dLAN can increase lipid storage in the liver, thereby accounting for a potential linking mechanism between dLAN and metabolic diseases.
Address Department of Animal Physiology and Ethology, Faculty of Natural Sciences, Comenius University, Ilkovicova 6, 842 15 Bratislava, Slovakia; monika.okuliarova ( at ) uniba.sk
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher MDPI Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1422-0067 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:32967195; PMCID:PMC7555372 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial (down) 3395
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Author Longcore, T.; Duriscoe, D.; Aubé, M.; Jechow, A.; Kyba, C.C.M.; Pendoley, K.L.
Title Commentary: Brightness of the Night Sky Affects Loggerhead (Caretta caretta) Sea Turtle Hatchling Misorientation but Not Nest Site Selection Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Frontiers in Marine Science Abbreviated Journal Front. Mar. Sci.
Volume 7 Issue Pages
Keywords Commentary; light pollution; sea turtles; light measurement; photometry; glare; sky quality meter
Abstract A Commentary on “Brightness of the Night Sky Affects Loggerhead (Caretta caretta) Sea Turtle Hatchling Misorientation but Not Nest Site Selection” by Stanley, T. R., White, J. M., Teel, S., and Nicholas, M. (2020). Front. Mar. Sci. 7:221. doi: 10.3389/fmars.2020.00221
Address UCLA Institute of the Environment and Sustainability, Los Angeles, CA, United States
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Frontiers Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2296-7745 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial (down) 3394
Permanent link to this record